Photographer Nate Gowdy Captured Images Of The Chaos Outside The Capital – ‘Still Processing What I Witnessed’

Photographer Nate Gowdy has documented close to 30 official Trump rallies since 2016, so he thought he knew what to expect when he arrived in Washington, D.C. after leaving Atlanta this week.

“My flight from Atlanta to Baltimore the night before should’ve prepared me for what would be one of the most surreal scenes I’ve documented,” he explains. “I’d never been aboard a plane where the dichotomy of people’s views was so starkly apparent, with people donning red hats and Trump merch side by side with people just getting from one place to the other.”

A chant of “Four More Years” began and was booed by others on the plane, which then resulted in someone shouting: “Go back to Venezuela!”

After the events of January 6th, when a mob of Trump supporters breached the Capitol and swarmed for hours until they were ejected from the government building, Gowdy states: “I’m still processing what I witnessed yesterday. We all are. It’s difficult to know what people are thinking when they’re breaching security barriers, attacking law enforcement, threatening members of the media, flaunting pandemic safety protocols, and bashing down the doors and windows to Congress, feeling enabled by the words they’ve just heard uttered from their ringleader, the President of the United States, who tells them that they are fighting the good fight. Throughout the afternoon, I heard countless individuals quipping how it was the best day of their life, and that it was one for the history books. How do you capture something so unprecedented, particularly when you don’t believe the ‘truths’ they do?”

Source: Rolling Stone

The Biden campaign started selling fly swatters right after the debate. They’ve already sold out

The Biden campaign didn’t miss a beat trying to capitalize on the, um, buzz of the vice presidential debate.

Within minutes of the debate wrapping up Wednesday, the Biden campaign tweeted a photo of Joe Biden with a fly swatter and a caption that said, “Pitch in $5 to help this campaign fly.”

In case you missed it: A fly very noticeably landed on Vice President Mike Pence’s stiffly coiffed head as he debated Sen. Kamala Harris. The fly lingered, and the internet couldn’t stop talking about it.

Two hours later, the Biden campaign website was peddling $10 “Truth Over Flies” swatters.

And within a few hours more, a campaign spokesperson said, the nearly 35,000 swatters had sold out.

Biden campaign selling ‘Will You Shut Up, Man’ T-shirts following first presidential debate

Joe Biden‘s campaign started selling T-shirts bearing the phrase “Will You Shut Up Man” after the Democratic nominee directed the retort at President Trump during the pair’s first presidential debate Tuesday night.

The Biden campaign store began selling the T-shirts with the phrase superimposed over an image of an unhappy-looking Trump even as Tuesday’s debate was ongoing. The former vice president’s campaign is selling the shirts for $30-$33.

Trump frequently interrupted his Democratic opponent during the debate Tuesday, a tactic the former vice president occasionally reciprocated. The hour-and-a-half debate included a number of heated moments, with candidates repeatedly talking over each other or seeking to cut into the other’s speaking time.

Source: The Hill

The History of Ballot Design is the History of Democracy – As millions of Americans begin to head to the polls, here’s how our printed ballots have evolved

1) Early Ballots

Early ballots were printed using letterpress with the voter writing in the candidates name by hand. These pre-printed tickets from the 1850s made it easy confirm the sale of intoxicating liquors in Boston.

2) Ballots as Propaganda

Ballots were often used to illustrate a particular party platform, like this vivid anti-Chinese ticket for the Workingmen’s party in San Francisco. Several parties touted the protection of White labor, culminating in the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the first federal law barring a specific ethnicity from immigrating to America.

3) Impressive Displays of Typographic Grandstanding

The mid- and late-nineteenth century was a period of heavy experimentation in the printing world. Wood type, metal type, and lithography were often combined, creating layouts that are impressive displays of typographic grandstanding.

4) DIY Ballots

Ballot modifications were not discouraged by political parties and were so habitual that small strips of gummed paper called “pasters” would be sent to voters or handed out at the polls. Glue pots were provided at polling stations so voters could literally stick alternative candidates’ names on top of the printed ones. Ballots layouts became more elaborate as a reflection of the period style, but also served as an attempt to foil pasting efforts with serpentine typesetting.

5) The Australian Ballot

The adoption of the new Australian ballot format in the late 1880s was a radical shift in format, but these examples are more aligned with ballots we recognize today. Mandated by the government, all candidates were listed by office and the ballot was cast in private. Despite the regulations, modifications still persisted, like this New York ballot from 1914 that used tiny emblems to denote party affiliation. Voters were now able to freely select candidates across different parties, but detractors claimed the layout was too arduous as the volume of candidates and offices necessitated sometimes huge and unwieldy trim sizes. 

Ballot reformers like civic activist Richard Childs proposed ‘short ballots’ to simplify the decision making process and make it easier for the average voter. “The people must take an interest in all their electoral work if they are to be masters. If they do not take an interest in a given ballot, there are two solutions—change the people or change the ballot,” he wrote in his 1911 book, Short Ballot Principles. “As the people are too big to be spanked, and since human nature in the mass responds but slowly to prayer, it is good sense to change the ballot.”

Source: AIGA

Pro-immigration group Immigrants’ List Civic Action launches ad targeting Trump’s ‘attacks against Asian Americans’

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A progressive pro-immigration group is launching an ad targeting Asian American voters in battleground states by highlighting President Trump’s controversial rhetoric about the coronavirus.

The group, Immigrants’ List Civic Action, will air the ad featuring what the group calls Trump’s “attacks against Asian Americans” digitally and on connected television in the key states of Florida, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan.

The 60-second ad intersperses clips of Trump calling the virus the “Chinese flu,” “Chinese virus” and “kung flu,” along with reports of rises in anti-Asian discrimination, according to a copy of the ad shared with The Hill.

Asked about the group’s assessment of Trump’s “attacks against Asian Americans,” the Trump campaign defended the president’s comments regarding the coronavirus.

“President Trump is not afraid to call out China, and he also strongly stated that we must protect Asian Americans because they bear no responsibility whatsoever for the Chinese virus,” campaign spokesman Matt Wolking said in a statement. “The fault lies with China alone, and when Chinese officials tried to blame American troops for the virus, President Trump fought back against their disinformation campaign by making it very clear where the virus originated.”

The campaign highlighted comments from one of the president’s White House briefings in April where he stated that “it’s very important that we totally protect our Asian American community in the United States and all around the world. They’re amazing people, and the spreading of the virus is not their fault in any way, shape, or form.”

Source: The Hill

NBA fires Houston Rockets’ photographer Bill Baptist who posted offensive meme about Kamala Harris; removed from bubble

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A photographer working in the NBA bubble at Disney World was let go by the league after he posted an offensive meme about Kamala Harris, the newly announced Democratic candidate for vice president.

Bill Baptist is a freelance photographer from Houston who has covered the Houston Rockets for a number of years and was in the bubble as an independent contractor. The meme he posted on Facebook saw a wider audience when it was shared by former Houston Comets superstar Sheryl Swoopes.

The NBA said in a statement to KPRC 2 in Houston that Baptist was no longer in the bubble.

Source: Yahoo Sports

Reddit changes logo in support of #BlackLivesMatter and co-founder Alexis Ohanian resigns; asked to be replaced with black candidate

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Current CEO Steve Huffman posted a letter to Reddit employees on June 1 outlining support for the Black Lives Matter movement, but it did not include specific actions the company was taking. The logo will remain black for eight days, in symbolism of the number of minutes Minneapolis police office Derek Chauvin held his knee on George Floyd’s neck.

Today, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian announced his resignation from his role on the board of directors and asked to be replaced with a black candidate. He has also donated one million dollars to Colin Kaepernick’s Know Your Rights campaign, and said he will funnel all future gains on his Reddit stock to benefit the black community.

Source: SF Gate

Washington Examiner fires Fiona Moriarty-McLaughlin for taking a picture with a power drill in front of a boarded-up store in LA as part of ‘self-promotional’ stunt amid George Floyd protests

Fiona Moriarty-McLaughlin was let go after video footage emerged of the the staged image taken Monday, drawing a backlash from people who blasted her over the self-promotional stunt.

The journalist has not addressed the video publicly and did not immediately return requests for comment from multiple media outlets.

Monday’s video marks the second time this week that Moriarty-McLaughlin has garnered negative attention on Twitter.

On Sunday she posted a since-deleted video of a Los Angeles protester spray painting an Ouai billboard with the words ‘Black Lives Matter’.

‘BREAKING: As if vandalizing all the buildings in LA wasn’t enough @Blklivesmatter has taken to the billboards as a crowd of rioters roars in approval. #GeorgeFloyd #LARiots,’ she wrote in the caption.

Ouai founder and celebrity hairstylist Jen Atkin replied to the video with a message of support for the protesters.

‘Made our sign every better,’ Atkin wrote.

Source: Daily Mail