Man Released On $10K Bond After Shooting A Young Boy As He Retrieved His Bike From The Man’s Yard

Michigan man Ryan Le-Nguyen has been released on bond after he shot and injured a six-year-old Black boy who attempted to retrieve his bike from a yard.

FOX 2 Detroit reports that Le-Nguyen threatened the young boy, Coby, with a sledgehammer before firing a shot at the child from the front window of his house. The boy’s father, Arnold Daniel, said his children were playing outside on their bikes in Ypsilanti Township, Michigan, when they left their bikes in front of one of their neighbors’ home. When Coby attempted to retrieve the bike, he said that Le-Nguyen came out with a sledgehammer in his hands.

“He tried hitting me with a sledgehammer but that’s not going to work because I’m too fast,” Coby said. “[He] got a gun and BOOM shot me right here.” Thankfully, the boy only sustained injuries during the shooting, and the bullet went through his arm. He’s currently back at home and is recovering from his injuries, from which he is expected to be okay. Le-Nguyen was arrested and charged with assault with intent to murder, but he was released on a $10,000 bond just three days later.

While Coby appears to be in high spirits following the incident, his father is still confused as to why he was released on a bond “so low for trying to kill my kid.”

“Right now, he’s not even processing what happened. He doesn’t realize how close he came to not being here… But I realize it,” he added. Le-Nguyen has been told he is not to return home, but Daniel said he’s still concerned “because I don’t know what he’s capable of.”

Source: Complex

UCLA Advances To First Men’s Final Four Since 2008 Thanks To Johnny Juzang, Who Could Be First Asian American NBA Lottery Pick

Johnny Juzang’s impact at UCLA has been immediate since he transferred from Kentucky, giving the Bruins the scorer and dynamic player they had been missing in recent years.

The junior guard is playing his best at just the right time, leading the Bruins into the Final Four for the first time since 2008.

Juzang also has had a much broader impact, even if it’s been unintentional.

Projected to be the first Asian American NBA first-round pick, possibly in the lottery, he’s become an inspiration for younger players at a time when hate crimes against Asian Americans are on the rise.

“It’s not something that’s on the top of my mind or really think about. I’m just Johnny,” said Juzang, who’s mother is Vietnamese. “I will get messages or hear stories about how I inspire people, regardless of their heritage. Sometimes there are people of Asian decent. But just being able to inspire people is something that’s touching and inspires me and something I don’t take lightly.”

Juzang’s older brother Christian played at Harvard and led the Saigon Heat to the 2020 championship in the Vietnamese Basketball Association.

Christian was the top pick in the VBA draft, and the younger Juzang looks like he has an even brighter professional future. He has thrived on the court since transferring to Westwood. A former five-star recruit, the 6-foot-6 guard was a role player on a loaded Kentucky team, averaging 2.9 points and 1.9 assists in 28 games as a freshman.

Not long after the coronavirus pandemic shut down the season, Juzang announced he was transferring and later picked UCLA to be closer to his family in Tarzana, California.

Juzang missed the first four games of the 2020-21 season with a foot injury, but he is a big reason the Bruins were able to overcome senior Chris Smith’s season-ending knee injury in early January.

Juzang was the Bruins’ leading scorer at 15.5 points per game while shooting 34% from the 3-point arc and seemed to get better as the season progressed. He scored at least 20 points three times in the NCAA Tournament, including 28 against Michigan to clinch a spot in the Final Four.

And he’s done it on an ankle that’s been bothering him for weeks.

“He’s more of a scorer than a shooter and I think that’s what he got labeled at Kentucky,” UCLA coach Mick Cronin said. “I wanted him to get rid of that mindset. We really worked hard on his mid-range and him going to the basket. He’s grown immensely.”

Juzang’s length and skill set have him projected as a possible lottery pick in next year’s NBA draft. It will be history if he is.

Jeremy Lin was a standout at Harvard before his Linsanity days in the NBA and lengthy professional career. Kihei Clark, who’s Filipino American, made one of the biggest plays during Virginia’s run to the 2019 championship and just completed his junior season.

Arizona State’s Remy Martin had a stellar four-year career in the desert and Jordan Clarkson, who is also Filipino American, has a steady NBA career going after playing at Tulsa and Missouri.

Rui Hachimura of Gonzaga was a lottery pick, but he is a native of Japan. Yao Ming never played college basketball, going straight from the Chinese national team to the NBA.

Juzang is a rarity as an Asian American in college basketball with clear NBA potential.

“I think it’ll be a really significant moment and I think the more that it can just be felt where that is normal, I think is what can make it even more significant,” Miami Heat coach Eric Spoelstra, who’s mother is Filipino, said without talking specifically about Juzang. “It doesn’t matter what your race is or what your background is. As long as you can hoop, then people can see you in that way.”

A high draft pick or not, Juzang has been an inspiration for players, particularly young Asian Americans. Hate crimes against Asian Americans have spiked during the pandemic, as has the vitriol on social media and beyond toward people of Asian decent.

Juzang’s success and UCLA’s run into the Final Four has drawn positive reactions from Vietnam and all over the world.

“That’s always a good feeling to hear from people, but I wouldn’t say it’s on the forefront of my mind,” he said.

Maybe not, but it’s helping — at least a little.

Source: NBA

How Some Collegiate Athletes Are Making It Clear They’re #NotNCAAProperty​

Rece Davis talks with Michigan Wolverines’ Isaiah Livers, Jordan Bohannon of the Iowa Hawkeyes and Geo Baker of the Rutgers Scarlet Knights about their college experiences and what they are hoping to accomplish from the #NotNCAAProperty​ movement.

0:00​ Livers, Bohannon and Baker describe what their college experiences have been like throughout their four years at their respective schools.
4:56​​ They describe the reaction on social media, especially with Livers wearing the shirt that says “Not NCAA Property.”
12:24​ Bohannon explains what they hope to accomplish in their upcoming meeting with NCAA president Mark Emmert.
17:00​ Livers says the Michigan coaches, including Juwan Howard, have been very supportive of what he is trying to achieve.
21:07​ Baker and Livers explain what the impact would be if college athletes are able to make money off their likeness.

Memories Can Be Injected and Survive Amputation and Metamorphosis

The study of memory has always been one of the stranger outposts of science. In the 1950s, an unknown psychology professor at the University of Michigan named James McConnell made headlines—and eventually became something of a celebrity—with a series of experiments on freshwater flatworms called planaria. These worms fascinated McConnell not only because they had, as he wrote, a “true synaptic type of nervous system” but also because they had “enormous powers of regeneration…under the best conditions one may cut [the worm] into as many as 50 pieces” with each section regenerating “into an intact, fully-functioning organism.” 

In an early experiment, McConnell trained the worms à la Pavlov by pairing an electric shock with flashing lights. Eventually, the worms recoiled to the light alone. Then something interesting happened when he cut the worms in half. The head of one half of the worm grew a tail and, understandably, retained the memory of its training. Surprisingly, however, the tail, which grew a head and a brain, also retained the memory of its training. If a headless worm can regrow a memory, then where is the memory stored, McConnell wondered. And, if a memory can regenerate, could he transfer it? 

Shockingly, McConnell reported that cannibalizing trained worms induced learning in untrained planaria. In other experiments, he trained planaria to run through mazes and even developed a technique for extracting RNA from trained worms in order to inject it into untrained worms in an effort to transmit memories from one animal to another. Eventually, after his retirement in 1988, McConnell faded from view, and his work was relegated to the sidebars of textbooks as a curious but cautionary tale. Many scientists simply assumed that invertebrates like planaria couldn’t be trained, making the dismissal of McConnell’s work easy. McConnell also published some of his studies in his own journal, The Worm Runner’s Digest, alongside sci-fi humor and cartoons. As a result, there wasn’t a lot of interest in attempting to replicate his findings.

David Glanzman, a neurobiologist at the University of California, Los Angeles, has another promising research program that recently struck a chord reminiscent of McConnell’s memory experiments—although, instead of planaria, Glanzman’s lab works mostly with aplysia, the darling mollusk of neuroscience on account of its relatively simple nervous system. (Also known as “sea hares,” aplysia are giant, inky sea slugs that swim with undulating, ruffled wings.)

Source: Nautilus

Insane Clown Posse cancels their annual Gathering of the Juggalos, originally slated to take place in August, due to Covid-19: ‘We Refuse to Risk Even One Juggalo Life’

The Insane Clown Posse announced on Wednesday that they’re canceling this year’s Gathering of the Juggalos due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The festival celebrating the hardcore hip hop duo will be postponed to next year.

“The bottom line is that we REFUSE to risk even ONE Juggalo life by hosting a Gathering during these troubling times,” the Insane Clown Posse said in a statement posted to Twitter.

The group, comprised of Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dope, then referenced their most recent album titled “Fearless Fred Fury” to advise their fans “to heed the words of Fred Fury and Flip the Rat: ‘BE SAFE: Watch your step and take it easy. You can’t replace what you mean to our team.”

Source: CNN