Boyce Watkins: Tech N9ne Declined A $60M Deal B/C He’s His Own Boss

Leading scholar and social commentator, Dr. Boyce Watkins of Financial Juneteenth offers his perspective to VladTV as it relates to Hip-Hop’s MCs earnings and how they manage their money. The conversation soon centered on the self-made independent artist Tech N9ne – who Boyce Watkins feels is one of “the greatest rappers in the world right now” – and how he successfully made the Forbes’ 2014 Hip-Hop Cash Kings List.

“Tech N9ne is a brother out of Kansas City, MO who is killing it…he actually turned down a deal for $60 million,” shares Dr. Boyce before adding, “A lot of the reason that he can turn down deals of that magnitude is because Tech has figured out the secret of how to make your own money.”

That comment is soon expounded upon when the analyst offers that “you don’t have to go through any industry begging and borrowing and asking people for an opportunity – you can create your own. And the best thing about being independent is when you sign yourself you’ll never fire yourself.”

Dr. Boyce later contends that the “Anghellic” lyricist’s business acumen has helped him to create his burgeoning empire. “He’s truly different not only in terms of his amazing rapid fire lyrical style, but in the way that he’s been able to monetize his ability in such an effective way.” Make sure you watch the entire clip to find out the “Three Tech Tips” that everyone needs to know in order to make the most money from your business and why Dr. Boyce Watkins feels that “walking away from education is the hugest mistake that any human being could ever make.”

USC To Apologize For WWII-Era Actions That Derailed Japanese American Students’ Educations

The University of Southern California is apologizing to former Japanese American students whose educations were interfered with by the school during World War II.

USC President Carol Folt will issue a formal apology to the former students and award them honorary degrees posthumously, according to the Los Angeles Times. The school is also asking the public for assistance in locating the families of around 120 students who went to USC from 1941-42. 

“This is a stained part of our history,” USC Associate Senior Vice President for Alumni Relations Patrick Auerbach told the Times. “While we can’t change what happened in the past … the university can certainly still do right by their families and let them know that we are posthumously awarding them honorary degrees so that they can occupy that place in the Trojan family, which they deserve.” 

An executive order issued by former President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1943 forced the removal of people of Japanese descent from the West Coast, placing tens of thousands of people in detention camps.

USC refused to release the transcripts of Japanese American students so they could attend another university, the Los Angeles Times reported. When some students attempted to return to USC after the war, the school would not recognize their previously completed courses and told them they would have to start over, their surviving family members noted. 

USC alumni have been pushing for the school to apologize for their actions toward Japanese American students during World War II for years, but the issue gained new momentum after George Floyd’s murder last year, which prompted many institutions to examine their roles in acts of racism.

USC law students last year publicized their research project centering on the issue, titled “Forgotten Trojans,” and an Academic Senate committee also pushed for the school to formally recognize the issue, the Times reported. 

Folt will officially make the apology and award the degrees next spring at an Asian Pacific Alumni Association gala and will also recognize the former students at the school’s commencement in May, according to the Times.

Source: The Hill

Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson Makes Rap Debut In Tech N9ne’s ‘Face Off’

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson became famous as a wrestler and an actor. Now he’s also adding rapper to his résumé. 

The 49-year-old actor made what he calls his “historic rap debut” with a feature in Tech N9ne’s song “Face Off,” released Friday. The song, which also features rappers Joey Cool and King Iso, is part of the Kansas City rapper’s newest album “Asin9ne.” 

“Made my historic rap debut (thankfully I didn’t suck) Huge shout to all the hip hop & music fans for your HYPE reactions,” Johnson tweeted Friday. 

Johnson lays down the last verse of “Face Off” rapping about “drive” and “power.”

“We stay hungry, we devour / Put in the work, put in the hours and take what’s ours / 

Black and Samoan in my veins, my culture bangin’ with Strange,” he raps referring to Tech N9ne’s record label Strange Music Inc. 

In an interview with Variety published Friday Johnson said he doesn’t see a long-term career in rap but would think about giving it another go in the future. 

“I would love to do a repeat with Tech N9ne and Strange Music. If I had the opportunity to collaborate with another artist out there — hip hop artists, blues artists, outlaw country artists — then let’s talk and let’s figure it out,” Johnson said. “If I could rap about the right words that feel real and authentic to me, then I’ll be happy to break out that Teremana, take a few big swigs and jump back into the studio.”

“THANK YOU to my brother, the GOAT @therealtechn9ne for coming up with this big crazy idea of wanting me to drop some Rock gasoline bars on the fire,” Johnson wrote on an Instagram video with a clip of his verse. 

Source: USA Today

TK Kirkland And Vlad Discuss Why White Mafia Guys Get No Prison For Murder

In this clip, TK Kirkland and Vlad discussed how pervasive and pernicious the “No Snitching” code is for people from the streets. They talked about how the Mafia is heralded as the prime example of honor but the reality is they snitched on one another quite often. Ultimately, TK and Vlad suggest the code is irrational because people will always do what’s in their best self-interest.