International Student At ESSEC Business School In Singapore Sparks Outrage With Racist Instagram Posts

A foreign student studying abroad in Singapore faced massive backlash this past weekend after a photograph that she posted on Instagram for Chinese New Year earlier in 2020 went viral for all the wrong reasons.

The student, Louise, has since issued an apology on her now-private Instagram account, and Essec Business School, where she studies, has said that they are “looking into the situation”.

On Friday (Dec. 4), Instagram user @beforeik.o posted a screenshot of an Instagram story she had made of Louise’s post, which showed the French student pulling back her eyes with her fingers into a slit shape while wearing a cheongsam.

@beforeik.o’s Instagram post also included a screenshot of another photo posted by Louise for Chinese New Year, which included the words “ching chong” in the caption.

A person also commented, “So chong!! So coronavirus!!”

In her Instagram post, @beforeik.o also shared several screenshots of direct messages (DMs) in which Louise claimed that she was “clearly not racist” and that the photo was “just for fun”.

Louise pointed to the fact that Chinese people may get surgery on their eyes to have more “European” features, and asked whether that would be considered racism.

@beforeik.o replied that Louise should educate herself, remove the post, and apologise “before this whole thing blows up”.

Louise, however, doubled down and claimed to have a master’s degree, as well as a diploma from Harvard University about ethnicity in the workplace.

On Saturday (Dec. 5), the official Instagram page of Essec Business School commented on @beforeik.o’s Instagram post, writing that they are “looking into the situation and will take appropriate action”.

Source: Mothership

Sherwin-Williams Fires Ohio University Senior And TikTok Star Tony Piloseno For Filming Paint-Mixing Videos At Work

An Ohio University senior who worked a part-time job at a local Sherwin-Williams store was fired after the company discovered his popular paint-mixing TikTok channel @tonesterpaints, which currently has over 1.2 million followers.

Tony Piloseno said that for months he’d been pointing to his viral account as an example of what Sherwin-Williams could do on social media and by marketing its brand to a younger audience.

But instead it led corporate personnel to investigate his social media account, and they ultimately fired him after determining he was making “these videos during [his] working hours” and with company equipment.

According to termination papers Piloseno provided to BuzzFeed News, the official offense the company handed down to him was “gross misconduct,” which included the offenses of “wasting properties [and] facilities,” and “seriously embarrass[ing] the Company or its products.”

“They first accused me of stealing — I told them I purchased all my paint,” he said. “They made me answer a bunch of questions like when I was doing this, where, if there was anyone in the store while I was doing [filming]. There was never anyone with me while I doing it.”

Source: BuzzFeed News

A More Diverse Workplace Is Good for Society, and for Business — Creative Director Justin LaBaw-Rivers’ Experience as an African American Graphic Designer

1_j-bno8SwCRFQ4VCykkCbUg.png

Nonette Llabres spoke with Justin about his solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, his experience as an African American designer, the need for more diversity in agency leadership roles, and taking inspired action to balance working for yourself and making a difference in the world.

It’s very common to not have enough diversity, especially in the traditional creative agency world. One figure I’ve seen is that only 10% of workers on agency teams are people of color.

All of them want the same thing as I do — we want to create really dope products that can change the world and work with fun people at the same time.

Uber and Lyft just avoided a shutdown. How they got here and what’s next

download.jpeg

The warnings are the result of California’s efforts to bring gig economy companies in compliance with state labor law — a clash that threatened to come to a head this week.

An emergency stay granted Thursday by a California appeals court temporarily defused the situation, allowing Uber and Lyft to continue operating under their current model for the time being. But unless a resolution is reached, millions of Californians who use Uber and Lyft to hail rides may yet find themselves forced to resort to other modes of transportation.

In early August, a San Francisco Superior Court judge ordered the companies to classify their drivers as employees rather than independent contractors, building in a 10-day window for the companies to appeal the move. With that window closing Thursday night, Uber and Lyft had threatened to shut down services at midnight Thursday, saying they cannot transition their business models quickly enough. Lyft reiterated that threat in a blog post Thursday morning, saying: “This is not something we wanted to do.”

“Uber and Lyft are threatening to kill jobs in California. I believe the companies are trying to force us into a decision around giving them what they want, and that’s Prop. 22, which is to keep denying us basic labor protections and benefits we have earned,” said Cherri Murphy, a ride-hailing company driver for about three years. An Oakland resident, Murphy is also an organizer with labor groups Gig Workers Rising and Rideshare Drivers United, which have fought to win protections for drivers.

Uber pushed back on this assessment, saying many drivers prefer to remain independent contractors. “The vast majority of drivers want to work independently, and we’ve already made significant changes to our app to ensure that remains the case under California law. When over 3 million Californians are without a job, our elected leaders should be focused on creating work, not trying to shut down an entire industry during an economic depression,” Uber spokesman Davis White said in a statement.

“Fortunately, California voters can make their voices heard by voting yes on Prop. 22 in November,” Zimmer said, and if passed, the measure “would protect driver independence and flexibility, while providing historic new benefits and protections.”

San Francisco’s district attorney sued food delivery app DoorDash in June, alleging worker misclassification. Uber said it anticipates a similar fight on this front.

Source: LA Times

Aspiring Model Victoria Hoynes Gets 20 Months in Jail For Falsely Accusing Asian Cab Drivers of Rape

Prosecutor Shaun Dodds said: ‘On the camera she can be seen approaching the taxi and exiting it. A reflection shows the driver looking at his mobile phone and she gets out unaided. There is clearly no contact whatsoever and the rape simply did not take place.

Adam Birkby, for Hoynes, said: ‘She accepted full responsibility for the false allegations and wishes to make it clear through me that the two drivers are totally innocent and apologises to them and their families. She offers a sincere public apology and she is extremely remorseful.’

Both suspected drivers spoke of the effect it had on their livelihood and family life, while the lead investigator said Hoynes’ actions may deter future rape victims from reporting crimes.

Jailing her for 20 months, Judge James Adkin said: ‘This type of offence can affect the prospects at trial of cases where it may be finely balanced as to whether women get the justice they deserve.’

Source: Daily Mail

Beauty Products CEO Larry Gaynor Goes on Racist Rant Over Vietnamese Nail Salons in Webinar Meeting, Calls Vietnamese People Enemies and Mocks Vietnamese Language

A beauty entrepreneur has sparked outrage after referring to Vietnamese salons as the “biggest enemy” in the nail business, claiming that their practices do nothing but “destroy” the industry.

“I cannot support any partner that supports the Vietnamese,” said Larry Gaynor, who founded TNG Worldwide in 1985 and currently serves as its president and chief executive officer.

Gaynor reportedly made his comments in a recent webinar for “Diamond Partners” — owners of beauty businesses awarded with benefits for their loyalty to TNG products.

In his tirade, the entrepreneur criticized Vietnamese salons for their sanitation, pricing, and “the way they talk,” in which he used a mock accent to convey his point.

Source: NextShark

How to Protect Yourself from Bad Clients

The dream client rarely exists. So when we do find someone who wants to hire us, we think, “I can make this work.” But we overlook the potential problems and unexpected costs they might create. In this clip, Emily Cohen explains what red flags to look out for in clients and how to protect yourself when you do work with them.

Boston University grad student Kristin Hugo required to pay ~$6,000 to work a summer internship

Screen Shot 2020-02-20 at 1.20.38 PM.png

Kristin, along with other students in her master’s program, was expected to pay her university thousands of dollars to work a summer internship at a separate institution in a different city.

At BU, I often felt like, You guys are always trying to reach into my back pocket, what is the deal? For a while I thought it was kind of sinister, but the school is technically a non-profit institution. Still, the year I was there the president made $2.48 million. It was like, C’mon, I’m eating out of trash here!

To me, the weirdest part about this whole thing is that schools charging students to intern is actually kind of common. It’s wonderful that people are starting to pay attention to the exploitation of interns as free labor, but it seems that few people have issues with universities charging people to do them.

Source: Vice