Donald Trump’s ‘Truth Social’ Platform Finally Works On The Web — Yes, It’s Terrible

The more Forbes journalist John Brandon uses Truth Social, the more he realizes it’s a terrible Twitter clone.

Case in point — just try using the new web version.

Recently, the service finally launched as more than a mere landing page to register for an account. Like you could with Twitter.com more than a decade ago, it is now possible to send your “truths” out to the masses — all 500,000 of them — from a browser tab.

On the web, TruthSocial.com now lets you search for “truths” and participate in the online discourse without a phone, even if it’s all quite basic. Other than calling tweets “truths” instead, there’s nothing particularly novel or interesting about the platform.

You can also configure alerts, view your profile, and adjust a few settings. For example, you can change whether GIFs play automatically in your feed and hide sensitive material. The web interface allows you to mute and block other users, or tag them easily when you post. The web version doesn’t appear to offer a way to see direct messages, though.

Overall, it’s clean enough and simple to use, but also not at all innovative. John mentioned this before, but Truth Social looks exactly like something a developer would make if they were asked to build an app that does only the Twitter basics and nothing more.

Let’s be clear about something when it comes to Truth Social: John Brandon is not analyzing it as a political venture alone. It is definitely part of an elaborate re-election campaign. He has issues with that, not in terms of his own political views but due to the sketchy nature of having a dedicated social media platform meant only for one candidate. If it’s a campaign app, then great. If it isn’t, why does it exist?

Apart from using the word “truths” the real issue is that this is a clone, and that means there’s no real reason to switch from Twitter to this app.

Now that it works on the web, it makes it a bit easier to check your feed, but with 500.000 users, it makes me wonder why anyone would bother. With that smaller group of users, it’s less likely your post will catch on and reach a wider audience, unless you are related by blood to Donald Trump or you’re a celebrity.

Curiously, the only reason John discovered to use Truth Social is because you can see posts from The Babylon Bee, a satire site that was banned from Twitter.

At least Trump himself is posting now, typically with the same outrageous flare he used when he was active on Twitter. Many of his posts are about Hillary Clinton for some reason.

Another surprise is that there isn’t an Android version yet. John knows from personal experience that getting an app launched on Android can be troublesome. One report suggests Truth Social has not even submitted an Android version yet to the Google Play store. Trump claims the reason the app is not approved has something to do with Google being out to get him.

What could really attract attention?

John Brandon would suggest offering some unique features, perhaps a few that are not available on Twitter.

Source: Forbes

Google Domains Is Finally Out Of Beta After Seven Years And Is Offering A 20% Registration Discount

Google’s domain registration service entered public beta in January of 2015. It’s now exiting beta into general availability in 26 countries, and Google Domains is marking the occasion with a discount.  

Google Domains, which has a nifty icon consisting of a dot and slash, says it has millions of active registrations and aims to be the “easiest place to find, buy and manage a domain.” Long beta periods are a hallmark of Google services, with Gmail’s lasting five years.

It offers over 300 domain endings and touts integration with other Google services, especially for business owners. For example, you don’t have to verify TXT records when integrating a website with Search Console, Google App Engine, or Cloud Run. There’s also the ability to add Workspace to a domain and use Google Sites or Blogger, as well as third-party services like Shopify, Squarespace, WIX, Bluehost, and Weebly.

In terms of reliability, it leverages the “same infrastructure used by Google,” including a “high performance DNS” and 24/7 support There’s also one-click DNSSEC to counter DNS spoofing and cache poison attacks. Contact information can also be kept private for free on WHOIS and RDAP. Other features include DNS record export if you want to move in the future.

Plans are available from $7/year, though .com starts at $12. Meanwhile, Google Domains is celebrating the “move out of beta” with a 20% discount (up to $5 off) on one domain registration or transfer-in using the code DOMAINS20. It’s available for new and returning users until April 15. 

Source: 9to5Google

Software Engineer Rashiq Zahid Creates Website That Knows If Your Local McDonald’s Ice Cream Machine Is Broken

There’s a tired joke about McDonald’s chronically broken ice cream machines. You’ve heard it, I’ve heard it, and 24-year-old software engineer Rashiq Zahid has heard it.

Fortunately, one of us—the engineer, of course—found a way to protect McDonald’s fans from the age-old disappointment of heading all the way to a store only to be told the ice cream machine isn’t working. Zahid calls his new masterpiece mcbroken, and it actually appears to work.

In simple terms, because, let’s be real, most of us don’t know what the hell reverse engineering an internal API means, mcbroken acts as a bot that tests the availability of ice cream sundaes at every US location every 30 minutes. It does so by trying to add a sundae to the cart on McDonald’s mobile app.

If the app fails to add a sundae to the cart because ice cream is unavailable at that location, that spot is marked with a red dot on the map. If the app succeeds at adding a sundae to the cart, it means ice cream is available at that location, earning the spot a green dot on the map.

Source: Thrillist

Barbr – Mobile App

Last year I prototyped a mobile app that allowed users to get quality haircuts in their home by booking barbers in the area. The concept came from people in big cities who work tight schedules and can’t make it to a barbershop during business hours, or they just don’t feel like driving somewhere and paying for parking. Sure the idea could use some more refining but with all the recent closures and limited gatherings, I don’t think I was too far off with this one💈