Tropicana Is Dropping A New Breakfast Cereal ‘Made For OJ’

In celebration of National Orange Juice Day, juice company Tropicana is expanding its product portfolio – and hoping to catch the eye of younger consumers via a new push on social media – with the upcoming release of Tropicana Crunch.

Orange juice has long been a breakfast staple, but most of us prefer it in a glass. Now Tropicana is shaking things up by encouraging consumers to try orange juice directly on top of their cereal.

The juice company has just announced the upcoming release of Tropicana Crunch, its new breakfast cereal, which has been created specifically to be paired with orange juice instead of milk. According to the brand, this is an untraditional culinary combo that 15 million Americans – ”the total populations of New York City, Los Angeles and Chicago combined” – have already tried.

Tropicana Crunch is slated for release on May 4, National Orange Juice Day in the United States. Consumers can visit http://www.tropicanacrunch.com beginning on May 4 to snag their own box of the honey almond-flavored cereal.

Even the brand acknowledges on its new product’s website that Tropicana Crunch is a bit of an oddity that may not immediately become a culture-wide phenomenon. “Orange juice on cereal. Some call it weird. Some call it breakfast. We… didn’t even know it was a thing,” the brand says on the Tropicana Crunch website. “It may not be for everyone (but it could be for you!).”

The brand hopes to boost engagement with fans after the release of its new breakfast cereal with an accompanying social media campaign. Whether they “loved it or loathed it,” the brand says, fans are encouraged to describe their experience with Tropicana Crunch on Instagram and TikTok while tagging the brand and using the hashtag #TropicanaCrunch. The brand has also recruited a cohort of “TikTok’s top taste-test influencers” to try the OJ-drenched product and spread the word to their legions of followers.

Source: The Drum

Cracker Jack Introduces ‘Cracker Jill’: A Fresh Face For Empowering Female Athletes

Cracker Jack is celebrating the groundbreaking achievements of female athletes by introducing ‘Cracker Jill,’ a new series of female characters that will appear on product packaging beginning later this week. The announcement of the campaign is accompanied by a new spin on the old classic Take Me Out to the Ballgame – which calls out Cracker Jack by name – performed by pop star Normani.

“Cracker Jack has been around for over a century,” said Tina Mahal, vice-president of marketing at PepsiCo, Frito-Lay’s parent company. “This brand has been around for a lot of moments, specifically in sports. [It’s] been around as records were made and as rules have changed. And as we’ve seen rules change, we’ve seen a big transformation happening; throughout sports, girls and women are really changing the face of the game. Because of that change, and because of our connection with sports, we thought it was high time that we introduced Cracker Jill … what we’re trying to do is really shine a light on representation of women in sports, and show women that they are represented, they’re acknowledged and they’re celebrated on even some of the most iconic sets.”

The Cracker Jill campaign features a line-up of five female characters, designed to reflect the five most represented ethnicities in the United States.

The new initiative will include a $200,000 donation to the Women’s Sports Foundation (WSF), a non-profit organization founded in 1972 by Billie Jean King, which aims “to expand access and opportunities for girls and women in sports,” according to the organization’s website.

Bags of Cracker Jill will be exclusively available in Major League Baseball stadiums beginning on April 7, the opening day of the league’s 2022 season. Fans can also visit crackerjill.com to make a donation to the WSF, upon which they’ll receive a special-edition Cracker Jill bag.

Cracker Jill wasn’t designed to serve a limited-edition role, though. “The intention is for Jill to join Sailor Jack as a permanent member of the team roster,” Cracker Jack said in a statement. “She’ll fully remain part of the brand ethos as Cracker Jack and Frito-Lay continue their commitment to equity and representation.”

The new campaign includes a modernized cover of Take Me Out to the Ballgame produced by Normani – previously a member of the pop group Fifth Harmony – in partnership with the Cracker Jack team. The new music video opens with text that reads: “Sometimes all it takes to believe you can do something is to see someone who looks like you do it first.” Following a montage depicting young women breaking barriers in a variety of sports, the video cuts to a shot of Normani standing in front of a microphone on a baseball diamond. “Buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jill,” she sings. “No one can stop you if you have the will.”

“One of the most well-known ways that Cracker Jack is associated with baseball and with sports is through that seventh inning stretch and the song Take Me Out to the Ballgame,” Mahal says. “The lyrics that are in there – ‘buy me some peanuts and Cracker Jack’ – are woven into the culture of the country and the fabric of baseball. We thought we would tap into that cultural connection … and so we partnered with Normani, someone [who] is a trailblazer in her own right … to update that song. She reimagined the lyrics along with our Cracker Jack team to really celebrate the tenacity and grit of women and girls in sports.”

Source: The Drum

“You Can Steal Our Images, But You’ll Never Steal Our Taste” — KFC Launches ‘ChickenStock.Net’ Image Library For Others To Steal Their High-Resolution Photos, For Free

Success invites imitation, and there is little doubt that international QSR brand Kentucky Fried Chicken—or KFC if brevity is more your thing—has ruled the roost when it comes to tasty morsels of deep-fried poultry and sides. So many copycats have hatched over the years that KFC has decided to address the phenomenon again with a cheeky website called Chicken Stock.

Styled after popular stock photography websites, Chicken Stock offers free-to-use high-resolution images of KFC’s menu items. On Chicken Stock’s about page, the QSR brand explained that it had noticed many competitors using fuzzy, pixelated pictures of its signature chicken. Rather than let its food get poorly represented, they’re making available quality photography. KFC explains that “even though they [competitors] can borrow our pictures, they will never borrow our taste.”

It’s not the first time KFC has used copycats to remind folks of the real deal, made with a secret blend of 11 herbs and spices. In 2019, the brand ran its “Guys, we’re flattered” campaign that featured a clever poster composed of different imitators’ store signs arranged alphabetically, in addition to TV advertising.

While the Colonel takes no umbrage with all the Kentucky Fake Chickens, there is a limit, of course. In 2013, the brand threatened to take legal action against a Thailand restaurant with a trade dress styled after KFC’s that replaced Sanders with Adolf Hitler.

Source: The Dieline

Burger King’s New “Sorry For The Confusion” Posters Want To Trick Meat Eaters Into Trying Plant-Based Food

Burger King’s latest campaign with David Madrid is confusing meat lovers as it continues to reinforce its commitment to offering plant-based alternatives.

‘Meat?’ plays on the visual similarities between animal-based products and meat-free options with a striking, very close up series of print and out-of-home (OOH) ads with the tagline: “Sorry for the confusion, meat lovers”

On closer inspection of the ad imagery, meat lovers may be surprised to realize they are actually looking at red pepper, beetroot and radicchio.

“Many times, guests can’t tell the difference between the traditional Whopper and the plant-based Whopper,” said André Toledo, executive creative director at David Madrid.

“So we challenged a food photographer and a food stylist to shoot some vegetables in a way that would make them look like meat. The idea was to create ads that would make people ask themselves ‘Wait, is this meat or is this a plant?’”

“At Burger King, our plant-based products often feel, taste and look like real meat; yet many guests are skeptical,” added Iwo Zakowski, head of global brand marketing at Burger King.

“We wanted to bring a visually powerful message that makes you reconsider that not everything in life is what it seems to be. At Burger King, there is always something on the menu for everyone.”

Source: The Drum

Wendy’s Rips Into McDonald’s French Fries In Savage New Billboard

Fast-food rivalries have been longstanding, and perhaps no rivalry has been more fun to watch over social media than that between Wendy’s and McDonald’s.

From Wendy’s savagely slamming the Golden Arches on Twitter over the seemingly forever broken ice cream machines to the former calling its new hot honey chicken sandwich “anything but McBland,” it’s safe to say that the two know how to riff each other when it comes to who reigns supreme.

Wendy’s latest not-so-subtle campaign is taking it one step further, and it looks like social media has caught on rather quickly.

Over the past few months, Wendy’s has put billboards up around Chicago advertising its famous French fries after the recipe was reformulated in August 2021 to maintain a fresher and crispier consistency upon delivery.

“What we’ve done is balance the cut of the fry and kept a little bit of the skin of the potato on the fry to be able to drive flavor,” Wendy’s President Kurt Kane said at the time. “We used a batter system that allows us to be able to maintain crispiness, both when they’re fresh and hot out of the fryer as well as several minutes later.”

The billboards read “hot and crispy fries don’t arch, just sayin’” alongside a photo of a folded fry that has an uncanny resemblance to half of the “M” in the famous McDonald’s Golden Arches symbol.

Naturally, Twitter took note and had a field day with it.

“I have tears in my eyes from laughing so much,” one user commented below one of the billboard photos. “I love how savage @Wendys is.”

“Twitter’s not enough..so we’re taking it to the streets now, huh, Wendy’s,” another joked alongside a crying laughing emoji.

Wendy’s even tweeted back a sly face emoji at one of the original posters, playing along with the social media fodder.

The fast-food chain still maintains that their fries are preferred 2:1 to McDonald’s.

Your move, Mickey D’s.

Wendy’s was up 12.59% year over year as of Friday afternoon.

Source: Entrepreneur

Sofia Jirau Becomes Victoria’s Secret’s First Model With Down Syndrome

Sofía Jirau has officially made history, becoming the first Victoria’s Secret model with Down syndrome.

The 24-year-old Puerto Rican model shared the news on social media, joining the fashion brand — along with 17 other women — for a new underwear line and campaign, Love Cloud Collection. Alongside a black and white photo of herself modeling a Victoria’s Secret bra, Jiaru thanked the company for seeing her as a model “without limits.”

“One day I dreamed of it, I worked for it and today it’s a dream come true. I can finally tell you my big secret,” Jirau wrote. “I am Victoria’s Secret’s first model with Down syndrome!”

“Thank you Victoria’s Secret for seeing me as a model who has #NoLimits and making me part of the inclusive Love Cloud Collection campaign,” she added. “Inside and out, there are no limits.”

“Love Cloud Collection is a major moment in the brand’s evolution,” Raúl Martinez, Victoria Secret’s chief creative director, said in a statement. “From the cast of incredible women that bring the collection to life, to the incredible inclusive spirit on set, this campaign is an important part of the new Victoria’s Secret standard we are creating.” 

Source: People

PepsiCo To Launch Hemp Seed-Infused Drink Under Rockstar Energy

PepsiCo’s latest drink from Rockstar Energy wants to help consumers chill out.

Infused with hemp seed oil, spearmint, lemon balm and only about 80 milligrams of caffeine, Pepsi is hoping to attract younger, female consumers with the drink. Men between the ages of 18 and 34 years consume the most energy drinks, according to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health.

“It’s a combination of herbals that can help us to relax, but not to sleep,” said Fabiola Torres, PepsiCo general manager and chief marketing officer of its energy business.

Other iterations of Rockstar drinks contain anywhere from 160 milligrams to 300 milligrams of caffeine.

Rockstar Unplugged will be available in slimmer 12-ounce cans in three flavors: blueberry, passion fruit and raspberry cucumber. Beginning Tuesday, the beverage will be available nationwide, starting at $1.99 per can.

This isn’t Rockstar’s first foray into hemp. In April, the brand launched Rockstar Energy + Hemp in Germany. PepsiCo CEO Ramon Laguarta told analysts that month that the German test was specific to that country, which has a sizable hemp market. Torres said Rockstar Unplugged’s formula is quite different, using half the amount of caffeine than the German beverage.

While many consumers may think of hemp seed as synonymous with CBD, there are some differences. Both come from hemp plants, but hemp seed has little to no CBD. It also has much less dramatic effects when consumed.

″[Hemp seed] doesn’t have any functionality, it comes from an herb,” Torres said. “Imagine you’re drinking an herbal tea, with caffeine. That’s it.”

It’s currently illegal for companies to sell CBD-infused food and beverages across state lines, keeping large players like Pepsi and its rival Coca-Cola out of the fray. A number of smaller players with less to lose have introduced their own CBD drinks, but the category remains tiny. Only 1.8% of Americans purchased a CBD drink in the last three months of 2021, according to Brightfield Group.

Hemp seed-infused food and drinks have no such ban in the U.S., but they have failed to catch on like in Germany or other markets.

“This is new territory, so we’re trying to test and learn and really have fun with it,” Torres said.

Perkins Coie served as an advisor to PepsiCo on legal compliance for its use of hemp seed oil.

Shares of Pepsi have climbed 26% over the last 12 months, giving it a market value of $239 billion.

Source: CNBC

Adidas Shares Bare-Chested Advertisement And #SupportIsEverything Campaign For New Extensive Range Of Sports Bras: ‘It’s Important To Normalize The Human Body’

Adidas just released a bold new ad for their new sports bra collection.

On Feb. 9, the retailer took to Twitter to share a grid photo of 25 different pairs of bare breasts as a way to illustrate how every body is different.

“We believe women’s breasts in all shapes and sizes deserve support and comfort,” Adidas captioned the post. “Which is why our new sports bra range contains 43 styles, so everyone can find the right fit for them.”

They also linked out to the new collection, alongside the hashtag #SupportIsEverything.

The reactions to the new ad on Twitter were mixed. Some celebrated the message, with one Twitter user writing, “This is major. Well done Adidas!” Another shared, “As a father of two daughters that played sports this is way overdue. Thank you. A lot of girls give up sports because they can’t find the right fit to stay comfortable.”

However, not everyone was as thrilled. One person wrote, “I’m all for boobies and positivity but like … what are they selling? Shouldn’t it at least show how their ‘body-positive’ bras support all different kinds of boobies? Or is this just another shock ad designed only to generate revenue by using women’s bodies? Exhausting.”

The same user then tweeted a photo of Adidas’s collection, which features women of relatively the same size and shape.

Another added, “It’s just a REALLY good thing I didn’t scroll by this while in an office setting. And, yes, I believe the human body is beautiful, it doesn’t mean I need or want to see the parts meant for their husbands and babies.”

The brand defended their ad in several follow-up tweets, writing, “It’s important to normalize the human body and help inspire future generations to feel confident and unashamed.”

They also added, “It’s perfectly natural to have breasts. We are happy to celebrate that and won’t be taking this down so we can keep doing so,” and, “We want future generations to feel body-confident, which is why this gallery is so important to share.”

Adidas isn’t the first major company to make a push for inclusivity. Recently, Victoria’s Secret underwent a major rebranding campaign, in which they launched the VS Collective — a group of individuals like Priyanka Chopra, Megan Rapinoe, Bella Hadid, Amanda de Cadenet and Adut Akech — to replace their Victoria’s Secret Angels. The push was made to honor the diversity of bodies, ethnicities and genders.

Source: Yahoo

Flamin’ Hot Cheetos And Doritos Tease New Super Bowl Ad And A Mysterious Celebrity Spokesperson

Flamin’ Hot has its first ever Super Bowl ad on the way, and they’ve recruited a flamin’ hot celebrity spokesperson to help them celebrate!

Frito-Lay, the company behind the über-popular flavor, is bringing two of its iconic brands together — Cheetos and Doritos — for the new Flamin’ Hot spot, highlighting Cheetos Flamin’ Hot Crunchy and the new Doritos Flamin’ Hot Cool Ranch.

PEOPLE has an exclusive first look at the commercial, and the A-List superstar talent holding the spicy, cheese-flavored snacks for the camera.

Right now, the identity of the spokesperson is being kept under wraps, though there are plenty of clues to get the guessing going.

In the photos, the mysterious celeb’s hand is decked in bling. A diamond bracelet hangs from their wrist, while one pic features a sparkling braided ring and another, a golden ring seemingly made up of stacked yellow diamond bands.

The secret star’s nails make a statement, too, with bright red tips studded in red gems.

This is one of the first Super Bowl ads to be teased this year.

The big game, Super Bowl LVI, will take place on Feb. 13 at the SoFi Stadium in Los Angeles.

While sports fans are weeks away from finding out who will be playing, it’s been announced that Dr. Dre is headlining the Pepsi Super Bowl Halftime Show, with EminemMary J. BligeKendrick Lamar and Snoop Dogg making guest appearances.

“The opportunity to perform at the Super Bowl Halftime show, and to do it in my own backyard, will be one of the biggest thrills of my career,” Dre in a press release when news came out back in September. “I’m grateful to JAY-Z, Roc Nation, the NFL, and Pepsi as well as Snoop Dogg, Eminem, Mary J. Blige and Kendrick Lamar for joining me in what will be an unforgettable cultural moment.”

Frito-Lay’s Flamin’ Hot flavor was first introduced as Flamin’ Hot Cheetos, the product making it out to test markets in the summer of 1990 before being launched nationwide in early 1992.

Richard Montañez — who began working for Frito-Lay as a janitor — has long said he created the product, telling Variety he came up with the idea during one of Frito-Lay’s “method improvement programs” where they looked for new ideas and fresh products. He later tested out the seasoning for the Cheetos in his garage.

Frito-Lay’s subsidiary PepsiCo later clarified to PEOPLE that they attribute “the launch and success of Flamin’ Hot Cheetos and other products to several people who worked at PepsiCo, including Richard Montañez.”

“Far from being an urban legend, Richard had a remarkable 40-plus-year career at PepsiCo and made an incredible impact on our business and employees and continues to serve as an inspiration today,” the statement read. “His insights and ideas on how to better serve Hispanic consumers were invaluable and directly resulted in the success of Flamin’ Hot Cheetos.”

Montañez has gone on to write two books about his success, spoken about it in multiple engagements, and even will see his life told on the big screen in an upcoming biopic.

And the beloved spicy snack food has since inspired a sea of unique food offerings — like Flamin’ Hot Cheetos Mac n’ Cheese, Flamin’ Hot Cheetos Mountain Dew, and Taco Bell’s Flamin’ Hot Cheetos Taco Shells — as well as a seemingly never-ending list of at-home recipes involving the product, including sushi rollschicken fingersmozzarella sticks, and even macarons.

Source: People