Apple announces Fitness Plus (virtual workouts) for Apple Watch Series 6, delivering breakthrough wellness and fitness capabilities; will research with UC Irvine (UCI) in health studies

Apple is launching a new subscription service for virtual fitness classes called Fitness Plus, the company announced during its presentation today. The service integrates with iPhones, iPads, and the Apple TV, but Apple says it’s built for the Apple Watch. Access to the service will cost $9.99 a month or $79.99 a year, and you’ll get three months free with the purchase of a new Apple Watch. It also comes bundled as part of Apple’s new Apple One subscription. Apple says Fitness Plus will be available before the end of the year.

Many of the workouts require just a set of dumbbells or no equipment at all, Apple says, which should give you the flexibility to do them wherever’s convenient for you. There are 10 different workout types available, including cycling, treadmill, yoga, core, strength, rowing, and HIIT routines, and there’s a program built in for absolute beginners. You can select workouts based on their duration, and Apple says it plans to add new workouts every week.

Apple is joining forces with researchers to conduct three health studies that include using Apple Watch to explore how blood oxygen levels can be used in future health applications. This year, Apple will collaborate with the University of California, Irvine, and Anthem to examine how longitudinal measurements of blood oxygen and other physiological signals can help manage and control asthma.

Source: The Verge

Fujifilm breaks mirrorless speed record with new f/1.0 lens

Fujifilm has announced a new 50mm X-series lens with an unprecedented f/1.0 aperture. The XF 50mmF1.0 R WR is the world’s first f/1 autofocus lens for mirrorless cameras, according to Fujifilm, and marks the 35th X-series lens the company has produced. Its field of view is about 75mm-equivalent on Fujifilm’s APS-C sensors.

Fujifilm’s previous fastest lens was the 56mm f/1.2, which is the aperture that companies like Canon and Nikon also tend to top out at when designing autofocus lenses. While Canon did make an autofocus 50mm f/1.0 for its DSLRs at one point, it was discontinued decades ago. Nikon and Leica have made f/0.95 lenses before, but they only worked with manual focus. Large apertures allow the user to achieve shallower depth of field and shoot at faster shutter speeds or lower ISO settings.

Source: The Verge

Photography Tips: Full Frame & Crop Sensor Cameras

What is the difference between Full Frame & Crop Sensor? Full Frame or Crop Sensor – which is better? What is the best sensor size? These questions are asked a lot and it can be very confusing.

Both sensor sizes have benefits and potential ‘costs’ attached to them. A full frame has less depth of filed than a crop – so for blurry background portraits a FF will be better, but for big depth of field maybe a crop sensor camera. But that will have less resolution… and so it goes on.

So I’ve distilled it down to the basics to explain the advantages and dis-advantages of both to help you chose which works best for you.

Mike Browne

Canon’s EOS R5 Is the Brand’s Most Powerful Full-Frame Mirrorless

Screen Shot 2020-05-28 at 3.20.29 PM

Dubbed the EOS R5, the upcoming camera uses a newly-designed image sensor and processor to enable no-crop capture of both 8K and 4K video recordings. The former can be shot in a RAW format while the latter can reach up to 120 frames-per-second, and amazing feat for a camera of this size. All its 8K and 4K modes will support Dual Pixel CMOS AF, and a new advanced animal AF mode has been integrated, which is capable of tracking animal eyes, but also their faces and bodies if the eyes aren’t visible. It boasts five-axis in-body image stabilization which works in tandem with optical image stabilization offered by both RF and EF lenses. Of course, it also carries dual card slots to allow for both a CF card and SD card. Most impressively, Canon has announced a price tag of “under $4,000” USD, an exceptional price for a video recording workhorse with specs which can reportedly outperform the $39,000-USD full-frame Sony Venice.

Source: HypeBeast