PANTONE Unveils 2022 Color Of The Year, ‘Very Peri’, A Hue Invented From Scratch

As we step into the last days of the year, PANTONE is looking forward to 2022 with its annual Color of the Year. For the year ahead, the global color authority has chosen the shade ‘Very Peri’: a periwinkle blue that inspires calm but is vivified by a violet red undertone.

Instead of dipping into its existing database of hues, this is the first time the company has created a brand-new shade. The team blended the constancy of blue with the excitement of red, resulting in a blue hue that’s both carefree yet empowering.

“Creating a new color for the first time in the history of our PANTONE Color of the Year educational color program reflects the global innovation and transformation taking place,” said Laurie Pressman, Vice President of the PANTONE Color Institute.

“As society continues to recognize color as a critical form of communication and as a way to express and affect ideas and emotions and engage and connect, the complexity of this new red-violet-infused blue hue highlights the expansive possibilities that lie before us.”

While society emerges from a prolonged period of isolation, Very Peri represents the transformative times we’re living in, with our notions of daily living changing, and our physical and digital lives becoming more intertwined.

The “happiest and warmest of all blue hues” illustrates the complexity and fusion of modern life together with an “empowering mix of newness.”

“The selection of PANTONE 17-3938 Very Peri brings a novel perspective and vision of the trusted and beloved blue color family,” explained Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the PANTONE Color Institute.

“Encompassing the qualities of blues, yet at the same time possessing a violet-red undertone, PANTONE 17-3938 Very Peri displays a spritely, joyous attitude and dynamic presence that encourages courages creativity and imaginative expression.”

Source: DesignTAXI

The Hidden Message You Didn’t Realize Was In The Twix Logo

Do you remember when you learned that the FedEx logo had a hidden arrow in it? If this is news to you, check the negative space between the “E” and the “x.” Neat, eh? Logo design is a crucial part of the branding process, for sure, especially with household items and food products, considering just how often customers will be looking at the packaging. Iconic logos like Coca-Cola’s swoopy cursive letterforms and the McDonald’s golden arches have stood the test of time, but those are pretty straightforward examples. More intriguing is when designers decide to slip in secret design elements for consumers to find. This is the hidden message you didn’t realize was in the Twix logo.

France Secretly Changed Its Flag’s Blue A Year Ago And Practically No One Noticed

It’s literally been waving at people but they didn’t pay heed. The blue in the French flag is now navy, reverting to the shade used before 1976 to remember the Revolution.

The exterior of the Elysée Palace, along with other presidential buildings, has been sporting the look for a year unannounced. The refresh was only made public with the publication of the book Elysée Confidentiel by journalists Eliot Blondet and Paul Larrouturou in mid-September, which recounts how the color had been so abruptly swapped, euronews reports.

Arnaud Jolens, the Elysée’s director of operations, had walked into President Emmanuel Macron’s office on the eve of the country’s National Day in 2020 bringing two variations of the flag—the post-1976 version and this one—and then declared: “By the way, I’m changing the flags on all the buildings of the presidency tomorrow.” Macron smiled.

Navy blue honors “the imagination of the Volunteers of Year II, the Poilus of 1914 and the Compagnons de la Libération of Free France,” the French Presidency details. The Volunteers of Year II were France’s first citizen army who, in 1791, volunteered to protect French territory from a threatened Prussian/Austrian invasion post-Revolution (hence the term “Year II.”)

This was the shade of the tri-colored flag up to 45 years before, and the same one flown under the Arc de Triomphe every year on Armistice Day on November 11.

The blue was later brightened to match the one in the European Union flag, a decision made by former president Valéry Giscard d’Estaing.

Decades after, the French presidency has readopted the classic navy. The switch of flags across presidential landmarks cost €5,000.

Macron was evidently pleased by the decision. “The flag that all the presidents have been dragging around since [1976] was not the real French flag,” the book explains, describing the details of the conversation between Macron and Jolens.

Source: DesignTAXI

Netflix Gives Cereal Boxes An 80s-Style ‘Stranger Things’ Revamp, Now On Sale

General Mills has been on a roll with its collaborations lately. Not only has its packaging been fronted by KAWS’ Companion, but it’s also gone back in time with Netflix for a 1980s-esque makeover ahead of the fourth season of Stranger Things.

The limited-edition Lucky Charms, Cinnamon Toast Crunch (“crispy, sweetened two-plane cereal”), and Cheerios boxes reclaim old General Mills imagery—some upside down—from the era, but the artworks get more surreal with the Stranger Things references plastered all over them.

There’s a missing poster making an appeal to anybody who has information about Barb’s whereabouts to get in touch with Sheriff Hopper; Russian text; and even a sweepstakes with a chance to win a $1,000 shopping spree at Starcourt Mall.

The fronts of the boxes can also be flipped open to reveal games inspired by the series.

These aren’t your regular breakfast cereals, though you can be sure that the edible contents within aren’t 40 years old. Each box is priced at US$19.86, a nod at the year that the upcoming season will take place in, and will retail at the official Netflix store instead of the usual cereal aisles.

Source: DesignTAXI

Hebrew Speakers Mock Facebook’s Corporate Rebrand To Meta

Social media users in Israel are mocking Facebook’s company name change to Meta, as it sounds similar to the Hebrew word for “dead.”

Many Twitter users scoffed at the social media company’s rebrand — revealed by founder Mark Zuckerberg earlier this week — using the hashtag #FacebookDead. “Somebody did not do their #branding research,” one post read.

Dr Nirit Weiss-Blatt, author of The Techlash and Tech Crisis Communication, tweeted: “In Hebrew, *Meta* means *Dead* The Jewish community will ridicule this name for years to come.”

“Grave error?? Facebook’s new name Meta means dead in Hebrew. Hilarious. #FacebookDead” another user tweeted.

Zuckerberg’s efforts to revamp Facebook come as the company faces what could be its most potent scandal since it launched in 2004.

The social media giant is under the spotlight following the publication this week of “The Facebook Papers,” a series of internal documents obtained by 17 news organizations, including CNN, that underpin whistleblower Frances Haugen’s claims the company is riddled with institutional shortcomings.

The documents reveal how Facebook has propelled misinformation, struggled to eliminate human trafficking-related content on the site, and tried to increase its teenage audience, despite internal research suggesting that its platforms, especially Instagram, can have an adverse effect on their mental health.

Facebook isn’t the first company to be ridiculed after its branding didn’t translate abroad.

In 2019, Kim Kardashian West was accused of cultural appropriation after debuting her shapewear brand, which she initially named Kimono. Kardashian even appeared to have trademarked the word “kimono,” a decision that the mayor of Kyoto, Daisaku Kadokawa, criticized in an open letter on Facebook.

“We think that the names for ‘Kimono’ are the asset shared with all humanity who love Kimono and its culture therefore they should not be monopolized,” Kadokawa wrote.

Kardashian changed the name of her brand to Skims later that year.

In 2017, McDonald’s name change in China raised eyebrows. Customers were left confused when the company swapped Maidanglao, a Chinese iteration of the English name, to Jingongmen, which loosely translates to “Golden Arches.” One customer said it “sounds like a furniture store.”

Source: CNN

Some Hooters Employees Say They Won’t Wear The New Uniform Shorts: ‘I Feel Like I’m Working In My Underwear’

Hooters employees made headlines last week as they spoke out on social media against new, smaller uniform shorts that rolled out in locations across the country. Servers and bartenders were largely against the idea of wearing the new shorts, which many compared to underwear.

Insider spoke with four current workers and one former worker in four states, whose names were withheld because they weren’t authorized to speak to media.

A waitress in Alabama said that when the shorts were first introduced at her restaurant, servers had to sign consent forms agreeing to wear the shorts or risk being sent home.

“When I first put the shorts on, I was like, all right, whatever. After wearing them for a few shifts with a little time to process, I realized how uncomfortable I felt,” she said.

Hooters, which has more than 400 locations across 42 states, is known for its wings and “Hooters Girls,” who are known for “glamorous styled hair, camera-ready make-up, and her fit body which all contribute to her confidence and poise,” a current job listing said. Workers have long worn revealing outfits, but now some say the new shorts are too far. 

“My manager said I was wearing them wrong and that they needed to be pulled up on the sides to create a U shape like a smiley, which made them look even smaller,” another server in Florida said.

“These are not what I agreed to wear when I was hired,” a South Carolina bartender said, echoing the complaints that other workers shared with Insider. “There’s almost no bottom.” 

“I feel like I’m working in my underwear,” said another worker, also in Florida. The new shorts make people “feel like they can comment on my body more,” the worker said.

Hooters of America, which did not respond to requests for further comment, said it would get employees’ input in future uniform changes.

Source: Business Insider