How Chinese-Canadian Division One Basketball Player Ben Li (Lehigh University) Silences Racist Trash-Talkers On The Court

Chinese-Canadian NCAA division one basketball prospect Ben Li has received all the Asian-related racist jibes under the sun.

“I’ve heard all the names right when I step onto the court. From the players it’d be all comparisons to any Asian thing – soy sauce, Jackie Chan, Yao Ming, small eyes. Like I’d be shooting free throws and another team would be standing right there saying ‘can you even see the rim?’ and all that,” the 19-year-old Lehigh University, Pennsylvania first-year said.

Born in Toronto to native Chinese parents, Li defied the odds, stereotypes and stigma to make history as the first ethnic-Chinese player to make the All-Canadian game last year. It is but only the beginning of the forward’s mission to reach the NBA and the Chinese national team.

Already touted as the “Chinese Zion Williamson” by adoring media, Li hoped his unconventionally large physical presence on the court would help rid the arena of any prejudices. Otherwise he will have to take into his own hands.

“It’s definitely annoying but over time, their words didn’t matter to me. Most of the time they were trash-talking and all that, they were usually down. So any time they’d say anything, most of the time I don’t say anything back and just point at the scoreboard,” said Li, all 1.98m, 105kg of him.

“It’s actually pretty fun to get to prove people wrong or when they expect me to not really do anything. Then I showcase my game. Sometimes they start talking trash and I’d get my stuff going and dominate the game. That’s pretty fun sometimes.”

Li regularly seeks advice – be it basketball or identity related, or both – from hero-turned-friend Jeremy Lin, the Taiwanese-American who famously graced the NBA with the “Linsanity” era of 2012. That he is now exchanging texts with the man he watched on TV is another “pinch me” moment in his fledgling career so far.

“I definitely want to shout out Jeremy Lin,” said Li, who he featured alongside on a Chinese basketball TV show in 2019.

“This year, he gave me his number and offered me an outlet to ask questions if I’m struggling or need any advice. I look up to him like a bigger bro. That’s kind of surreal to me because he was my role model.”

“When I first met him, I told him I was just trying to get scholarships and play division one basketball so my parents wouldn’t need to pay a cent for me at university. I think that’s where it kicked off because he could relate to me and had to go through a lot of things. He’s even been kind enough to offer to get a workout in together. That’s surreal. That person you watched, that got you into the sport I’m in now. Now I can just to talk to him. It’s just crazy.”

No racial slur is justifiable, but the ignorance may be partly to do with the lack of Asian faces in the game. That applies throughout all age groups, from little leagues to the NBA, where you could count the number of Asian players on your fingers.

Li’s athletic talent had grown to the point that he would need to head south from his native Canada. The path to a division one scholarship offer was meticulously planned and it was only a matter of time before calls came flooding in.

“I had to do what was best for me and expose myself to more schools and coaches. When I got to Virginia, my coach started calling schools in to come watch. Over time, my stock grew and my coach even told me that people were calling asking ‘is the big Asian guy still available? Can I come watch him work out?’” he said.

“I do this for the younger generation looking for knowledge from anyone in my situation. They’ll read this as the next Asian guy who wants to play division one basketball. My goal on top of playing in the NBA and the national team is to inspire the next generation of Asians to break out of their comfort zones.”

“I feel like there’s a stigma that we’re less than other people in a sport just because of the colour of our skin – and I think that’s kind of bulls***. If you just put in the work and screw what other people think, you can go wherever you want to go in your sport. I don’t want other people thinking they can’t get past something if they’re Asian.”

Source: South China Morning Post

One Of A Kind | The Rob Van Dam Story (Full Career Documentary)

In the late 90’s and early 2000’s there were few wrestlers on the planet more popular than Rob Van Dam. His innovative in ring style combined with his unique laid back character touched a nerve with many fans, leading to him becoming a main event player in pretty much every promotion he ever worked with. Even today, 30 years into his storied career, RVD continues to be a big name in the industry; after having his most recent run with Impact. So, how has he managed to maintain such longevity, and what has kept him going this whole time. Well, join us today as we take a deep dive into his entire career journey in, One Of A Kind: The Rob Van Dam Story.

After 9 years of being on-air, The Breakfast Club has been officially inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame

REVOLT’s “The Breakfast Club” will be inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame months shy of their 10-year anniversary.

The syndicated morning radio show will join the group alongside fellow 2020 inductees Angie Martinez and Sway Calloway.

According to The Radio Hall Fame’s website, the organization, a project of the Museum of Broadcast Communications, “honors those who have contributed to the development of the radio medium throughout its history in the United States.”

Following their induction, the hosts of “the world’s most dangerous morning show” took to social media to react to the news.

“We Made It!!!! 2020 Radio Hall of Fame Inductees!!!” DJ Envy wrote alongside his Instagram post. “Thank You to all of you for riding with us.. @breakfastclubam.”

Angela Yee thanked “The Breakfast Club” fans while sending praise to her fellow inductees. “What an accomplishment! We are in the Radio Hall of Fame class of 2020! Congrats to @angiemartinez @realsway @donniesimpsonsr for being legendary personalities in this 2020 class,” she wrote. “And for everyone who listens to us in the morning and is part of our family, thank you so much for this honor!”

In Charlamagne tha God’s Instagram post, he owed his accomplishments to God. “One day people will look back and give us respect for how we impacted the culture the past decade,” his Instagram caption read. “All Praises and Glory Due To God and sincere Thanks and Gratitude to everyone who listens to us on the radio, via podcast, YouTube, however you consume your breakfast, THANK YOU for being a part of our club.”

The Breakfast Club” is no stranger to recognition. They previously earned the top spot on The Source Power 30 Radio and DJ’s list and was nominated for an NAACP Image Award back in January. Video clips from many of their interviews have gone viral on numerous occasions over the years.

Source: Revolt

Charlamagne Tha God

“Drinking on a normal weeknight? Out of the question. I’m not straight edged, I got a full bar at the crib. But I’m never tempted by it because I’m buzzed off the work I’m putting in” – Charlamagne Tha God 2017

Amazon’s Expired Food Problem

Amazon is shipping out food products from third-party sellers that are expired, stale, or tampered with. Four months after CNBC first reported the problem, a new analysis found the sellers are still shipping expired food, even as regulation begins to catch up.

Amazon told CNBC that this happens in very isolated incidents, and that it will suspend or terminate a seller’s account for violations of its strict policies. Still, the CNBC analysis found expired hot sauce, beef jerky, granola bars, Doritos, coffee creamer and baby food being sold by third-party sellers, which can impact consumer trust of the brands and Amazon itself.