Human Remains Found In Lake Elsinore Identified As Tustin Woman Missing Since 1977

Investigators believe they have positively identified the human remains found down an embankment in Lake Elsinore in 1986 as those of a woman who had been reported missing to Tustin police in 1977, Riverside County District Attorney’s office officials said.

The remains were found along Ortega Highway by a Caltrans crew doing survey work, and were reported to the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department. At the time, sheriff’s investigators determined the person had been shot in the head, but could not identify the person or any suspects at the time, a news release said.

In August 2021, the Cold Case Homicide Team exhumed several remains in cold case homicides and the remains found in 1986 were among those sent to a Department of Justice lab for possible DNA comparison.

Linda LeBeau, who was also known as Linda Louise Durnall, was divorced and reported missing to the Tustin Police Department by her boyfriend in 1977. At the time of her disappearance, she was 27 years old and police investigators were not able to resolve the case, a news release said.

The remains were positively matched to LeBeau through a familial DNA match in the Department of Justice’s Missing Unidentified Persons database.

Tustin police have followed multiple leads in the case, which has remained an open investigation.

The Regional Cold Case Homicide Team is comprised of members of the DA’s Office Bureau of Investigation, the Riverside County Sheriff-Coroner Department, the FBI and the Riverside Police Department.

Source: OC Register

Saranac Lake High School Valedictorian Francine “Frannie” Newman Speaks Out On Racism From Students AND Teachers in Speech

aggaga.jpg

  • “Adults in my life have played just as large a role in reinforcing my self-loathing as kids have,” she added. “In third grade, I was given to the wrong parent at the end of a field trip, because the parent was Asian, with the excuse, ‘You all just look the same.’ In eighth grade a classmate was asked by the teacher, ‘In this room, who is going to get into college first?’ and was forced to choose Jackson and myself, seeing as we were the ethnic minorities.
  • Newman added that she felt held back by her ethnicity in future accomplishments.
  • “We were told that we were lucky to not be white, even though in that moment I would have given anything to blend in with the rest of the class, and would have given anything to think that my future accomplishments would be based on merit and not on race.”

Source: NextShark

2009 – Minneapolis Police Officer Jason Anderson Cleared in Wrongful Death Trial of Fong Lee

Minneapolis police officer Jason Anderson has been cleared in the wrongful death trial of Fong Lee. The jury at the U.S. District Court in St. Paul found Anderson did not use exessive force, and therefore no damages will be awarded to Fong Lee’s family.

Officer Andersen shot and killed Lee, 19, on July 22, 2006. Some video of the incident was captured on surveillance cameras Cityview Elementary School in north Minneapolis.

The 12-member jury deliberated for roughly six hours between Wednesday and Thursday, after hearing five days of testimony.

During his closing argument Wednesday, Assistant City Attorney Jim Moore played an image at the start of the chase, asking jurors to look in the very lower right corner of the screen as Lee begins to run from police.

He said, “It looks like a gun to him.” Moore also told jurors they may not see the gun in other images because Lee may have had it cupped in his hand.

Lee’s family had argued their son was unarmed, and alleged police planted the gun.

Before deliberating, U.S. District Judge Paul Magnuson instructed the jury to first decide, unanimously, whether Andersen used excessive force. If they decided he did not, they would return with their decision. If they decided he did, they had to decide if he was malicious in his use of force, and if so, how much to award the Lee family in damages.

Statement from Police Chief Tim Dolan

Officer Andersen acted with courage and integrity in fulfilling his duty to serve and protect the people of Minneapolis. Unfortunately, in return, the department and Officer Andersen have had to endure highly inflammatory accusations that have unfairly caused hardship for him and his family. We are pleased that Officer Andersen has been vindicated, and now hope that we can all move forward and heal as a community.

California State Leaders formally apologize to Japanese-Americans for internment camps during World War II

California lawmakers on Thursday voted unanimously to formally apologize for the role the state legislature played in the incarceration of more than 120,000 people of Japanese descent in internment camps during the second world war.

The mandatory relocation, which came on the heels of the Japanese military attack on Pearl Harbor, forced hundreds of thousands – 70% of whom were American citizens – to leave behind their homes, belongings and communities.

This week’s vote comes 78 years after President Franklin D Roosevelt signed an executive order that gave the US army authority to remove Japanese civilians in the US from their homes following the Japanese military attack on Pearl Harbor.

Albert Muratsuchi, the California state assembly member who introduced the resolutionsaid he wanted to lead by example and commemorate the anniversary in a bipartisan measure at a time when “our nation’s capital is hopelessly divided along party lines and President Trump is putting immigrant families and children in cages”.

Source: The Guardian