Canada Dry Settles Ginger Ale Lawsuit Over ‘Made From Real Ginger’ Marketing, Agrees To Pay Over $200,000

A man who sued the maker of Canada Dry ginger ale, claiming the brand falsely implied its soda had health benefits, is now $200,000 richer.

The maker of Canada Dry ginger ale settled a class-action false-advertising lawsuit filed by British Columbia man Victor Cardoso, who claimed to have spent years buying the carbonated beverage for his family thinking it had medicinal benefits based on its label promoting it as “Made from Real Ginger” and “Natural,” CTV News reported.

Canada Dry Mott’s agreed to pay $200,000 plus $18,607 in disbursements, even though the company “expressly denies liability and is not required to change its product labeling or advertising for products marketed in Canada,” court documents say. 

The company also agreed it would no longer make claims that its ginger ale is “Made from Real Ginger” in class-action lawsuits also filed in the U.S., according to CTV News. 

Cardoso argued in the lawsuit that Canada Dry’s product labeling aimed to “capitalize” on consumer’s perception of ginger and its health benefits, despite Canada Dry making no direct health benefit claims about the ginger ale. 

“They do buy actual ginger, but then what they do is they boil it in ethanol, and that essentially destroys any nutritional or medicinal benefits,” Mark C. Canofari, a lawyer who represented Cardoso’s claim, said in a statement, according to CTV News.

Source: Fox News

Here are the new Charlotte Hornets uniforms, and everything you need to know about them

Charlotte Hornets fans have loved the teal pinstripes since 1988. The team listened and learned.

Next season’s primary uniforms will be white jerseys with teal pinstripes and teal jerseys with white pinstripes, the Hornets announced Monday. They won’t quite be direct replicas of Alexander Julian’s iconic design, but they’re close.

The new look will be available to fans for retail purchase Oct. 1.

When the Bobcats re-branded to the Hornets’ name and look in the spring of 2014, they adopted the original teal and purple color scheme. However, the uniforms were dissimilar to Julian’s pinstripe-and-pleats look, which so contributed to the expansion team’s popularity in the early 1990s. They were teal as the dominant color, but had broader stripes down the side of jerseys.

The Hornets wore replicas of the original uniforms for a handful of games each of the past three seasons, and again that uniform was wildly popular. So, this new design owes heavily to that look.

“We really had our ear to the ground listening to our fans’ comments, many of which through social media,” said Seth Bennett, Hornets senior vice president for consumer engagement. “As we were unveiling some of the uniforms, we kind of paid attention to the feedback and comments we were getting. And some of the polls that we used, to see the popularity of various uniforms.

“We definitely used that to inform the process.”

Under NBA rules, Bennett said, the Hornets couldn’t change the look of their primary uniforms for at least five years.

The Hornets will wear the new pinstripe uniforms most games next season. There will be two other uniforms available: Purple ones with “CHA” stenciled across the chest and an updated version of the “city edition,” to be unveiled later. Most recently, that “city edition” was a gray uniform with “CHA” across the chest.

The rebrand to Hornets has been a success: Bennett said the Hornets have been in the top half of the NBA in merchandise sales consistently since the switch from Bobcats to Hornets

The original classic uniforms, worn by the likes of Larry Johnson, Dell Curry and Muggsy Bogues, will now only be available for celebrating anniversaries. Bennett said, “it will be a few seasons before you see those classic jerseys again.”

Source: The Charlotte Observer

Nike’s controversial Vaporfly shoes are making runners faster — so runners sponsored by other brands are blacking them out to wear in secret

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Vaporflys (and prototypes of them) have been involved in nearly every major running victory and milestone since 2016, and for good reason: Research suggests the design of their soles gives runners at least 4% more energetic efficiency over shoes from competing brands.

“The runner runs the race, but the shoe enables him or her to run it faster for the same effort or ability,” Geoff Burns, a kinesiology researcher and pro runner, told Business Insider of Vaporflys. “So for two athletes of equal ability on race day, the one with the shoes is going to beat the one without the shoes.”

That has led some athletes sponsored by companies other than Nike to don Vaporflys in secret. In at least three competitions, non-Nike runners have worn “blacked-out” Vaporflys: shoes covered in black permanent marker to make it difficult to spot the Nike swoosh.

Source: Yahoo

NBA fires Houston Rockets’ photographer Bill Baptist who posted offensive meme about Kamala Harris; removed from bubble

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A photographer working in the NBA bubble at Disney World was let go by the league after he posted an offensive meme about Kamala Harris, the newly announced Democratic candidate for vice president.

Bill Baptist is a freelance photographer from Houston who has covered the Houston Rockets for a number of years and was in the bubble as an independent contractor. The meme he posted on Facebook saw a wider audience when it was shared by former Houston Comets superstar Sheryl Swoopes.

The NBA said in a statement to KPRC 2 in Houston that Baptist was no longer in the bubble.

Source: Yahoo Sports

Kraft Heinz (KHC) will rebrand their Kraft Macaroni & Cheese line as a breakfast food

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Kraft wants you to wake up and smell the mac and cheese.

More Americans are eating at home as the pandemic spreads across the United States, and household routines are changing. So Kraft Heinz (KHC) announced Tuesday that it will rebrand its Kraft Macaroni and Cheese Dinner along with its iconic blue box.

It’s not getting a full redesign: The company is just adding the word “breakfast” — instead of dinner — to encourage Americans to start their day with neon orange cheesy noodles.

The company hopes the new “breakfast” label could take away some of the shame that’s associated with parents serving their kids easy-to-make non-breakfast foods in the morning.

Americans are eating at home more during the pandemic, and that’s been good news for Kraft Heinz. The company’s stock is up 9% this year. Breakfast in particular has been a boon for the prepared foods business — and a struggle for restaurants like Starbucks and McDonald’s, which have invested huge amounts of money and resources into luring commuters with coffee and quick-serve food. Fewer people are commuting, and breakfast has become a home meal once again.

Source: CNN