New Batman Comic Unveils Robin As Bisexual

In the newest installment of the DC comic “Batman: Urban Legends,” Robin comes out as bisexual.

The sixth issue of the comic ends with Tim Drake, who fights crime as Batman’s famous sidekick Robin, accepting a date with another character, Bernard Dowd. Up until this issue, Robin has always dated women.

“Tim Drake finally coming out is so inspiring, DC never wanted a queer Robin but after years and years of campaigning from writers and fans it finally happened,” one fan tweeted. “A big thank you to Meghan Fitzmartin, Belén Ortega and Alejandro Sánchez for making this moment so beautiful.”

The follow-up issue comes out in December.

Source: The Hill

For the first time since the Great Depression, a majority of young adults (ages 18-29) in the U.S. now live with their parents — Report

As COVID-19 swept the country this year, millions of young adults retreated to familiar territory: living at home with mom and dad.

A majority of young Americans ages 18 to 29 are now living with at least one of their parents, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of Current Population Survey data. About 52% of this age group, 26.6 million people in total, were living with their parents in July, compared to 47% at the same time last year. This number surpassed the previous record of 48%, which was set in 1940, during the Great Depression.

Since the proportion of 18 to 29 year olds living at home hit a low of 29% in 1960, the number has risen over the decades, jumping to 36% in 1990, to 38% in 2000 and 44% in 2010. However, the increase this year is notably sharp, and tracks with the trajectory of the pandemic; while about 46% or 47% of young adults lived at home through 2019, in 2020 the number jumped to 49% in March, 51% in April and 52% from May through July.

Source: Time

“I Had To Change My Name”: Real-Life Karens On Becoming A Meme

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Urban Dictionary defines “Karen” as “the stereotypical name associated with rude, obnoxious, and insufferable middle-aged white women. In other words, a “Karen” is the type of woman who demands to speak to your manager or complains when you stand in the grocery store express line. Chances are, you’ve personally been victimized by a “Karen” — you just knew them by Amy, Sarah, or Emily. “Karen” — one of the top 10 most common names for baby girls born in the 1950s and 60s — has evolved into much more than a moniker. Now, American Karens are forced to reckon with their name becoming a symbol of white privilege.

While not all Karens are coming up with nicknames, many agree that “Karenphobia” has gotten out of hand. “The basis of the meme is fair, but what started out as a meme which rightfully called out white women on their privilege has evolved into a politically correct way for people to insult women,” Karen M. says.

So, could the world possibly be on the brink of a Karen rebellion? “I think that there will be a larger push back against the meme, and it will be led by women, but not that it will necessarily be women named Karen,” Karen M. says. There’s only one problem: raising a complaint with “systemic Karen-ism” might play into the very meme they’re fighting against.

Source: Bustle