Nikon Exiting The DSLR Market To Focus On Mirrorless Models

Japanese camera maker Nikon will withdraw from the single-lens reflex camera business and shift toward digital offerings amid intensifying competition from smartphone cameras, Nikkei has learned.

Nikon’s SLR cameras have been widely used by professional photographers for more than 60 years and have come to be seen as synonymous with the Japanese company.

It now plans to focus resources on mirrorless cameras, which have become mainstream products on the back of more advanced digital technologies.

Nikon’s cameras have been losing out to smartphones, which increasingly feature powerful cameras. Nikon aims to beat them by offering products with more unique features.

Since June 2020, when Nikon launched its flagship D6 SLR, no new SLR models have been released. The company has already stopped development of compact digital cameras.

From now on, Nikon intends to focus on digital mirrorless cameras, but production and distribution of existing SLR models will continue.

Nikon is the second largest SLR maker after Canon. An SLR camera uses a mirror to reflect an image the photographer sees through the viewfinder.

Nikon dates from 1917 and adopted the company name in 1946. It released its first SLR in 1959, and has long been held in high esteem by professional photographers and journalists. It made its name offering top quality alternatives to German makes such as Leica that once dominated the market.

By the late 1990s, Nikon had made the switch to digital SLRs. Last year, it sold more than 400,000 SLRs, competing head to head with global leader Canon. SLRs are also produced by Ricoh under the brand Pentax.

Mirrorless cameras have a different viewing system and use image sensors that convert light into electrical signals. Like SLRs, they can accept interchangeable lenses that offer much more range than the fixed focal lengths used in most smartphone cameras. A feature of Nikon cameras has been the F-mount introduced in 1959. It has always allowed photographers to use a wide range of old lenses on recent SLRs.

Shipments of mirrorless cameras overtook SLRs for the first time in 2020 with 2.93 million and 2.37 million units shipped respectively, according to Japan’s Camera & Imaging Products Association.

There has been an overall decline, however. The combined market peaked at 11.67 million cameras in 2017, but had fallen to 5.34 million by 2021.

The dramatic falloff has forced Nikon to focus on the segment that still has potential to grow. In 2021, the market for mirrorless cameras expanded 31% to 324.5 billion yen, even as that for SLR cameras dropped 6% to 91.2 billion yen.

Mirrorless cameras have powerful capabilities. Artificial intelligence provides facial and pupil recognition. They can also identify animals, vehicles and objects. 

The Nikon Z9, released last year, can shoot 120 images per second — more than ten times faster that most SLRs without the wear and tear of a moving mirror. This makes them ideal for sports and wildlife photography. Mirrorless cameras are lighter, smaller and virtually silent. 

Mirrorless cameras have also been coming down in price to below 100,000 yen ($730), which is less than comparable SLRs.

With enhanced viewfinders and less lag, the quicker image processing helps photographers in fast-moving situations. 

Mirrorless cameras already account for half the revenue from Nikon’s imaging products business, compared with about 30% for SLRs. In the year ending in March, sales of imaging products totaled 178.2 billion yen, or 33% of total group revenues.

Rival Canon also plans to follow Nikon and stop producing flagship SLR models within a few years. 

Source: Nikkei Asia

Photography Tips: Full Frame & Crop Sensor Cameras

What is the difference between Full Frame & Crop Sensor? Full Frame or Crop Sensor – which is better? What is the best sensor size? These questions are asked a lot and it can be very confusing.

Both sensor sizes have benefits and potential ‘costs’ attached to them. A full frame has less depth of filed than a crop – so for blurry background portraits a FF will be better, but for big depth of field maybe a crop sensor camera. But that will have less resolution… and so it goes on.

So I’ve distilled it down to the basics to explain the advantages and dis-advantages of both to help you chose which works best for you.

Mike Browne

Canon Issues Statement Regarding Overheating Concerns With New EOS R5 and R6 Cameras When Video Recording

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In the statement, Canon said that the R5’s combination of high resolution, high video frame rate, high bit rate, and usage of the full width of the sensor all create a lot of heat. In order to combat this, the company used a magnesium alloy body to help dissipate internally generated heat, along with an “overheat control” function for reducing any heat generation while the camera is in standby mode. In addition to these features, the company also clarified that they decided not to install a fan in the R5 because it would have increased its size and weight and compromised its weather resistance.

Source: Fstoppers

Canon’s EOS R5 Is the Brand’s Most Powerful Full-Frame Mirrorless

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Dubbed the EOS R5, the upcoming camera uses a newly-designed image sensor and processor to enable no-crop capture of both 8K and 4K video recordings. The former can be shot in a RAW format while the latter can reach up to 120 frames-per-second, and amazing feat for a camera of this size. All its 8K and 4K modes will support Dual Pixel CMOS AF, and a new advanced animal AF mode has been integrated, which is capable of tracking animal eyes, but also their faces and bodies if the eyes aren’t visible. It boasts five-axis in-body image stabilization which works in tandem with optical image stabilization offered by both RF and EF lenses. Of course, it also carries dual card slots to allow for both a CF card and SD card. Most impressively, Canon has announced a price tag of “under $4,000” USD, an exceptional price for a video recording workhorse with specs which can reportedly outperform the $39,000-USD full-frame Sony Venice.

Source: HypeBeast