New Batman Comic Unveils Robin As Bisexual

In the newest installment of the DC comic “Batman: Urban Legends,” Robin comes out as bisexual.

The sixth issue of the comic ends with Tim Drake, who fights crime as Batman’s famous sidekick Robin, accepting a date with another character, Bernard Dowd. Up until this issue, Robin has always dated women.

“Tim Drake finally coming out is so inspiring, DC never wanted a queer Robin but after years and years of campaigning from writers and fans it finally happened,” one fan tweeted. “A big thank you to Meghan Fitzmartin, Belén Ortega and Alejandro Sánchez for making this moment so beautiful.”

The follow-up issue comes out in December.

Source: The Hill

Vivica A. Fox Almost Didn’t Get Independence Day Role For Dressing Too Stripperish In Audition

In the latest clip, Vivica A. Fox reflected on being cast in The Wayans Brothers’ “Don’t Be Menace.” While speaking about projects she was excited about but failed to really react, she said she felt good about the film because the Wayans were behind it and had a good budget to work with. She later talked about her appearance in “Independence Day” and said she was told she didn’t have a big enough name for the role before one of the producers’ wives suggested her. To hear her explain how she landed the career-changing role, check out the above clip.

Fans Marvel At New ‘Shang-Chi’ Trailer – Making History As First Film In MCU To Center On Asian Lead With Asian Filmmaking Team Behind It

Filled with high-flying action, the first trailer for “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” dropped Monday, just in time for the lead star’s birthday.

The teaser clip introduces the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s first superhero of Asian descent, as played by Simu Liu, known for his work on the sitcom “Kim’s Convenience.” With a cast that includes Awkwafina and Tony Leung, “Shang-Chi” will also have an Asian-led filmmaking team behind it, including director Destin Daniel Cretton and screenwriter David Callaham.

“Shang-Chi” follows the titular superhero as he reckons with his past and present. The movie will introduce Leung as Wenwu, a new character created for the MCU.

Marvel Studios’ president, Kevin Feige, and the film’s producer, Jonathan Schwartz, explained in an interview with Entertainment Weekly that Wenwu has “gone by many names,” including the Mandarin. A villain pretending to be the Mandarin appeared in “Iron Man 3.”

Shang-Chi is based on a ’70s comic-book character called the Master of Kung Fu. In the comics, Shang-Chi’s father trains him in martial arts. He eventually gains formidable skills, all the while unraveling the truth behind his father’s intentions.

Early issues of the comic included racist stereotypes that “Shang-Chi” will correct to tell an authentic story about Asian identity, according to EW.

When “Shang-Chi” wrapped up filming in October, Cretton and Liu took to social media to celebrate the milestone, with Liu writing a message in the private Facebook group “Subtle Asian Traits” on the film’s impact.

“For all of those who hated us because of the color of our skin, or been made to feel less than because of it; NO MORE,” Liu wrote. “This is OUR movie, and it will be IMPOSSIBLE for Hollywood to ignore us after this.”

Fans celebrated the new trailer on social media Monday, noting its importance to the Asian and Asian American communities.

“i never really had an asian hero to admire growing up which made me feel insecure in my skin and ignored, especially as a child,” one fan tweeted.

Source: LA Times

Filmmaker Cynthia Kao Has Concerns Whether Oscar Winning Short “Two Distant Strangers” By Netflix And NowThis News Plagiarized Her Work

Cynthia Kao, producer, filmmaker and comedian, in a TikTok video going viral has pointed out the similarities between a short film she made in 2016 and a short film that recently won an Academy Award.

Without making any direct allegations, Filmmaker Cynthia Kao notes how her film Groundhog Day For A Black Man and Two Distant Strangers, Oscar winner for Best Live Action Short Film, share plot themes while giving her audience an insight into the backstory.

In the aftermath of George Floyd‘s killing and the resultant protests, Kao says she was contacted by publication NowThis News in 2020 for permission to amplify her short film on their platform, owing to its topicality.

‘When a black man lives the same day over and over again, he tries changing his behavior to survive a police interaction,’ reads the description for Kao’s short film Groundhog Day For A Black Man on YouTube.

The permission email, which Kao shows on screen, mentions the channel would give her credit when sharing her film. “They ended up posting it to their Facebook and Twitter page,” Kao says in her TikTok.

“One year after NowThis posts my short, Netflix puts out a short called Two Distant Strangers on April 9, 2021… it’s about a Black man who lives the same day over and over again and tries to survive a police interaction,” she says in her TikTok.

Two Distant Strangers has been directed by Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe, distributed by Netflix and produced in association with companies Dirty Robber, NowThis and Six Feet Over. The film had received critical acclaim upon its release last year November and in April 2021, won an Oscar.

“I don’t know what happened, I’m not making any assumptions,” Kao ends her TikTok video saying.

Kao is a prominent award-winning short film director also known for other titles like If Men Had Periods It Wouldn’t Be Gross and Relationship Status. She currently works for Walt Disney TV Directing Program, as per her website bio.

Ever since her claims went viral, netizens have been outraging against NowThis for allegedly “ripping off” her work and passing it off as an original production. Comments under Two Distant Strangers on YouTube too have amassed multiple allegations against the short’s makers of “stealing” Kao’s idea.

Source: She The People

Eddie Huang Opens Up On Racism Towards Asian Community, Pop Smoke, And Leaving ‘Fresh Off The Boat’

Producer, director & personality Eddie Huang sat down with Ebro in the Morning for an honest conversation about racism against the Asian community following the shooting at massage parlors in Atlanta. He also discussed some of the experiences he has had himself, and its effects in the community.

He also spoke about the passing of Pop Smoke, solidarity among different races in Los Angeles, his decision to leave the show ‘Fresh off the Boat,’ and more.

He directs the film, ‘Boogie’ which is in theaters now.

Chris Hansen On How Scared He Was When First Filming ‘To Catch a Predator’

In this clip, Chris Hansen recalls the first episode of “To Catch a Predator,” and he admits that his nerves were high, as he states, “My heart was in my throat.” Hansen then revealed that everything was set up for the first two episodes- security, transcripts, actors, but there was no police involvement in the show. During the first show, things went as planned with the first two men he confronted, but the third attempt was a little shaky, as Chris grabbed the wrong transcript. Chris added that the third man was also the most aggressive and potentially dangerous. To hear more, including the police getting involved in the third episode, hit the above clip.

Eddie Huang’s Five-Step Guide To Making Your First Movie – His Directorial Debut ‘Boogie’ Is The Street-Level Story Of An Aspiring Chinese-American Basketball Star Being Pulled Between Two Worlds

Make friends: The hardest part of making a movie is paying for it. Every person in your life becomes a potential investor or contributor. I enlisted all my friends. My assistant became my lead, my mom played a fortune teller, [the rapper] Despot was hanging out on set and became a character, half my rec-league basketball team is in the film. I made two of the songs for the soundtrack in Taiwan with dudes I met in the club, others donated locations, and friends of friends became heads of departments. Make friends, then make movies—together.

Practice working with actors:There’s a lot to keep track of as a director, but you can be terrible at everything as long as you do one thing well, and that’s working with actors. Every other department has a dedicated leader who is already incredible at what they do. You can get caught up trying to impress your DP with your knowledge of lenses or your production designer with your collection of fine china, but the only thing you actually have to handle is actors. That is the one thing you can’t fuck up.

The Ja Rule:As Ja once said, “Always there when you call, always on time.” I’ve heard horror stories about production delays, things running over budget, and directors being replaced. Growing up in restaurants, it was never okay to be late, short on the register, or wasteful with food. I brought that restaurant mentality to Boogie and told everyone that the schedule is the schedule and the days are the days. This is what is budgeted and this is what has to get done today. We’re all artists, but we’re also a business. The only way I get to make another film is if this one makes money. We finished principal photography on time and under budget—despite losing an actor to a threesome, where he got cracked over the head with a champagne bottle, amongst other unconscionable circumstances—because we said we would.

Go crazyOn the day you’re shooting a scene, it doesn’t matter how many movies you’ve watched or how many times you’ve storyboarded it, you have to be in it. You have to be with your actors, and on the journey, as a participant. One of my favorite scenes was written on set. One day, we finished early,  so I threw Taylor [Takahashi, who plays the title character] and Jorge [Lendeborg Jr.] back on set, and gave them a deck of Monopoly Deal cards. I told Taylor, “You want to play cards instead of working on this school project because you don’t think school matters.” I told Jorge, “Boogie has basketball, you don’t. The only way you get to college is if you get him to work on this project with you.” It was my favorite scene to shoot because it reaffirmed the magic that can happen when a group of people put aside their fears and get after it.

Go away: After you shoot it, forget it. I spent way too much time editing and only figured the movie out once I stopped watching it. I’ve never had kids, but I do remember telling my parents over and over since the age of 12 to leave me alone, and I imagine that’s how my movie felt.

Source: Interview Magazine