‘You Are Always Dispensable’: Woman Says That After She Left Her Job, She Was Replaced In 3 Hours

A TikToker says that after she left a job for which she worked overtime frequently, she was replaced within three hours of leaving.

Norah Myers, a TikToker who posts about wellness, said in a video Wednesday that she left a job for which she “went in early every morning, left late, and worked weekends.”

“You are always dispensable,” Myers says in her video, which on Monday had over 4 million views. “No job is worth your mental and physical health ever.”

In her video’s comments, Myers shared that after leaving another corporate job, she was replaced by two people. Both were fired within a month.

“All that matters at the end of the day is your relationships with family and friends,” Myers commented on her video.

Commenters on Myers’ video heartily agreed with her sentiment.

“Always remember, we work for ourselves, not for a company, even if we are working with the nicest people,” @emegrimaldi commented.

“No job is ever worth our health, ever. It means everything to us, and nothing to them,” @mypearwontgrow wrote.

“This is so true and so disheartening,” @kianahkaydijohn commented. “But it’s good to learn.”

Others shared their experiences leaving jobs that they felt didn’t value them.

“When I left a toxic company that didn’t value my work, they had to hire two people to do my job,” @rigovgd commented. “They wouldn’t give me a raise but did that instead.”

“I left a job that I worked so hard at. They replaced me in 1 day,” @mr.buggles wrote. “The mental anguish I felt at that place was bad.”

Dollar Tree Is Raising Its Prices To $1.25, Officially Breaking The Buck For Good

Dollar Tree is officially breaking the buck.

The discount chain announced Tuesday in its third-quarter earnings results that it will now sell the majority of its $1 items for $1.25 after testing higher prices earlier in the year.

In a call with investors, CEO Michael Witynski said that the new price regime will allow the company to bring back items that were previously abandoned — because of its $1 price constraint — and enable it to return profit margins to their longstanding levels of 35% to 36% next year. 

Dollar Tree, which also owns Family Dollar, was the last of the major dollar store chains in the US to stand by its $1 commitment for more than 30 years even as investors piled on the pressure for it to raise prices. 

Witynski said that by raising prices to $1.25, the company has more flexibility to absorb rising supply chain and labor costs that are biting into profit margins. 

On top of this, the company said it is expanding its higher-priced Dollar Tree Plus line of goods, which includes items that mostly cost between $3 and $5, to more stores. It plans to roll out the line to 5,000 stores by 2024, it said. 

For the moment, Witynski is promising to stand by the $1.25 price to keep things simple for customers, he said on the call. 

While analysts say the price increase will allow the company to return to its historic 35% margin levels (gross margin was 27.5% of net sales in the most recent quarter), there’s a risk that its customers could be turned off by this. 

“That risk is reduced customer traction, smaller basket sizes, and some erosion of the value credentials Dollar Tree is renowned for,” Neil Saunders, managing director of Global Data Retail, said in a note to clients Tuesday. “The simple fact is that many of Dollar Tree’s customers are feeling the heat of inflation on their spending power, and they won’t simply absorb such a large price lift,” he added.

Source: Business Insider

Jemele Hill: Athletes Go Broke by Feeling Guilty for Winning “Lottery Ticket” in Life

In this clip, Jemele Hill speaks about athletes going broke after their sports career ends, and she starts out by explaining that a lot of Black athletes have never had a model for managing generational wealth. She went on to speak about athletes being “depreciating assets” from the time they start their sports career, and she added that most NFL careers last less than 5 years. Jemele then addressed the large entourages of some players, and she explained that some of them feel a sense of guilt for winning the “lottery ticket” in life, which you can hear more about above.