Create Patterns And Vectors From Any Image 

Today we explore Aaron’s new favorite tool in Photoshop, Create from Image! Learn how to use any photo to create custom graphics and color themes, and then save those graphics and themes to your Libraries to use again at any time. The perfect tool for making logos, advertisements, and website designs!

This is a just a quick look at this powerful and versatile tool. If you want to learn more, be sure to experiment with it by creating your own patterns, shapes, and color palettes in Photoshop!

Microsoft Is Selling Ugly Windows MS Paint-Themed Holiday Christmas Sweaters, With Proceeds Benefiting Girls Who Code

Microsoft has unveiled a clothing line of Windows “ugly” sweaters ahead of the Christmas holiday season. 

The fashion line features three designs inspired by the nostalgic MS Paint, Windows 95, and Windows XP, with each piece of outerwear being priced at US$69.99. 

“No matter your skill at painting (or MS Paint), you’re sure to be a work of art in this ‘Untitled – Paint’ masterpiece,” Microsoft wrote. 

A portion of the proceeds will head towards Girls Who Code, a nonprofit focused on closing the gender gap in the tech industry. 

Source: DesignTAXI

The History of Ballot Design is the History of Democracy – As millions of Americans begin to head to the polls, here’s how our printed ballots have evolved

1) Early Ballots

Early ballots were printed using letterpress with the voter writing in the candidates name by hand. These pre-printed tickets from the 1850s made it easy confirm the sale of intoxicating liquors in Boston.

2) Ballots as Propaganda

Ballots were often used to illustrate a particular party platform, like this vivid anti-Chinese ticket for the Workingmen’s party in San Francisco. Several parties touted the protection of White labor, culminating in the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the first federal law barring a specific ethnicity from immigrating to America.

3) Impressive Displays of Typographic Grandstanding

The mid- and late-nineteenth century was a period of heavy experimentation in the printing world. Wood type, metal type, and lithography were often combined, creating layouts that are impressive displays of typographic grandstanding.

4) DIY Ballots

Ballot modifications were not discouraged by political parties and were so habitual that small strips of gummed paper called “pasters” would be sent to voters or handed out at the polls. Glue pots were provided at polling stations so voters could literally stick alternative candidates’ names on top of the printed ones. Ballots layouts became more elaborate as a reflection of the period style, but also served as an attempt to foil pasting efforts with serpentine typesetting.

5) The Australian Ballot

The adoption of the new Australian ballot format in the late 1880s was a radical shift in format, but these examples are more aligned with ballots we recognize today. Mandated by the government, all candidates were listed by office and the ballot was cast in private. Despite the regulations, modifications still persisted, like this New York ballot from 1914 that used tiny emblems to denote party affiliation. Voters were now able to freely select candidates across different parties, but detractors claimed the layout was too arduous as the volume of candidates and offices necessitated sometimes huge and unwieldy trim sizes. 

Ballot reformers like civic activist Richard Childs proposed ‘short ballots’ to simplify the decision making process and make it easier for the average voter. “The people must take an interest in all their electoral work if they are to be masters. If they do not take an interest in a given ballot, there are two solutions—change the people or change the ballot,” he wrote in his 1911 book, Short Ballot Principles. “As the people are too big to be spanked, and since human nature in the mass responds but slowly to prayer, it is good sense to change the ballot.”

Source: AIGA

A More Diverse Workplace Is Good for Society, and for Business — Creative Director Justin LaBaw-Rivers’ Experience as an African American Graphic Designer

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Nonette Llabres spoke with Justin about his solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, his experience as an African American designer, the need for more diversity in agency leadership roles, and taking inspired action to balance working for yourself and making a difference in the world.

It’s very common to not have enough diversity, especially in the traditional creative agency world. One figure I’ve seen is that only 10% of workers on agency teams are people of color.

All of them want the same thing as I do — we want to create really dope products that can change the world and work with fun people at the same time.

Lululemon apologizes after art director advertises ‘Bat Fried Rice’ shirt; fires employee

Lululemon is apologizing after its art director shared a “bat fried rice” t-shirt design on social media that has been slammed online as “racist” and “anti-Asian” amid the coronavirus pandemic.

On Sunday, Trevor Fleming, the senior global art director of Lululemon, shared a link on Instagram to the t-shirt design first shared by California artist Jess Sluder. (Fleming’s Instagram account has since been deleted.)

The design featured a Chinese take-out box decorated with bat wings and the words “no thank you” on the back. The shirt, titled “Bat Fried Rice,” was listed for purchase at $60 before it was taken down.

Source: USA Today

Clever Episode 113: Graphic Designer Stefan Sagmeister

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In this episode, Clever host Amy Devers talks to graphic designer Stefan Sagmeister. Stefan did not care for engineering in high school. Instead, he found designing a poster that would communicate a vibe and draw crowds to an event to be way more compelling. After design school, the Austrian native decided that New York is the city that fits him best. With many awards and a big name in his field, he’s now focusing on art, exhibitions, and taking a sabbatical every 7 years. He’s got a brain for planning and long-term data which allows for a very optimistic long view.

Source: Design Milk