McDonald’s Uniforms Are Being Upcycled Into A Runway-Worthy Fashion Line

Not all of us have had the chance to wear the McDonald’s uniform behind the counter, but that doesn’t mean we can’t rock it down the runway.

Finnish brand Vain is working in tandem with McDonald’s Finland to repurpose the fast-food restaurant attire into a collection of 27 stylish pieces for the fashion-hungry to don in their free time.

Vain takes the iconic branding of the Golden Arches and the signature black, red, yellow, and blue uniforms and turns them into something worthy of wearing down the street, or to a McDonald’s themed party. The lineup includes jackets, dresses, button-downs, sweaters, and accessories reimagined in never-before-seen silhouettes of the fast-food chain’s uniforms.

Source: Hypebae

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Adobe Users Working With PANTONE Colors Now Have To Pay To Unlock Them

If you are an avid user of Adobe Photoshop, we may have important news for you. The creative studio is taking away PANTONE’s extensive library of colors, and they now reside behind a paywall on top of your monthly Photoshop subscription come November.

The move was first noticed by artist Iain Anders, who brought it to the attention of other creatives on Twitter. From his observations, users must pay an extra US$21 to access the catalog.

Moreover, you will be met with blacked-out spaces if you browse your current and old projects on the platform, which has used PANTONE’s shades.

Those who have been keeping up with either company would have known that both brands announced last year that they would remove the collection of hues from Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Adobe Color, and the Adobe Capture mobile app.

When the news came out, PANTONE insisted it was not due to a conflict of interest but that Adobe had not updated its software, the colors may have been outdated, and hundreds of new hues were missing from the library.

The move was supposed to take effect in March of this year, but it has been postponed until now.

In a statement, Ashley Still, senior vice president, digital media marketing, strategy & global partnerships at Adobe responds: “As we had shared in June, PANTONE decided to change its business model. Some of the PANTONE Color Books that are pre-loaded in Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign were phased-out from future software updates in August 2022. To access the complete set of PANTONE Color Books, PANTONE now requires customers to purchase a premium license through PANTONE Connect and install a plug-in using Adobe Exchange.”

Source: DesignTAXI

NBA Bans Off-White Cream-Colored Uniforms Due To Effect On TV Screens

The light-colored jersey blends right in with the floorboards—causing problems for digital advertisers.

Just when you thought companies couldn’t possibly shove more advertisements into your eye sockets, technology proved it was possible. Digital (or virtual) ads are promos inserted into media post-production or in real time. They first emerged in video games, then started creeping into TV shows on streaming platforms. And during the pandemic, digital ads began making their way onto the basketball court in NBA broadcasts.

On top of ensuring that nowhere in sports is safe from commercialization, the virtual ads have had at least one other, unintended side effect: They killed a well-loved team uniform. In a green screen-style snafu, certain jerseys were too close in color to the polished wooden floors of NBA arenas. Thus, digital ads ended up distorted by players wearing the offending outfits, as first reported by Paul Lukas, the uniform-obsessed aesthetics aficionado who writes the popular UniWatch newsletter.

Specifically, the proliferation of digital ads forced the Milwaukee Bucks’ to give up their cream-colored jerseys. The uniforms were an alternate used during some games from 2017-2020. The colorway was inspired by the team’s home city nickname (in turn, inspired by a local building material). Fans of the Wisconsin franchise loved the look, according to Lukas who spoke with the Bucks’ chief marketing officer, Dustin Godsey. “It was incredibly well received,” Godsey told Lukas. “It helped us kind of build that Cream City brand.”

But there was a problem. The teams’ sponsors started noticing that players wearing the jerseys were getting in the way of their ads—and reported a “pixelation effect,” said Godsey. As a result, the Milwaukee uniforms (and all cream uniforms) were banned NBA-wide. The move also impacts the Philadelphia 76ers, who’ve had a “parchment” colored uniform variant in rotation for the past three seasons, according to Lukas.

It may seem a small thing, but the off-white prohibition is a clear signal of the growing influence that advertisers are having in the sports league and beyond—and the technology enabling that influence. Ad tech is big business, arguably the biggest business—maybe even the only business.

Source: Gizmodo

Tony Yayo On Kyrie Irving Controversy: My Media Trainer Told Me To Avoid Religion, Politics

In this clip, Tony Yayo reacted to the controversy surrounding Kyrie Irving, and he explained that he was taught in media training to stay away from politics and religion. He added that there’s freedom of speech, but Tony added that you have to be careful not to disrespect people in the public eye. Vlad then explained how New York is unique, and Tony agreed, saying, “Everyone is tough.” Vlad went on to speak about how everyone takes the subway in New York, and they’re forced to be around one another. Tony explained that the best thing about New York is the melting pot of different backgrounds, and he spoke about growing up in Queens around all kinds of people.

None Of The Girls In These Vintage Polaroids Exist—An AI Made Them Up

AI-generated photos of Black goth girls created with Midjourney have captivated viewers across social media with both the alluring scenes they depict and their striking realness. In recent years, imaging software bolstered by machine learning have grown uncanny in their ability to produce detailed works based on simple text prompts. With enough coaxing, models like Midjourney, Stable Diffusion, and DALL-E 2 can generate pieces indistinguishable from what a human artist might create.

All it takes to get started is a concept. Text-to-image generators are trained on massive, detailed image datasets, giving them the contextual basis to create from scratch. Instruct any one of today’s popular AI image models to whip up an imaginary scene and, if all goes well, it’ll do just that. By referencing specific styles in the prompt, like a historical art movement or a particular format of photography, the models can be guided toward more refined results. They’re not perfect, though — as casual users hopping on the AI-image meme trend have found, they have a tendency to miss the mark, often hilariously.

That makes it all the more effective when the AI does get it right. Former MMA fighter and artist Fallon Fox’s AI-generated photos, which have gone viral since she posted them on Twitter and Facebook on Nov. 13, at first glance seem a look into the not-so-distant past. Black girls decked in leather and heavy eyeliner smolder in nearly two dozen snapshots from metal shows in the ‘90s. Except, these concerts never existed and neither did these girls. Midjourney conjured them up.

Fox told Screen Rant she was just trying to “show a representation of people like [herself],” a Black woman, in the metal scene through the AI experiment. She had no idea it would take off the way it did. “I put a lot of references to ‘90s-era Black goths in there,” Fox told Screen Rant regarding the AI art creation process. “I also put the scenery in there, which was of course a heavy metal concert, and I told it to use a specific type of film, which was ‘90s Polaroid. And a lot of other tweaks, too.”

It’s easy, at first, to miss the telltale signs of AI-made images in this photoset, though they eventually become glaring. Hands, in particular, have proven difficult for AI models to render, and many of the characters in the series suffer bizarre failings in this area (which Fox and social media users have been quick to point out): rubbery fingers that fuse with other objects, a multitude of tangled extra digits, out-of-place fingernails.

There are other telling details, too, like eyes that are just off and features that seem to be pasted haphazardly on. In one image, a bystander appears to have the entire lower half of his body on backward. Overwhelmingly, though, the people and places in the photos look real.

Source: Screenrant

After Chaotic Short-Notice Layoffs, Twitter Now Asks Some Fired Workers To Please Come Back

Twitter Inc., after laying off roughly half the company on Friday following Elon Musk’s $44 billion acquisition, is now reaching out to dozens of employees who lost their jobs and asking them to return.

Some of those who are being asked to return were laid off by mistake, according to two people familiar with the moves. Others were let go before management realized that their work and experience may be necessary to build the new features Musk envisions, the people said, asking not to be identified discussing private information.

Twitter cut close to 3,700 people this week via email as a way to trim costs following Musk’s acquisition, which closed in late October. Many employees learned they lost their job after their access to company-wide systems, like email and Slack, were suddenly suspended. The requests for employees to return demonstrate how rushed and chaotic the process was.

A Twitter spokesperson did not reply to a request for comment. Twitter’s plan to hire back workers was previously reported by Platformer.

“Regarding Twitter’s reduction in force, unfortunately there is no choice when the company is losing over $4M/day,” Musk tweeted on Friday.

Twitter has close to 3,700 employees remaining, according to people familiar with the matter. Musk is pushing those who remain at the company to move quickly in shipping new features, and in some cases, employees have even slept at the office to meet new deadlines.

Over the weekend, Twitter rolled out a new Twitter Blue subscription plan, offering a verification check mark for any user who pays $8 a month. The company also said it will soon be launching other features, including half the ads, the ability to post longer videos and get priority ranking in replies, mentions and searches.

The New York Times on Sunday reported Twitter will delay changes to the check marks until after Tuesday’s midterm elections, after users and employees raised concerns that the plan could be misused to sow discord.

Source: Bloomberg