Dick Gregory: Race, Comedy, And Justice

Its hard to predict whether Dick Gregory will be most celebrated as a path-breaking comedian or a trailblazing civil rights activist. Its impossible to imagine the history of either movement without him—or without his unique blending of the two. In the early 1960s, he became one of the first black comedians to perform before integrated audiences. In 1967, he ran for mayor of Chicago against Richard J. Daley, and a year later for president as the Freedom and Peace Party candidate. The author of and contributor to many politically charged books, Gregory is still a staunch, wry political voice across a range of issues as varied as nutrition, social justice, and the environment. Chicago Sun-Times columnist Laura Washington interviews the provocative and always unpredictable Gregory.

The first battery-free Game Boy wants to power a gaming revolution

The battery-free Game Boy. A video game console powered by a combination of energy from the sun and button-mashing during gameplay. 

It’s an orange brick about the size of a paperback novel but weighs only half as much as the original Nintendo Game Boy released in 1989. De Winkel, a computer scientist at Delft University of Technology, has been working on building the device for about a year. He calls it his “baby.”

Officially it’s dubbed the “Engage” (no relation to Nokia’s failed console, I’m told) but the inspiration is obvious. Beside the absence of a battery slot on the back, the device looks exactly like Nintendo’s revolutionary handheld. “It was critical from the start of the project that we maintain the feel of a Game Boy,” de Winkel says.

Source: CNET