Google Domains Is Finally Out Of Beta After Seven Years And Is Offering A 20% Registration Discount

Google’s domain registration service entered public beta in January of 2015. It’s now exiting beta into general availability in 26 countries, and Google Domains is marking the occasion with a discount.  

Google Domains, which has a nifty icon consisting of a dot and slash, says it has millions of active registrations and aims to be the “easiest place to find, buy and manage a domain.” Long beta periods are a hallmark of Google services, with Gmail’s lasting five years.

It offers over 300 domain endings and touts integration with other Google services, especially for business owners. For example, you don’t have to verify TXT records when integrating a website with Search Console, Google App Engine, or Cloud Run. There’s also the ability to add Workspace to a domain and use Google Sites or Blogger, as well as third-party services like Shopify, Squarespace, WIX, Bluehost, and Weebly.

In terms of reliability, it leverages the “same infrastructure used by Google,” including a “high performance DNS” and 24/7 support There’s also one-click DNSSEC to counter DNS spoofing and cache poison attacks. Contact information can also be kept private for free on WHOIS and RDAP. Other features include DNS record export if you want to move in the future.

Plans are available from $7/year, though .com starts at $12. Meanwhile, Google Domains is celebrating the “move out of beta” with a 20% discount (up to $5 off) on one domain registration or transfer-in using the code DOMAINS20. It’s available for new and returning users until April 15. 

Source: 9to5Google

Software Engineer Rashiq Zahid Creates Website That Knows If Your Local McDonald’s Ice Cream Machine Is Broken

There’s a tired joke about McDonald’s chronically broken ice cream machines. You’ve heard it, I’ve heard it, and 24-year-old software engineer Rashiq Zahid has heard it.

Fortunately, one of us—the engineer, of course—found a way to protect McDonald’s fans from the age-old disappointment of heading all the way to a store only to be told the ice cream machine isn’t working. Zahid calls his new masterpiece mcbroken, and it actually appears to work.

In simple terms, because, let’s be real, most of us don’t know what the hell reverse engineering an internal API means, mcbroken acts as a bot that tests the availability of ice cream sundaes at every US location every 30 minutes. It does so by trying to add a sundae to the cart on McDonald’s mobile app.

If the app fails to add a sundae to the cart because ice cream is unavailable at that location, that spot is marked with a red dot on the map. If the app succeeds at adding a sundae to the cart, it means ice cream is available at that location, earning the spot a green dot on the map.

Source: Thrillist

Yelp Will Label Businesses Accused Of Racist Behavior

In what the company calls a “firm stance against racism,” the review site Yelp will warn consumers when a business has been reported for racist behavior.

The company said it would only add this alert to a business page “when there’s resounding evidence of egregious, racist actions from a business owner or employee.”

This will include behavior such as “using overtly racist slurs or symbols.”

“As the nation reckons with issues of systemic racism, we’ve seen in the last few months that there is a clear need to warn consumers about businesses associated with egregious, racially-charged actions to help people make more informed spending decisions,” the San Francisco-based company said in a Thursday statement.

On social media, the announcement prompted some praise, but also skepticism from users who questioned how the initiative would be enforced.

The company said the alert will require a news article from a “credible media outlet.” A link to the article will accompany the notice, and it will appear over the reviews until dismissed.

Source: NPR