Fans Marvel At New ‘Shang-Chi’ Trailer – Making History As First Film In MCU To Center On Asian Lead With Asian Filmmaking Team Behind It

Filled with high-flying action, the first trailer for “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” dropped Monday, just in time for the lead star’s birthday.

The teaser clip introduces the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s first superhero of Asian descent, as played by Simu Liu, known for his work on the sitcom “Kim’s Convenience.” With a cast that includes Awkwafina and Tony Leung, “Shang-Chi” will also have an Asian-led filmmaking team behind it, including director Destin Daniel Cretton and screenwriter David Callaham.

“Shang-Chi” follows the titular superhero as he reckons with his past and present. The movie will introduce Leung as Wenwu, a new character created for the MCU.

Marvel Studios’ president, Kevin Feige, and the film’s producer, Jonathan Schwartz, explained in an interview with Entertainment Weekly that Wenwu has “gone by many names,” including the Mandarin. A villain pretending to be the Mandarin appeared in “Iron Man 3.”

Shang-Chi is based on a ’70s comic-book character called the Master of Kung Fu. In the comics, Shang-Chi’s father trains him in martial arts. He eventually gains formidable skills, all the while unraveling the truth behind his father’s intentions.

Early issues of the comic included racist stereotypes that “Shang-Chi” will correct to tell an authentic story about Asian identity, according to EW.

When “Shang-Chi” wrapped up filming in October, Cretton and Liu took to social media to celebrate the milestone, with Liu writing a message in the private Facebook group “Subtle Asian Traits” on the film’s impact.

“For all of those who hated us because of the color of our skin, or been made to feel less than because of it; NO MORE,” Liu wrote. “This is OUR movie, and it will be IMPOSSIBLE for Hollywood to ignore us after this.”

Fans celebrated the new trailer on social media Monday, noting its importance to the Asian and Asian American communities.

“i never really had an asian hero to admire growing up which made me feel insecure in my skin and ignored, especially as a child,” one fan tweeted.

Source: LA Times

Dogecoin Investor Becomes Millionaire After Putting Life Savings Into Meme Crypto

A Dogecoin investor has told Newsweek of how he became a millionaire after investing his life savings in the meme cryptocurrency. Meanwhile, an expert has warned about the risks of doing so.

The 33-year-old Los Angeles resident, who wanted to remain anonymous, claimed he invested all of his $188,000 life savings into it in February this year.

Since then the coin has risen sharply in value as cryptocurrencies in general have grown in popularity, and thanks to support from influential figures such as Elon Musk.

As a result the investor said his initial investment has grown to almost $2 million.

In a video shared with Newsweek, the user showed a screen recording of his Robinhood trading portfolio taken back when Dogecoin was worth $0.05 in February. He concluded the video with: “Clearly the volatility is very high, so I am not a financial advisor, this is not financial advice—purely entertainment.”

He had purchased just over five million of the tokens. Screenshots seen by Newsweek showed the total value had increased to $1,881,533 by Friday morning ET.

The investor first shared the news he had become a millionaire in a Reddit post on Thursday. It gained nearly 70,000 upvotes on the website.

He told Newsweek: “I feel absolutely incredible right now. I grew up very poor, I don’t come from money so I’ve worked dead-end jobs throughout my life to make ends meet.

“I currently have a regular 9 to 5 job right now and I basically live paycheck to paycheck. I also own a super beat-up 2004 Toyota Corolla that has over 200K miles on it and completely falling apart.”

He first started investing in the stock market years ago, incrementally putting bits of his paycheck into shares he thought were undervalued. He also said the rallies on GameStop shares earlier this year following investment by Reddit users influenced his outlook.

Source: Newsweek

2019 – George Takei On His Memoir, “They Called Us Enemy”

2019 – Veteran actor George Takei may be best known as Sulu from “Star Trek,” but he also has a darker story to tell. During World War II, thousands of Americans of Japanese descent were forced from their homes and sent to internment camps, Takei among them. Now at 82 years old, he says that the Trump administration’s treatment of immigrants motivated him to speak out and revisit this in a new memoir.

Six Homeless People Were Paid To Fill Disposable Cameras During UK Lockdowns, With Images Now Going On Display In London Exhibition

An exhibition showcasing photographs from homeless people during the UK’s coronavirus lockdowns has given them an income boost and provided an “utterly unique” perspective on the pandemic.

Out Of Home was devised by photography hobbyist Dan Barker and his wife Lucy Wood, whose photographs have featured in the Royal Academy.

The couple paid six people £20 for each camera they filled with photographs.

The pictures, taken from largely empty streets across usually bustling London, are now on display in an outdoor exhibition at St Martin-in-the-Fields.

The images are also being sold as individual prints and have even been compiled into a 65-page book.

The profits from all these uses will go to the photographers, with a portion also going to the church near Trafalgar Square, to aid its work in helping the homeless.

“The work they’ve produced is utterly unique… people like you and me showing what life has been like, without a home, at a time we were all told to ‘stay at home’,” Mr Barker told the PA news agency.

Joe Pengelly, a homeless man based in Covent Garden, would usually sell The Big Issue but was unable to due to coronavirus restrictions.

Instead he has been reliant on a combination of the £300 he receives each month in benefits and begging on predominantly empty streets.

“Obviously, the income’s a good thing, but it’s not the main thing… now I’ll get known for something other than just begging or being homeless,” the 32-year-old told PA.

“There’s another side to me, and hopefully people will see that… there’s another side to everyone on the streets.”

Mr Pengelly has been staying in a hostel for £120 per month during the pandemic, but he said the temporary accommodation is “the sort of place that can kick you out without an excuse”.

“When the lockdown started it was a nightmare… it was like a nuclear bomb had wiped out all but a tenth of London’s population,” Mr Pengelly added.

“(The hostel) might sort a roof over your head, but it still doesn’t sort out where, where you’re going to get any finance from.”

Mr Pengelly said he was most proud of a photograph he took of three police officers in high-visibility jackets as they asked him to move along.

He also picked out a perspective shot taken while he was reading a book on the street in his sleeping bag.

Government statistics show the average age of death for a homeless woman in the UK is 43, and Mr Barker said Kelly’s death highlights the difficulties of living on the streets, which have been exacerbated by the pandemic.

Another man who took part, Darren Fairbrass, said the public’s perceptions of homeless people changed during the pandemic.

“People have changed… they seemed to think because I’m homeless and sleeping on the streets that I must have this Covid virus,” the 37-year-old said.

“People seemed to get scared if I was to approach them. Thankfully there were still a few that treated me as if I was a human still, and stopped, even just for a chat.”

Mr Fairbrass said life “completely disappeared” from central London during the lockdown, but the cameras made life easier and provided for him and his dog, Indie.

“I’ve lost count how many cameras I have actually filled, I just know it’s a lot and have had fun doing them and made life out here a bit easier,” he added.

Those who took part in the project were told to take pictures of things they find interesting, and not to spend more than one hour and 45 minutes on it each day – to ensure the work was paid at the London Living Wage.

They were given one camera per day, but this was flexible where pay could help, and altogether thousands of photographs were taken.

The exhibition Out Of Home is free and open from Thursday to Sunday and on bank holidays.

Source: Shropshire Star

Filmmaker Cynthia Kao Has Concerns Whether Oscar Winning Short “Two Distant Strangers” By Netflix And NowThis News Plagiarized Her Work

Cynthia Kao, producer, filmmaker and comedian, in a TikTok video going viral has pointed out the similarities between a short film she made in 2016 and a short film that recently won an Academy Award.

Without making any direct allegations, Filmmaker Cynthia Kao notes how her film Groundhog Day For A Black Man and Two Distant Strangers, Oscar winner for Best Live Action Short Film, share plot themes while giving her audience an insight into the backstory.

In the aftermath of George Floyd‘s killing and the resultant protests, Kao says she was contacted by publication NowThis News in 2020 for permission to amplify her short film on their platform, owing to its topicality.

‘When a black man lives the same day over and over again, he tries changing his behavior to survive a police interaction,’ reads the description for Kao’s short film Groundhog Day For A Black Man on YouTube.

The permission email, which Kao shows on screen, mentions the channel would give her credit when sharing her film. “They ended up posting it to their Facebook and Twitter page,” Kao says in her TikTok.

“One year after NowThis posts my short, Netflix puts out a short called Two Distant Strangers on April 9, 2021… it’s about a Black man who lives the same day over and over again and tries to survive a police interaction,” she says in her TikTok.

Two Distant Strangers has been directed by Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe, distributed by Netflix and produced in association with companies Dirty Robber, NowThis and Six Feet Over. The film had received critical acclaim upon its release last year November and in April 2021, won an Oscar.

“I don’t know what happened, I’m not making any assumptions,” Kao ends her TikTok video saying.

Kao is a prominent award-winning short film director also known for other titles like If Men Had Periods It Wouldn’t Be Gross and Relationship Status. She currently works for Walt Disney TV Directing Program, as per her website bio.

Ever since her claims went viral, netizens have been outraging against NowThis for allegedly “ripping off” her work and passing it off as an original production. Comments under Two Distant Strangers on YouTube too have amassed multiple allegations against the short’s makers of “stealing” Kao’s idea.

Source: She The People