Heinz Debuts Spoon Made Of Fries To Catch The Ideal Amount Of Ketchup

For years, fast-food enthusiasts have had a chip off their shoulders. Sometimes there’s too much ketchup on their French fry, rendering it a flabby mess. At other times, it’s barely there. And don’t get them started on the concept of double-dipping.

Heinz UK claims to have the perfect solution to end this fries-stration for good: ‘Spoon Friez’. As their name suggests, they’re fries in the shape of spoons.

According to the condiment maker, the mouths of spoons are just the right size to carry the perfect amount of ketchup for the ultimate eating experience. “Carbs in the shape of a spoon? Fry-nally,” the brand tweets.

LADBible reports that the company began dipping into (or scooped into?) the idea of making edible cutlery after a self-conducted survey that revealed 95% of consumers would rather not eat their fries if there was no sauce. The research also found that 84% were annoyed at how they couldn’t nail the perfect potato-to-ketchup ratio.

Unfortunately, you won’t be able to find Spoon Friez at your favorite fast-food joint. Heinz only gave them away as part of a sweepstakes for National Fries Day, which falls on July 13 each year. The fact that that’s a Wednesday this year, and not a Friday (Fry-day, get it?), is kind of infuriating.

Source: DesignTAXI

Russia’s Rebranded McDonald’s Restaurants (Vkusno i tochka) Scribble Out Golden Arches On Sauce Packets

Russia’s McDonald’s restaurants reopened Sunday with a new name, logo, and menu, but the same sauce packets.

Staff at the rebranded fast-food chain scribbled out the McDonald’s logo on sauce packets with black pen, Reuters reported, with an image from the Agence France-Presse seemingly confirming this.

Vkusno & tochka, which Reuters translated as “tasty and that’s it,” opened 15 stores in and around Moscow on Sunday, including what was formerly McDonald’s flagship Russian restaurant in the city’s Pushkin Square.

Alexander Govor, a Russian businessperson, bought Russia’s McDonald’s restaurants after the burger giant said that continued ownership was “no longer tenable, nor is it consistent with McDonald’s values” following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

The hurried rebranding shows how Govor has tried to strike a balance between operating restaurants that will satisfy customers as a substitute for McDonald’s and not violating the company’s trademarks.

“We don’t have the right to use some colors, we don’t have the right to use the golden arches, we don’t have the right to use any mention of McDonald’s,” Govor told Reuters.

The huge lines of people waiting to get burgers in the days before Russian McDonald’s restaurants closed and the hefty price tags for its products on classified-ads sites showed the scale of its bulging Russian market. By clinging on to aspects of McDonald’s menu, branding, and store design, whenever possible, Vkusno & tochka can try win over loyal customers.

The famous golden arches have been scrapped, and Vkusno & tochka has a new logo made up of just one dot and two lines — or a burger and two fries — which appear in the shape of a large “M.”

Oleg Paroev, who was named as the CEO of McDonald’s Russia in February, and who has continued his role as CEO of Vkusno & tochka, said the restaurant interiors would remain the same but all traces of the McDonald’s name would be removed, Reuters reported.

Reuters reported that the chain largely used plain white packaging for fries and burgers, plain white drink cups, and plain brown paper takeaway bags. This is also evident in some of the photos of products on Vkusno & tochka’s website.

Though some dishes look familiar, Vkusno & tochka has no plans to sell Big Macs and McFlurrys.

“These names, these brands, their appearance and production technology” are too directly related to McDonald’s, Paroev said, according to The Journal.

Source: Business Insider

How Doja Cat Brought Back Taco Bell’s Mexican Pizza — The Complete Timeline

Fast food restaurant brand Taco Bell is bringing back the Mexican Pizza, as announced by Doja Cat at Coachella, but what did the singer do to establish its return and how did she become the chain’s spokesperson?

Doja Cat’s debut Coachella stage was everything we wanted – and more. She brought out Tyga and Rico Nasty, and performed new song Vegas that will feature in Baz Luhrmann’s forthcoming movie Elvis. 

What we didn’t expect was breaking news regarding the return of the Mexican Pizza at Taco Bell. The singer is known to be a loyal fan of the fast-food fave and has been campaigning for the item’s return since it was taken off the menu in 2020.

Let’s take a look at her perseverance for the sake of Mexican Pizza over the past year.

Doja Cat, a Taco Bell partner, announced the mouthwatering news at the weekend and the chain followed with a press release on Monday, stating the singer “literally dropped the mic with the hot news of the Mexican Pizza’s return this May”.

It wasn’t just Doja at the forefront of the Mexican Pizza movement, more than 200,000 fans signed a Change.org petition spearheaded by Krish Jagirdar, who called the item a “bridge to American culture for kids who grew up in immigrant households”.

The Mexican Pizza, which features refried beans and ground beef sandwiched between crispy tortillas and topped with melted cheese and tomatoes, will be available from 19 May.

The 200,000 signatures surely made a difference but would it have had the same impact without a passionate celeb at the forefront?

Taco Bell removed the fan favourite in 2020 as chains streamlined menus following the pandemic, while the packaging reportedly “accounted for more than seven million pounds of paperboard annually in the US”.

The Say So singer’s history with the chain dates to May 2021, when she tweeted her determination to bring back the pizza.

Taco Bell congratulated Doja Cat on her album release in June 2021 but never got back to her about the product. By September, an irritated Doja complained to Taco Bell.

“I want my Mexican Pizza back @tacobell why u quiet”, she tweeted.

Two hours later, the company hinted it was actually considering the Mexican Pizza’s return but all remained quiet until Doja asked for more information after Taco Bell featured one of her songs in a commercial.

By February 2022, the rapper was truly part of the Taco Bell team as she starred in its Super Bowl 2022 ad, The Grande Escape, covering Hole track Celebrity Skin.

The 26-year-old proved she could create music about anything with her viral ditty about the food item, although she forbade anyone to call it a jingle. Joking she was forced to make a song due to “contractual reasons”, she claimed she had tried to make the track bad but it came out pretty catchy and went viral on TikTok.

There you have it, Doja got the Mexican Pizza thanks to her perseverance and ability to create a tune Taco Bell couldn’t resist.

Source: HITC

“You Can Steal Our Images, But You’ll Never Steal Our Taste” — KFC Launches ‘ChickenStock.Net’ Image Library For Others To Steal Their High-Resolution Photos, For Free

Success invites imitation, and there is little doubt that international QSR brand Kentucky Fried Chicken—or KFC if brevity is more your thing—has ruled the roost when it comes to tasty morsels of deep-fried poultry and sides. So many copycats have hatched over the years that KFC has decided to address the phenomenon again with a cheeky website called Chicken Stock.

Styled after popular stock photography websites, Chicken Stock offers free-to-use high-resolution images of KFC’s menu items. On Chicken Stock’s about page, the QSR brand explained that it had noticed many competitors using fuzzy, pixelated pictures of its signature chicken. Rather than let its food get poorly represented, they’re making available quality photography. KFC explains that “even though they [competitors] can borrow our pictures, they will never borrow our taste.”

It’s not the first time KFC has used copycats to remind folks of the real deal, made with a secret blend of 11 herbs and spices. In 2019, the brand ran its “Guys, we’re flattered” campaign that featured a clever poster composed of different imitators’ store signs arranged alphabetically, in addition to TV advertising.

While the Colonel takes no umbrage with all the Kentucky Fake Chickens, there is a limit, of course. In 2013, the brand threatened to take legal action against a Thailand restaurant with a trade dress styled after KFC’s that replaced Sanders with Adolf Hitler.

Source: The Dieline

Burger King’s New “Sorry For The Confusion” Posters Want To Trick Meat Eaters Into Trying Plant-Based Food

Burger King’s latest campaign with David Madrid is confusing meat lovers as it continues to reinforce its commitment to offering plant-based alternatives.

‘Meat?’ plays on the visual similarities between animal-based products and meat-free options with a striking, very close up series of print and out-of-home (OOH) ads with the tagline: “Sorry for the confusion, meat lovers”

On closer inspection of the ad imagery, meat lovers may be surprised to realize they are actually looking at red pepper, beetroot and radicchio.

“Many times, guests can’t tell the difference between the traditional Whopper and the plant-based Whopper,” said André Toledo, executive creative director at David Madrid.

“So we challenged a food photographer and a food stylist to shoot some vegetables in a way that would make them look like meat. The idea was to create ads that would make people ask themselves ‘Wait, is this meat or is this a plant?’”

“At Burger King, our plant-based products often feel, taste and look like real meat; yet many guests are skeptical,” added Iwo Zakowski, head of global brand marketing at Burger King.

“We wanted to bring a visually powerful message that makes you reconsider that not everything in life is what it seems to be. At Burger King, there is always something on the menu for everyone.”

Source: The Drum

Wendy’s Rips Into McDonald’s French Fries In Savage New Billboard

Fast-food rivalries have been longstanding, and perhaps no rivalry has been more fun to watch over social media than that between Wendy’s and McDonald’s.

From Wendy’s savagely slamming the Golden Arches on Twitter over the seemingly forever broken ice cream machines to the former calling its new hot honey chicken sandwich “anything but McBland,” it’s safe to say that the two know how to riff each other when it comes to who reigns supreme.

Wendy’s latest not-so-subtle campaign is taking it one step further, and it looks like social media has caught on rather quickly.

Over the past few months, Wendy’s has put billboards up around Chicago advertising its famous French fries after the recipe was reformulated in August 2021 to maintain a fresher and crispier consistency upon delivery.

“What we’ve done is balance the cut of the fry and kept a little bit of the skin of the potato on the fry to be able to drive flavor,” Wendy’s President Kurt Kane said at the time. “We used a batter system that allows us to be able to maintain crispiness, both when they’re fresh and hot out of the fryer as well as several minutes later.”

The billboards read “hot and crispy fries don’t arch, just sayin’” alongside a photo of a folded fry that has an uncanny resemblance to half of the “M” in the famous McDonald’s Golden Arches symbol.

Naturally, Twitter took note and had a field day with it.

“I have tears in my eyes from laughing so much,” one user commented below one of the billboard photos. “I love how savage @Wendys is.”

“Twitter’s not enough..so we’re taking it to the streets now, huh, Wendy’s,” another joked alongside a crying laughing emoji.

Wendy’s even tweeted back a sly face emoji at one of the original posters, playing along with the social media fodder.

The fast-food chain still maintains that their fries are preferred 2:1 to McDonald’s.

Your move, Mickey D’s.

Wendy’s was up 12.59% year over year as of Friday afternoon.

Source: Entrepreneur