‘You Are Always Dispensable’: Woman Says That After She Left Her Job, She Was Replaced In 3 Hours

A TikToker says that after she left a job for which she worked overtime frequently, she was replaced within three hours of leaving.

Norah Myers, a TikToker who posts about wellness, said in a video Wednesday that she left a job for which she “went in early every morning, left late, and worked weekends.”

“You are always dispensable,” Myers says in her video, which on Monday had over 4 million views. “No job is worth your mental and physical health ever.”

In her video’s comments, Myers shared that after leaving another corporate job, she was replaced by two people. Both were fired within a month.

“All that matters at the end of the day is your relationships with family and friends,” Myers commented on her video.

Commenters on Myers’ video heartily agreed with her sentiment.

“Always remember, we work for ourselves, not for a company, even if we are working with the nicest people,” @emegrimaldi commented.

“No job is ever worth our health, ever. It means everything to us, and nothing to them,” @mypearwontgrow wrote.

“This is so true and so disheartening,” @kianahkaydijohn commented. “But it’s good to learn.”

Others shared their experiences leaving jobs that they felt didn’t value them.

“When I left a toxic company that didn’t value my work, they had to hire two people to do my job,” @rigovgd commented. “They wouldn’t give me a raise but did that instead.”

“I left a job that I worked so hard at. They replaced me in 1 day,” @mr.buggles wrote. “The mental anguish I felt at that place was bad.”

The U Experience, a startup focused on providing university students a traditional college experience with bubble-style resort campus, moves to Boca Raton Florida (Waterstone Resort & Marina) for fall semester after local outrage from Hawaii bubble hotel plans

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Editor’s Note: On August 17, one day after this story was published, The U Experience announced it would host its program at the Waterstone Resort & Marina in Boca Raton, FL.

Last week, two Princeton alumni garnered national attention for plans to create two ‘bubble’ campuses in Hawaiʻi and Arkansas, just as the University announced that all fall instruction would be remote.

After widespread backlash from local Hawaiʻi residents, the alumni’s business idea, titled ‘The U Experience,’ will no longer come to fruition at either property.

Lane Russell ’18 and Adam Bragg ’16 started The U Experience in response to many colleges’ decisions to conduct fully virtual fall semesters. They planned to house about 150 college students, who would take classes online in a ‘bubble’ hotel, where they could “come to live out the college experience with total peace of mind,” according to the company’s website.

On the same day Russell appeared on CNN, a seven-member team of Hawaiʻi residents published a Change.org petition titled “Stop Bringing Nonresident Students to Hawaiʻi During a Pandemic,” which garnered over 11,000 signatures in just three days.

According to Lexi Figueroa, who helped write the petition, the authors also received an outpouring of support from non-residents, including University alumni, who expressed opposition to The U Experience, citing the “selfish, irresponsible, and disrespectful nature of this project.”

“We only have 340 ICU beds to service the entire population of Oʻahu,” the team behind the petition wrote to the ‘Prince.’ “A single outbreak in a The U Experience ‘bubble’ would deplete nearly half of our health resources.” In total, Oʻahu has a population of nearly one million.

On Aug. 11, the U Experience announced that it had suspended plans with Park Shore Waikīkī and Graduate Fayetteville — just four days after the Business Insider feature.

In their Aug. 11 update, The U Experience team maintained, “our goal is to disrupt education, not local communities.”

Source: Business Insider

A More Diverse Workplace Is Good for Society, and for Business — Creative Director Justin LaBaw-Rivers’ Experience as an African American Graphic Designer

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Nonette Llabres spoke with Justin about his solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, his experience as an African American designer, the need for more diversity in agency leadership roles, and taking inspired action to balance working for yourself and making a difference in the world.

It’s very common to not have enough diversity, especially in the traditional creative agency world. One figure I’ve seen is that only 10% of workers on agency teams are people of color.

All of them want the same thing as I do — we want to create really dope products that can change the world and work with fun people at the same time.

Alyssa Milano roasted after complaining that Joe Rogan’s podcast has more listeners than she does in 22-tweet celebrity temper tantrum

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Joe Rogan entertains millions of listeners with episodes of his podcast “The Joe Rogan Experience,” but not everyone is thrilled about the UFC commentator’s large following.

On Thursday, “Charmed” actress and political activist Alyssa Milano took to Twitter to express her frustrations that “The Joe Rogan Experience” has more listeners than her “Sorry Not Sorry” podcast. As seen in the tweet below, Milano acknowledged that Rogan’s show has three times as many listeners as her own.

Users also noted that the difference in listeners between the two shows could be due to the fact that Rogan’s podcast is over 10 years old, while hers has only been in existence for a little over a year.

Sources: International Business Times, BroBible

UFC announces deal with Venum to replace Reebok as exclusive outfitting partner in April 2021

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Venum will take over as the UFC’s new apparel partner beginning in April 2021, the promotion announced Friday. The UFC’s apparel deal with Reebok runs through March 2021, but the company will stay on as the UFC’s official footwear brand through the end of next year, per a release.

Unlike Reebok, Venum is a company which focuses mainly on combat sports and martial arts and has since it was founded in France in 2006. Before the relationship between the UFC and Reebok, many fighters had Venum as a sponsor.

Reebok represented a major name brand affiliated with the UFC, which at the time was striving for mainstream acceptance. But it was a rocky relationship. The initial rollout featured extremely generic looking fight gear, rife with the misspelling of athlete’s names. Fighters and managers were critical of the amount of money athletes stood to lose without sponsor patches on fight gear allowed. On top of that, there was concern that every fighter wearing the same uniform would strip the sport, which has its fair share of over-the-top characters, of its individuality.

The dynamic between the UFC and Reebok did improve over time. The UFC desired a cleaner look and presentation on television and pay-per-view and in that aspect Reebok was viewed as a success. The guaranteed, consistent money that came from Reebok became more welcome to some fighters – especially the ones not at the top of the card – compared to having to scratch and claw for sponsors every fight.

Source: ESPN