Winnie-The-Pooh Officially Stars In Horror Movie After Disney Lets Copyright Expire—The Perfect Example Of The Wrong That Could Come From A Creative Work Slipping Into Public Domain

Last week, Disney+ released the sardonic Chip ’n Dale: Rescue Rangers, a live-action film that unabashedly pokes fun at Disney’s own offerings. A contrast to the picture-perfect personas projected in the classics, beloved characters here appear to be hiding beneath sweet façades while working in the underworld.

This upcoming Winnie-the-Pooh movie, however, isn’t by the unusually self-deprecating Disney. It’s the creation of Rhys Frake-Waterfield and UK movie production studio Jagged Edge, who will soon premiere a horror film featuring none other than Pooh Bear. They aren’t coy about identifying the muse, either, as the flick will be entitled Winnie the Pooh: Blood and Honey.

In case you haven’t heard, Disney lost exclusive rights to author A.A. Milne’s first iterations of Winnie-the-Pooh on the first day of this year, when a bevy of classic works entered the public domain. This permits anyone to reinterpret the 95-year-old edition however they deem.

As Disney can’t honey-coat Winnie-the-Pooh on its own now, this version of the bear is far more sinister. Teaser visuals newly shared by the producers seem to depict him as a human killer wearing an animal mask.

Not only that, but Piglet appears to return as Pooh’s sidekick—or, should we say, partner in crime.

The only other details disclosed so far are the names of the main cast, which include Amber Doig-Thorne, Maria Taylor, and Danielle Scott, as detailed on Winnie the Pooh: Blood and Honey’s IMDb page. The release date has yet to be announced.

We know for a fact that Tigger won’t be in this movie since he only appeared in Milne’s books from 1928, so he’s still under the shackles of Disney. Christopher Robin and Eeyore are free to go, though, so might they escape into a world of darkness too?

If Disney isn’t careful, Mickey Mouse could be the next to go under the chainsaw. The Steamboat Willie version of its star character is slated to enter the public domain in 2024.

Source: DesignTAXI

Wingstop Has Filed A Trademark To Serve Chicken Wings In The Metaverse — Application Covers “Downloadable Virtual Goods” Including NFTs And Virtual Food And Drink

You’ll never go hungry in the metaverse. After McDonald’s applied for trademarks to open a virtual restaurant, another fast-food chain is winging its chances in the digital sphere, in which it has expressed an interest in setting up camp.

As reported by Insider and outlined by trade attorney Mike Kondoudis, on February 25, Wingstop submitted a trademark application for “downloadable virtual goods,” including non-fungible tokens, digital art, “virtual food and drink,” and loyalty and reward cards. The filing was made with the US Patent and Trademark Office.

From the application, it also seems like Wingstop is looking at opening an NFT platform for chicken wing-loving cryptocurrency holders to buy, sell, and trade related virtual assets.

Publicly, Wingstop remains tight-lipped about its metaverse plans, but tells Insider it hopes to “serve the world flavor in a virtual space.”

Source: DesignTAXI

Playboy Suing Fashion Nova Over Halloween Bunny Costume

Playboy’s pissed at Fashion Nova for rolling out new bunny costumes, just in time for Halloween, which it claims are plainly “an attempt to piggyback off the popularity and renown of Playboy’s iconic bunny costume.”

Translation: Quit bitin’ our bunny!

In docs, obtained by TMZ, Playboy says Fashion Nova completely ripped off its iconic costume — which includes cuffs, collar, bowtie, corset, ribbon name tag, bunny ears and tail — and is selling them as Halloween costumes on its website. According to the suit, Fashion Nova’s even using the description “Bunny of the Month,” which Playboy says is a clear reference to its Playmate of the Month trademark.

Source: TMZ