Black Lives Matter NY Loses All Credibility After Restaurant Releases Footage

The owner of a popular Manhattan restaurant stands by his employee on Friday and blasted the three African-American women from Texas charged with attacking the restaurant’s hostess for demanding to see proof they were vaccinated against COVID-19.

The incident happened last Thursday when three African-American women from Texas decided to dine at Carmine’s, a popular Italian restaurant in Manhattan. All three women showed proof of vaccination—which is a New York City requirement now—and were allowed to enter the restaurant.

However, three male friends of the African-American women showed up a little later and were refused entry because they did not show proof of vaccination. The party as a whole was offered seats outside instead.

The women claim the 24-year-old Asian-American hostess who refused entry to the male party was being “rude” and said the “N-word” before lunging at them first.

A viral video shows the group of African-American women physically assaulting the Asian-American hostess while she’s screaming, “Oh my god, what the f**k!?”

49-year-old Sally Recehelle Lewis of Houston, 44-year-old Kaeita Nkeenge Rankin, and 21-year-old Tyonnie Keshay Rankin, both of Humble, Texas, were charged with assault and criminal mischief. The three women were released without bail soon after.

In response, Black Lives Matter New York uploaded an Instagram post stating they will protest Carmine’s on Monday, September 20, and falsely stated the hostess who started it all was “White.”

On Monday, over 30 members of Black Lives Matter gathered in front of Carmine’s and chanted “Cancel Carmine’s,” while demanding African-American customers to leave the restaurant.

“After she dropped the N-bomb, the three women did a double-take and followed her out the restaurant,” stated Hawk Newsome, co-founder of Black Lives Matter New York.

Newsome and his cohorts demanded Carmine’s release security footage of the incident and claimed the restaurant was covering up the truth.

Carmine’s almost immediately released the footage to the local media, which clearly shows the three African-American women follow the Asian-American hostess outside and attack her without provocation.

Many witnesses state the women were bitter the other half of their party were not allowed to enter the restaurant and basically got angry they didn’t get what they wanted. No racial slur was ever heard leading up to the vicious attack or during it.

During Monday’s protest, members of Blacks Lives Matter can be heard screaming “We’ll teach you Whites and Asian people a lesson.”

Source: Asian Dawn

NYC Robbery Crew Used Apple Watch To Track And Rob Drug Dealers For Over $500K

Feds capture NYC robbery crew, who robbed drug dealers for upwards of $500,000 using a hidden Apple Watch.

New York has seen its fair share of smart criminals and masterminds who’ve gone undetected for years until they slipped up and caused their own downfall. From white collar crime to straight up armed robbery, anything can go down in NYC, but every criminal has a plan and plots like a scene out of a heist movie.

Hollywood has made billions taking these stories and turning them into big screen blockbusters, and according to The New York Post, there is a new story that could be a contender for the big screen. The scenario involves 7 men robbing drug dealers instead of regular citizens, making for an interesting situation.

A New York robbery crew that targeted drug runners hit the jackpot late last year, netting $500,000 in cash after tracking a targeted criminal’s car — with a hidden Apple Watch, new court documents show.

The seven-person crew based in the Hudson Valley pulled off the major score in January 2020 after their alleged leader, 30-year-old Darren Lindsay, bought an Apple Watch and linked it to his AT&T account, according to federal prosecutors in papers filed Tuesday.

The thieves put the watch underneath the bumper of a car that belonged to a drug-runner they suspected was flush with cash, the documents say.

The group was taken into custody in July for a string of robberies over the past three years. Authorities say the group made away with over $500,000 in their efforts and even posted with the cash on social media.

This may seem harmless due to the fact they were robbing drug and cash runners, but it’s far from a Robinhood story. Keep in mind, if you’re robbing big time dealers, the feds are already probably investigating them and now you’re on their radar which never ends well. While the plan was smart, as always, the clout and posting on social media was their ultimate downfall. Just imagine how far they could have gotten if they kept it to themselves.

Source: Bossip

Male Model Tyson Beckford: Kids Teased Me, Called Me “Mr. Chin” For My Chinese Eyes

Tyson Beckford came through for his first-ever VladTV interview, and he and Vlad started off reminiscing about their time living in New Jersey, where they were neighbors. From there, Tyson spoke about growing up in Jamaica until he was 7, and then his family moved back to the Bronx. He explained that he was teased for his Jamaican accent when he first moved back, and Tyson added that kids would call him “Mr. Chin” because of his eyes. To hear more, including how the teasing made him tougher, hit the above clip.

Eddie Huang Opens Up On Racism Towards Asian Community, Pop Smoke, And Leaving ‘Fresh Off The Boat’

Producer, director & personality Eddie Huang sat down with Ebro in the Morning for an honest conversation about racism against the Asian community following the shooting at massage parlors in Atlanta. He also discussed some of the experiences he has had himself, and its effects in the community.

He also spoke about the passing of Pop Smoke, solidarity among different races in Los Angeles, his decision to leave the show ‘Fresh off the Boat,’ and more.

He directs the film, ‘Boogie’ which is in theaters now.

Eddie Huang’s Five-Step Guide To Making Your First Movie – His Directorial Debut ‘Boogie’ Is The Street-Level Story Of An Aspiring Chinese-American Basketball Star Being Pulled Between Two Worlds

Make friends: The hardest part of making a movie is paying for it. Every person in your life becomes a potential investor or contributor. I enlisted all my friends. My assistant became my lead, my mom played a fortune teller, [the rapper] Despot was hanging out on set and became a character, half my rec-league basketball team is in the film. I made two of the songs for the soundtrack in Taiwan with dudes I met in the club, others donated locations, and friends of friends became heads of departments. Make friends, then make movies—together.

Practice working with actors:There’s a lot to keep track of as a director, but you can be terrible at everything as long as you do one thing well, and that’s working with actors. Every other department has a dedicated leader who is already incredible at what they do. You can get caught up trying to impress your DP with your knowledge of lenses or your production designer with your collection of fine china, but the only thing you actually have to handle is actors. That is the one thing you can’t fuck up.

The Ja Rule:As Ja once said, “Always there when you call, always on time.” I’ve heard horror stories about production delays, things running over budget, and directors being replaced. Growing up in restaurants, it was never okay to be late, short on the register, or wasteful with food. I brought that restaurant mentality to Boogie and told everyone that the schedule is the schedule and the days are the days. This is what is budgeted and this is what has to get done today. We’re all artists, but we’re also a business. The only way I get to make another film is if this one makes money. We finished principal photography on time and under budget—despite losing an actor to a threesome, where he got cracked over the head with a champagne bottle, amongst other unconscionable circumstances—because we said we would.

Go crazyOn the day you’re shooting a scene, it doesn’t matter how many movies you’ve watched or how many times you’ve storyboarded it, you have to be in it. You have to be with your actors, and on the journey, as a participant. One of my favorite scenes was written on set. One day, we finished early,  so I threw Taylor [Takahashi, who plays the title character] and Jorge [Lendeborg Jr.] back on set, and gave them a deck of Monopoly Deal cards. I told Taylor, “You want to play cards instead of working on this school project because you don’t think school matters.” I told Jorge, “Boogie has basketball, you don’t. The only way you get to college is if you get him to work on this project with you.” It was my favorite scene to shoot because it reaffirmed the magic that can happen when a group of people put aside their fears and get after it.

Go away: After you shoot it, forget it. I spent way too much time editing and only figured the movie out once I stopped watching it. I’ve never had kids, but I do remember telling my parents over and over since the age of 12 to leave me alone, and I imagine that’s how my movie felt.

Source: Interview Magazine

Racism Decimated Chinatown In New York, San Francisco And Seattle – Anti-Asian Sentiment Grew Over Fears Of COVID-19 Pandemic, After First Reported Outbreak In China

In New York, Seattle and San Francisco, where businesses and restaurants have suffered for months as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, Chinatown is marking a year since it first started feeling the effects of the global outbreak.

In the early days on the pandemic, as fear grew that the virus first reported in China would spread to the United States, growing anti-Chinese sentiment caused people to avoid the district, causing harm to the communities’ economies even before the first American case of COVID-19 was confirmed.

The impact worsened as President Trump continuously branded COVID-19 the ‘China plague’.

Asian American small businesses have been among the hardest hit by the economic downturn during the pandemic. 

While there was a 22 percent decline in all small business-owner activity nationwide from February to April, Asian American business-owner activity dropped by 26 percent, according to a study by the National Bureau of Economic Research. 

A year on, as the Chinese New Year on February 12 approaches, the normal 16-day celebrations are being abandoned for online events and the oldest Chinatown districts in San Francisco, New York and Seattle remain ghost towns.

Despite the younger generations coming to the communities’ aid, the promise of a faster vaccine rollout, and the aid of donations and loans, Chinatown businesses are still daunted by the uphill battling facing them in surviving 2021.

Source: Daily Mail