Russian Painting Worth €1 Million Ruined After Bored Security Guard Draws Eyes On Faceless Figures

A painting insured for €1 million has been vandalised by a “bored” security guard who drew eyes on the canvas on his first day of work.

Employees at Russia’s Yeltsin Center have sent Anna Leporskaya’s ‘Three Figures’, painted between 1932-1934, off for restoration after the art was vandalised with a museum-branded ballpoint pen.

Authorities confirmed on 8 February that the work had been defaced by a new security employee aged 60.

The unnamed employee since been dismissed from his position, reports The Art Newspaper Russia, who broke the story.

“His motives are still unknown but the administration believes it was some kind of a lapse in sanity,” the exhibition’s curator Anna Reshetkina said.

Leporskaya’s artwork depicting three faceless figures was on loan from the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow so it could feature at the Yeltsin Center’s abstract exhibition, titled ‘The World as Non-Objectivity. The Birth of a New Art’.

Two visitors spotted the addition of eyes on two of the figures during a visit on 7 December 2021.

Criminal proceedings against the employee were initially dismissed due to the assessment that the painting could be saved.

Mounting public pressure has lead to this being reconsidered under the charge of vandalism, which carries a sentence of a €468 fine and a one-year correctional labour in Russia.

The piece was sent to a restoration team at the State Tretyakov the day after the incident and is now being treated.

Restoration is expected to cost around €3,000 but experts are confident the painting can be saved without any serious damage to the original brush strokes.

Ink from the ballpoint pen is said to have only slightly penetrated the paint layer.

The Yeltsin Center confirmed they have installed protective screens over the rest of the exhibition to prevent copycats.

Source: Euronews Culture

Brooklyn Nets’ Owner Joe Tsai Pledges $50 Million to Create ‘Economic Mobility’ in Brooklyn’s Black Community

Tsai r G

The Brooklyn Nets, led by owners Joe and Clara Wu Tsai, are pledging $50 million over 10 years to establish and support they hope will lead to economic mobility in the Black community.

The couple will lead a “five-point plan,” which will include continued support for its players pushing for social and economic equality and address wage gaps in communities of color, starting in Brooklyn. The plan will also address diversity within the Nets organization and the National Basketball Association league office.

“After George Floyd’s death, we felt like we needed to take a firm stand on racial injustice,” Clara Wu Tsai said in an interview with CNBC on Monday. “I wanted to state our beliefs on this issue — that racism is pervasive and needs to be addressed, and I wanted to lay out core principles that clarified our purpose as an organization.”

Source: CNBC

How #MeToo concerns led Disney to cut a popular character from the live action ‘Mulan’ remake

43581b90-5f0e-11ea-bfdf-1f1190920718.jpg

All eyes are already on Walt Disney’s live-action remake of its 1998 animated favorite Mulan due to its reported $200 million price tag and global release plan at a time when coronavirus concerns have led some high-profile blockbusters to switch release dates. Now there’s another piece of news that has fans concerned: the new adaptation will omit a popular character from the original film, Li Shang, voiced by B.D. Wong. In the 1998 version, Shang captained the army that the titular female warrior (Ming-Na Wen) joins under the guise of being a male recruit named Ping. Like Shang’s signature song goes, he somehow makes men out of his soldiers-in-training and, in the process, finds himself drawn to Ping in particular. By the end of the movie, romance has blossomed between the captain and his best fighter, whose real identity is exposed before the climactic battle.

It’s that kind of questionable power dynamic between a superior and a subordinate that the creative team — including director Niki Caro — behind the 2020 version wanted to avoid in their telling of the ancient Chinese legend that serves as Mulan’s source material. Speaking with the website Collider and other journalists as part of a set visit, producer Jason Reed said that Shang’s burgeoning romance with Mulan (played by Liu Yifei) didn’t make sense in the #MeToo era. “I think particularly in the time of the #MeToo movement, having a commanding officer that is also the sexual love interest was very uncomfortable and we didn’t think it was appropriate,” Reed remarked. “In a lot of ways that it was sort of justifying behavior of we’re doing everything we can to get out of our industry.”

Source: Yahoo