Orange Coast College Professor Emeritus John Upton, Noted Photography Icon, Dies

John Upton, one of the founders of the well-respected photography department at Orange Coast College who taught there for more than 40 years, died on Dec. 7 in Petaluma. He was 88.

Upton died due to complications from lung cancer, the school announced.

A former San Clemente and Laguna Woods resident, Upton had moved to Petaluma two years ago to be closer to his family, his daughter, Sean, said.

“He always had an eye for photography,” Sean Upton said. “The day that I drove him to the hospital, which was just two weeks ago, he was looking out the window appreciating places that he may photograph someday. So, he was always looking through the eye of the lens of the photographer.”

John Upton was born in Iowa and moved to the San Fernando Valley when he was 5 years old, his daughter said. He went to art school in San Francisco, at the California School of the Fine Arts, studying with contemporaries like Ansel Adams and Edward Weston before he was drafted into the U.S. Army during the Korean War in 1953.

Upton came back to Southern California and became a faculty member at Orange Coast College in 1960. He retired in 1999 but continued to teach a gallery class part time for several years.

Upton and his then-wife, Barbara London, published the influential college textbook “Photography” in 1976. There are more than 1.5 million copies in print.

“Things that other people see as common knowledge, John would sort of miss,” said OCC Photography Department Chair Blade Gillissen, a student of Upton’s at the junior college in the 1990s. “He was so tuned into photography. I remember one day trying to talk to him, back when the [Los Angeles] Lakers started doing better again with Kobe [Bryant] and [Shaquille O’Neal]. And he had no idea who I was talking about.”

The gallery class provided joy for Upton later in his life. Gillissen said he and Upton would each drive a van full of students to art galleries and museums throughout Southern California on Saturdays, with Upton acting as a docent.

“I haven’t offered it since he stopped teaching it,” Gillissen said. “I don’t know anyone off the top of my head that could teach it like he did it.”

Sean Upton called her father one of the premier art historians in the U.S. Last January, Orange Coast College opened a survey exhibition of his fine art work at the Frank M. Doyle Arts Pavilion on campus. The exhibit ran until mid-March, when the school was shut down due to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

The survey had selections from four main bodies of work: early work, “Japanalia,” “Jungle Road” and the more recent “Petaluma.” John Upton was an avid fan of Asian art and culture and would visit Japan yearly for decades, Sean Upton said.

The exhibition was curated by Tyler Stallings, director/senior curator at the Doyle.

“He was mainly known as an educator, for the book and what he did for the photography department at OCC,” Stallings said. “He’s always been making work, but as a busy teacher, he didn’t always have the time to get his work out there. That was the angle of the show.”

Later in his life, Upton also collaborated with longtime friend and part-time OCC Photography Department instructor John Hesketh, who would print his photography.

“John was one of the sweetest and most giving people around,” Hesketh said. “I had a commercial father of photography [Dean], and John was kind of my fine art father of photography. He was very, very dedicated to photography itself and what it meant to be a fine art photographer, or an artist that was lens-based … He was like this elder statesman that represented photography in its best, kindest way. He was very generous in encouraging other people to do what they could do.”

Source: LA Times

Fujifilm breaks mirrorless speed record with new f/1.0 lens

Fujifilm has announced a new 50mm X-series lens with an unprecedented f/1.0 aperture. The XF 50mmF1.0 R WR is the world’s first f/1 autofocus lens for mirrorless cameras, according to Fujifilm, and marks the 35th X-series lens the company has produced. Its field of view is about 75mm-equivalent on Fujifilm’s APS-C sensors.

Fujifilm’s previous fastest lens was the 56mm f/1.2, which is the aperture that companies like Canon and Nikon also tend to top out at when designing autofocus lenses. While Canon did make an autofocus 50mm f/1.0 for its DSLRs at one point, it was discontinued decades ago. Nikon and Leica have made f/0.95 lenses before, but they only worked with manual focus. Large apertures allow the user to achieve shallower depth of field and shoot at faster shutter speeds or lower ISO settings.

Source: The Verge

Photography Tips: Full Frame & Crop Sensor Cameras

What is the difference between Full Frame & Crop Sensor? Full Frame or Crop Sensor – which is better? What is the best sensor size? These questions are asked a lot and it can be very confusing.

Both sensor sizes have benefits and potential ‘costs’ attached to them. A full frame has less depth of filed than a crop – so for blurry background portraits a FF will be better, but for big depth of field maybe a crop sensor camera. But that will have less resolution… and so it goes on.

So I’ve distilled it down to the basics to explain the advantages and dis-advantages of both to help you chose which works best for you.

Mike Browne

Canon Issues Statement Regarding Overheating Concerns With New EOS R5 and R6 Cameras When Video Recording

bc97b75b81b05b6b9f61e432865456d6.jpg

In the statement, Canon said that the R5’s combination of high resolution, high video frame rate, high bit rate, and usage of the full width of the sensor all create a lot of heat. In order to combat this, the company used a magnesium alloy body to help dissipate internally generated heat, along with an “overheat control” function for reducing any heat generation while the camera is in standby mode. In addition to these features, the company also clarified that they decided not to install a fan in the R5 because it would have increased its size and weight and compromised its weather resistance.

Source: Fstoppers

Canon’s EOS R5 Is the Brand’s Most Powerful Full-Frame Mirrorless

Screen Shot 2020-05-28 at 3.20.29 PM

Dubbed the EOS R5, the upcoming camera uses a newly-designed image sensor and processor to enable no-crop capture of both 8K and 4K video recordings. The former can be shot in a RAW format while the latter can reach up to 120 frames-per-second, and amazing feat for a camera of this size. All its 8K and 4K modes will support Dual Pixel CMOS AF, and a new advanced animal AF mode has been integrated, which is capable of tracking animal eyes, but also their faces and bodies if the eyes aren’t visible. It boasts five-axis in-body image stabilization which works in tandem with optical image stabilization offered by both RF and EF lenses. Of course, it also carries dual card slots to allow for both a CF card and SD card. Most impressively, Canon has announced a price tag of “under $4,000” USD, an exceptional price for a video recording workhorse with specs which can reportedly outperform the $39,000-USD full-frame Sony Venice.

Source: HypeBeast

The Fujinon 14.5-45mm T2.0 Premier PL Zoom Lens is listed at $99,000 on Adorama

fuj14545mpplIMG_3830

The Fujinon 14.5-45mm T2.0 Premier PL Zoom Lens is made for Super 35mm format film and digital cinema cameras and it will render an ultra-wide to normal angle-of-view. The 14.5-45mm lens comes from Fujinon’s Premier PL family of zoom lenses, which share a 136mm front barrel diameter, a 280deg. focus barrel rotation, gear placement and comparable size and weight. It is designed to enable quick lens changes and provide excellent color and optical quality.

Source: Adorama

Elizabeth Eckford

63gw4mwzfnk31

Screen Shot 2020-01-20 at 8.41.54 PM

Like a boss. 15-year-old Elizabeth Eckford ignoring angry parents & students on her first day integrated into Little Rock High School during desegregation. White teenagers chanted “Two, four, six, eight, we ain’t gonna integrate”. Photos by Will Counts (1957)