President Donald Trump Mispronounces Thailand As ‘Thighland’ At A Campaign Event, Social Media Users Poke Fun

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Social media users poked fun at President Donald Trump after he mispronounced Thailand as “Thighland” at a campaign event on Thursday.

The blunder occurred at a Whirlpool plant in Ohio, according to the New York Daily News.

In his speech, Trump spoke about how the American manufacturer’s competitors had shifted their “production to ‘Thighland’ and to Vietnam.”

However, he repeated himself and corrected his pronunciation of the Southeast Asian country.

“Thailand and Vietnam, two places that… I like their leaders very much.”

Social media users were quick to catch the slip-up.

Link:

Watch Trump Absolutely Butcher Pronouncing Thailand

TikTok/YouTube stars Alan & Alex Stokes (Stokes Twins) charged with felony after fake Irvine bank robbery pranks that led to police responses at Metropolis Apartments & UC Irvine

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Two 23-year old twins face criminal charges for a prank in which authorities say they staged a fake bank robbery in Irvine that resulted in a police response, including officers holding an unsuspecting Uber driver at gunpoint.

Alan and Alex Stokes, 23, of Irvine each were charged with a felony count of false imprisonment and a misdemeanor count of falsely reporting an emergency, according to the Orange County District Attorney’s Office.

Prosecutors allege that around 2:30 p.m. on Oct. 15, 2019, the brothers – dressed in black, wearing ski masks and carrying duffel bags full of cash – pretended like they had just robbed a bank, while their videographer filmed them.

According to the DA’s office, the brothers ordered an Uber, but the driver – who was unaware of the alleged prank – refused to drive them anywhere. A bystander, believing the two men had robbed a bank and were trying to carjack the driver, called 911.

Irvine officers ordered the Uber driver out of the car at gunpoint, then released him after determining he hadn’t committed a crime. The officers let the Stokes brothers go with a warning, according to the DA’s office.

Prosecutors allege that four hours later the brothers carried out a similar prank on the UC Irvine campus, and officers once again responded to reports of a bank being robbed. The men left before officers arrived.

Link:

TikTok stars Alan and Alex Stokes charged in YouTube prank involving fake Irvine bank robbery

Kraft Heinz (KHC) will rebrand their Kraft Macaroni & Cheese line as a breakfast food

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Kraft wants you to wake up and smell the mac and cheese.

More Americans are eating at home as the pandemic spreads across the United States, and household routines are changing. So Kraft Heinz (KHC) announced Tuesday that it will rebrand its Kraft Macaroni and Cheese Dinner along with its iconic blue box.

It’s not getting a full redesign: The company is just adding the word “breakfast” — instead of dinner — to encourage Americans to start their day with neon orange cheesy noodles.

The company hopes the new “breakfast” label could take away some of the shame that’s associated with parents serving their kids easy-to-make non-breakfast foods in the morning.

Americans are eating at home more during the pandemic, and that’s been good news for Kraft Heinz. The company’s stock is up 9% this year. Breakfast in particular has been a boon for the prepared foods business — and a struggle for restaurants like Starbucks and McDonald’s, which have invested huge amounts of money and resources into luring commuters with coffee and quick-serve food. Fewer people are commuting, and breakfast has become a home meal once again.

Link:

https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/05/business/kraft-mac-and-cheese-breakfast-trnd/

Facebook launches Instagram Reels in 50 countries, hoping to lure TikTok users

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With TikTok’s future uncertain, Instagram is hoping to lure some creators away with the rollout of a direct competitor, Reels, which is launching in more than 50 countries today, including the US, UK, Japan, and Australia, on both iOS and Android.

Similar to TikTok, Reels lets people create short-form videos set to music that can be shared with friends and followers and discovered while browsing the app. It’s the newest opportunity for Instagram to bring in users, increase the amount of time people spend in the app every day, and establish itself as a video entertainment platform.

Reels allows people to record videos up to 15 seconds long and add popular music, as well as an array of filters and effects, over top of them. For creators looking to use Instagram Reels as a new way to build a following, Instagram has revamped its Explore page to create a specific landing spot for Reels at the top of the screen that people can vertically scroll through — similar to TikTok’s “For You Page.”

Link:
https://www.theverge.com/2020/8/5/21354117/instagram-reels-tiktok-vine-short-videos-stories-explore-music-effects-filters

Alyssa Milano roasted after complaining that Joe Rogan’s podcast has more listeners than she does in 22-tweet celebrity temper tantrum

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Joe Rogan entertains millions of listeners with episodes of his podcast “The Joe Rogan Experience,” but not everyone is thrilled about the UFC commentator’s large following.

On Thursday, “Charmed” actress and political activist Alyssa Milano took to Twitter to express her frustrations that “The Joe Rogan Experience” has more listeners than her “Sorry Not Sorry” podcast. As seen in the tweet below, Milano acknowledged that Rogan’s show has three times as many listeners as her own.

Users also noted that the difference in listeners between the two shows could be due to the fact that Rogan’s podcast is over 10 years old, while hers has only been in existence for a little over a year.

Links:
https://www.ibtimes.com/joe-rogans-podcast-has-millions-listeners-alyssa-milano-isnt-happy-about-it-3020615

Alyssa Milano Rips Joe Rogan For Being More Popular Than She Is In 22-Tweet Celebrity Temper Tantrum


Asian Americans face dual challenges: Surging unemployment and racism

 

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A new study from UCLA reports that since the start of the pandemic, 83 percent of the Asian American labor force with high school degrees or lower has filed unemployment insurance claims in California — the state with the highest population of Asian Americans — compared to 37 percent of the rest of the state’s labor force with the same level of education.

At the same time, new research shows that discrimination against Asian Americans is surging. More than 2,300 Asian Americans had reported bias incidents as of July 15, according to the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council, or A3PCON, which hosts the self-reporting tool Stop AAPI Hate.

The UCLA report, published last week, examined the impacts of the coronavirus on the Asian American labor force in California. It revealed that disadvantaged Asians working in service industries have been “severely impacted.”

Researcher Paul Ong, who worked on the report, said that beyond pervasive service industry struggles, he believes people are abandoning Asian establishments because of biases.

“This is why racializing COVID-19 as ‘the China virus’ has profound societal repercussions. We have seen this in the increase in verbal and physical attacks on Asians and in material ways in terms of joblessness and business failures,” he said in an interview.

Link:
https://www.nbcnews.com/news/asian-america/asian-americans-face-dual-challenges-surging-unemployment-racism-n1235356