Food Personality Eddie Huang Announces Closure of Baohaus NYC – Taiwanese Pork Belly Buns that Catapulted ‘Fresh Off The Boat’ Autobiography & TV Show on Asian American Experience

Eddie Huang has just announced the official closing of the bao shop that started it all. Opened in 2009, Huang and his close friends/partners set out to tell their story through food, via delicious pork belly buns (gua bao) to be exact, and Baohaus in New York City‘s Lower East Side was born. Two years later, Baohaus moved to a larger location in East Village where they remained up until now.

The popularity of his New York establishment has aided in catapulting Huang into the fields in which he has always believed saw the least bit of Asian-American presence — Television, film, and literature — to which he has now all successfully offered his voice to. Huang points out that it was not an easy decision with, “We held out as long as we could, but we have decided to close. Shouts to the customers that ran in thinking we were open, it means a lot. It’s been a wild and fulfilling 10-year ride with Baohaus but I’d be lying if I said ‘I can’t believe what’s happened.’”

In the Instagram post, Huang shouted out his team, plugged his upcoming film Boogie, quoted Raekwon, and paid his respects to Prodigy and Anthony Bourdain. And with that, Baohaus turned on their glowing-blue neon sign for the last time. It’s on to the next adventure for the Human Panda.

Source: Hypebeast

Boneless Wings

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Since Chicken Strip is trending on Twitter (Ross Stripling), I’d just like to settle the debate on ppl saying boneless wings are “like chicken nuggets”— They’re more like mini chicken strips because you can still see the muscle of the breast. Nuggets are grounded, reshaped, chicken mush!

Outdoor dining and drinking is allowed. But is it safe? 7 questions about outdoor dining and drinking in the pandemic, answered

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1) Why is outside dining and drinking considered safer?

In an outdoor space, “there would generally be much more air movement, so particles containing the virus would dissipate faster,” he told me.

2) What counts as “outdoors”?

“I think large tents with a top and open sides can still be called outside. In hotter climates and on sunnier days, the shade protection is necessary for comfort and sun protection,” Gloster said. “Air can still circulate freely in those environments.”

3) Are we putting staff at risk?

Yes. The general rule is every time we expose ourselves to more people, we increase our risk to ourselves and to the people we come into contact with. This is why health directives have specifically said to minimize nonessential trips and contact with other people.

4) What can bars and restaurants do to keep patrons safe?

If you’re trying to assess whether the restaurant you’re considering eating at is taking precautions seriously, distanced tables, masked staff, and enhanced sanitation measures are all hallmarks to look out for.

5) So how are we supposed to eat and drink with masks on?

“Keep your mask on while waiting for your food, take it off and eat, and then put it back on when you are done is the best strategy,” she said. “Make sure that you put your mask away and not just on the table unless you have sanitized it or you feel it’s a clean surface.”

6) Who should we be eating with?

The ongoing advice from health officials has been that the people we live with — families, roommates, significant others — are the only people we should be interacting with. That’s because we share the same environments and risk levels with said people and, ideally, have open communication about things like commutes, essential trips, etc., that we are taking.

7) What’s working in South Korea? And can it work here?

One of the things South Korea has been able to do well is not only get its citizens to buy into the social distancing measures, but also supplement that with robust and extensive contact tracing — essentially testing as many people as possible who were in contact with someone who was sick.

Source: Vox

Trader Joe’s to discontinue ethnic-sounding names (“Trader Ming’s,” “Trader José,” “Trader Giotto’s) on international food products considered ‘racist branding and packaging’

The label perpetuate harmful stereotypes, according to the social media campaign. “The Trader Joe’s branding is racist because it exoticizes other cultures — it presents ‘Joe’ as the default ‘normal’ and the other characters falling outside of it — they are ‘Arabian Joe,’ ‘Trader José’ and ‘Trader Joe San,’ the petition states.

The petition added, “The common thread between all of these transgressions is the perpetuation of exoticism, the goal of which is not to appreciate other cultures, but to further other and distance them from the perceived ‘normal’.”

“While this approach to product naming may have been rooted in a lighthearted attempt at inclusiveness, we recognize that it may now have the opposite effect — one that is contrary to the welcoming, rewarding customer experience we strive to create every day,” company spokeswoman Kenya Friend-Daniel said.

Source: CBS News

The Halal Guys’ Chicken And Gyro Platter Is NYC’s Most Legendary Street Food

The Halal Guys first came to the streets of New York City in 1990, when the three founders opened up a hot-dog cart in Midtown. They realized there was a demand from Muslim cab drivers looking for a halal meal, so they began serving American halal food from the cart. The Arabic term halal means ‘lawful’ and is often used in Islam to describe meat that is permissible to eat based on specific religious guidelines. But in New York, many people know halal as the affordable food they can find at many street carts across the city. At The Halal Guys’ original cart on 53rd Street and 6th Avenue, people wait in line for the iconic combo platter, a foil dish packed with chicken and gyro over rice, accompanied by lettuce, tomato, pita, and the famous and secret red and white sauces.

Editor’s Note: This episode was filmed in January 2020. The Halal Guys’ carts in New York City are currently open for takeout while restaurant locations provide both takeout and delivery. Check with your nearest location for details.

2016 – Celebrity Chef Eddie Huang on the Oppressive Whiteness of the Food World; Tears into Food Network Eater and Praises Ghetto Gastro on Instagram

But what makes it all worse is that one of the things Eater has done is help push a kind of restaurant consensus around that monoculture, which goes a little like this: notable chef, must speak English, must be media-savvy, must have design-driven dining room, must kowtow to the scene, must have small plates, must push diverse histories through French ricers, must have toast points, must love dogs. Eater’s not alone in doing this — plenty of others do, too (including Grub Street). But the result is a formula that has basically condo-ized New York’s food culture with some ultimately pretty conservative, even intolerant, values. Which means maybe it shouldn’t be a surprise that there’s a penitent skinhead near the top of Eater’s food chain. But it is a reason to try and shake things up. Food is so essential to our lives and social ecosystem that this news should be a signal not just to question the people in these positions of power but to question the positions themselves.

Source: Grub Street