Molly Yeh’s Midwestern ‘Popcorn Salad’ Recipe Gets Roasted On Twitter

Food Network’s Molly Yeh shared the recipe for “Crunchy Snap Pea Popcorn Salad” that has divided opinion on social media. Although an overwhelming majority seemed to find nothing delectable about the popcorn salad, a few defended the food blogger and the recipe. 

The recipe video, which has gone viral on the microblogging platform with over 1.4 million views, shows Molly whipping up some popcorn salad with peas, carrots, shallots, watercress and celery leaves. The ingredients are tossed through a salad dressing made of mayonnaise, sour cream, cider vinegar, sugar and Dijon mustard.

The video has racked up 1.4 million views on Twitter, where some wondered if the video was a spoof or parody.

“Food Network is just trolling us at this point right?” asked one Twitter user. “Some kind of abomination,” another remarked.

Others pointed out that the salad dressing would turn the popcorn soggy. “I’m so confused. Doesn’t the dressing make the popcorn soggy? How do you even eat this?” a user asked. “‘Soggy popcorn, delicious!’ – Said no one ever!” another quipped. 

Source: NDTV

Reddit Acquires TikTok/Triller Rival Dubsmash

Reddit has acquired Dubsmash, the lipsyncing video app which launched in 2014 and was largely supplanted when TikTok showed up. 

Announced via Reddit’s blog on Sunday, the annexing of Dubsmash’s 12-person team to Reddit’s 700-strong horde is the popular website’s first major acquisition in its 15-year history.

While the financial terms of the agreement haven’t been disclosed, Dubsmash will be keeping its own platform and separate branding. Dubsmash’s Android and Apple apps will continue to operate as normal, with its video creation tools simply integrated into Reddit’s infrastructure. 

Reddit currently allows users to upload and livestream videos, however its editing capabilities are somewhat lacklustre — a problem this acquisition hopes to address.

“The transition to video will be bigger than the transition to mobile,” Reddit co-founder and CEO Steve Huffman said, speaking via the Wall Street JournalWhich sounds fake, but okay. Pivots to video historically haven’t worked out well, but perhaps the distinction between editorial and user-created content will yield better results.

Dubsmash went through a slow decline in the wake of its 2015 popularity boom, before revamping itself in 2017 to stage an unlikely comeback. While still not as successful as TikTok, the short-form video app established a significant audience by focusing on the one demographic still using it — Black teenagers in the U.S

As such, both Reddit and Dubsmash’s acquisition announcements heavily emphasised the diverse, underrepresented creators who use the app. According to Reddit, a quarter of Black teens in the U.S. use Dubsmash, while 70 percent of users are women or girls.

“By joining forces with Reddit, we expand our ability to serve the creators that represent the lifeblood of Dubsmash, helping them connect, share, and deepen their impact on culture,” wrote Dubsmash co-founders Suchit Dash, Jonas Drüppel and Tim Specht. The trio further reaffirmed their goal to “[create] a safe and welcoming platform for underrepresented communities.”

“Both Reddit and Dubsmash share a deep rooted respect for how communities come together,” said Huffman. “Dubsmash elevates under-represented creators, while Reddit fosters a sense of community and belonging across thousands of different topics and passions.”

Source: Mashable

Food Personality Eddie Huang Announces Closure of Baohaus NYC – Taiwanese Pork Belly Buns that Catapulted ‘Fresh Off The Boat’ Autobiography & TV Show on Asian American Experience

Eddie Huang has just announced the official closing of the bao shop that started it all. Opened in 2009, Huang and his close friends/partners set out to tell their story through food, via delicious pork belly buns (gua bao) to be exact, and Baohaus in New York City‘s Lower East Side was born. Two years later, Baohaus moved to a larger location in East Village where they remained up until now.

The popularity of his New York establishment has aided in catapulting Huang into the fields in which he has always believed saw the least bit of Asian-American presence — Television, film, and literature — to which he has now all successfully offered his voice to. Huang points out that it was not an easy decision with, “We held out as long as we could, but we have decided to close. Shouts to the customers that ran in thinking we were open, it means a lot. It’s been a wild and fulfilling 10-year ride with Baohaus but I’d be lying if I said ‘I can’t believe what’s happened.’”

In the Instagram post, Huang shouted out his team, plugged his upcoming film Boogie, quoted Raekwon, and paid his respects to Prodigy and Anthony Bourdain. And with that, Baohaus turned on their glowing-blue neon sign for the last time. It’s on to the next adventure for the Human Panda.

Source: Hypebeast

Trader Joe’s to discontinue ethnic-sounding names (“Trader Ming’s,” “Trader José,” “Trader Giotto’s) on international food products considered ‘racist branding and packaging’

The label perpetuate harmful stereotypes, according to the social media campaign. “The Trader Joe’s branding is racist because it exoticizes other cultures — it presents ‘Joe’ as the default ‘normal’ and the other characters falling outside of it — they are ‘Arabian Joe,’ ‘Trader José’ and ‘Trader Joe San,’ the petition states.

The petition added, “The common thread between all of these transgressions is the perpetuation of exoticism, the goal of which is not to appreciate other cultures, but to further other and distance them from the perceived ‘normal’.”

“While this approach to product naming may have been rooted in a lighthearted attempt at inclusiveness, we recognize that it may now have the opposite effect — one that is contrary to the welcoming, rewarding customer experience we strive to create every day,” company spokeswoman Kenya Friend-Daniel said.

Source: CBS News

2016 – Celebrity Chef Eddie Huang on the Oppressive Whiteness of the Food World; Tears into Food Network Eater and Praises Ghetto Gastro on Instagram

But what makes it all worse is that one of the things Eater has done is help push a kind of restaurant consensus around that monoculture, which goes a little like this: notable chef, must speak English, must be media-savvy, must have design-driven dining room, must kowtow to the scene, must have small plates, must push diverse histories through French ricers, must have toast points, must love dogs. Eater’s not alone in doing this — plenty of others do, too (including Grub Street). But the result is a formula that has basically condo-ized New York’s food culture with some ultimately pretty conservative, even intolerant, values. Which means maybe it shouldn’t be a surprise that there’s a penitent skinhead near the top of Eater’s food chain. But it is a reason to try and shake things up. Food is so essential to our lives and social ecosystem that this news should be a signal not just to question the people in these positions of power but to question the positions themselves.

Source: Grub Street

Why Big Tech Wants You To Ditch Your Password

The average office worker in the United States must keep track of between 20 to 40 different username and password combinations. With so many passwords to remember, many of us use the same ones over and over, or have a running list of passwords saved somewhere. Passwords are a very serious and expensive security risk. It’s why companies like Microsoft , Apple and Google are trying to reduce our dependence on them. But the question is, can these companies break our bad habits?

Update (January 21, 2020): A website mentioned in this video, WeLeakInfo, was shut down by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other law enforcement agencies on Friday, Jan. 17, 2020. The site claimed to have more than 12 billion usernames and passwords from more than 10,000 data breaches.

Passwords are a very serious and expensive security risk. A report by Verizon looked at 2,013 confirmed data breaches and found that 29% of those breaches involved the use of stolen credentials.

Another study by the Ponemon Institute and IBM Security found that the average cost of a single data breach in the U.S. was more than $8 million. Even when passwords are not stolen, companies can lose a lot of money trying to reset them.

“Our research has shown that the average fully loaded cost of a help desk call to reset a password is anywhere between $40 or $50 per call,” says Merritt Maxim, vice president and research director at Forrester.

“Generally speaking, a typical employee contacts a help desk somewhere between 6 and 10 times a year on password related issues,” Maxim said. “So if you just do the simple multiplication of six to 10 times, times 50 dollars per call, times number of employees, in your organization, you’re talking significantly hundreds of thousands of dollars or even potentially millions of dollars a year.”