Santa Ana Police Officers Blast Disney Tunes At Scene To Avoid YouTube Video Recording

video posted on YouTube shows Santa Ana police officers waking up a neighborhood during an investigation Monday night as they blasted Disney music from one of their patrol vehicles to stop a YouTuber from recording on scene.

In the video, an officer said they were at a scene near West Civic Center Drive and North Western Avenue for a vehicle theft investigation.

The first song heard playing in the video is “You’ve Got a Friend in Me” from the Disney/Pixar film “Toy Story.”

It was almost 11 p.m. when “We Don’t Talk About Bruno,” “Un Poco Loco,” and other Disney hits filled the air. At one point, the YouTuber is heard telling officers to “have respect for the neighbors.”

The music drags on, waking up people in their homes, including children and Councilmember Johnathan Hernandez.

“It was eerie, and it was discomforting because you don’t hear Disney music being played that loud near 11 o’clock at night,” Hernandez told Eyewitness News during a Zoom interview Wednesday.

Hernandez is seen in the video speaking with one of the officers.

“Why are you doing this?” Hernandez asked.

“Because they get copyright infringement,” the officer replied.

The YouTuber is heard in the recording saying it’s because “he knows I have a YouTube channel.” That channel is called Santa Ana Audits.

On Wednesday, it had more than 3,500 subscribers and appeared to focus on recording SAPD officers on scene, a right protected by the First Amendment as long as there is no interference with police work.

Eyewitness News reached out to professor of music and copyright at Berklee Online Dr. E. Michael Harrington, who said the incident got into copyright law.

“I’ve been reading about it and seeing it on YouTube,” Harrington said. He was talking about officers playing music without purchasing the rights to it, a tactic to discourage recording.

“I think it’s clearly illegal because it is a public performance,” Harrington said of the officers playing the music loud enough for the public to hear.

In addition, when the videos are shared, the person posting it risks fines or even getting banned from the streaming or social media platform.

“YouTube has bots that go around and they match the song they’re hearing, and then if that’s on YouTube and it wasn’t cleared, then the music, the song recording and the copyright, they get taken down, and then the person [who] posted it, who is trying to be a good citizen to say, ‘Watch what this cop did or cops, they should be prosecuted,’ that person now gets a copyright strike for doing an act that’s far more important than what the cops are doing,” Harrington said.

An SAPD spokesperson told ABC7 Wednesday the incident is under investigation.

Chief of Police David Valentin issued a statement confirming the incident involved one of their officers. The statement from Valentin read, “My expectation is that all police department employees perform their duties with dignity and respect in the community we are hired to serve.”

In the YouTube video, Hernandez tells the officer, “I’m embarrassed that this is how you’re treating my neighbors. There’s children here. Have some respect for my community.”

The officer is heard replying, “I realize I made a mistake sir. I apologize.”

The two shake hands in the video.

“You know what? People make mistakes all the time, but unfortunately, we can’t afford to make these mistakes when we’re public servants,” Hernandez told Eyewitness News.

ABC7 reached out to others who witnessed the incident, but they didn’t feel comfortable going on the record, saying they feared retaliation. People in the neighborhood said this wasn’t the first time they’ve seen this happen.

Harrington said copyright fines can run anywhere from $750 to $150,000.

That’s times two because both the writer and the owner of the recording can take legal action.

Source: ABC7

EDD Wants Its Unemployment Money Back — Clawback Program Requires People Who Got Unemployment Assistance To Prove They Were Working Or Seeking Work

A musician who lost all her unemployment documents when her home burned in a wildfire. An arborist who filed for unemployment assistance a year before the pandemic began. A tattoo artist who can’t prove he was working because he ran a cash operation.

These are just a few Californians caught in a state dragnet to recover money from fraudulent unemployment claims.

Late last year, California’s Employment Development Department launched a clawback program, requiring some 1.4 million people who received federal pandemic unemployment assistance to retroactively prove they were working or seeking work. That program, which ended in September, was aimed at helping people who don’t usually qualify for unemployment benefits because they are freelancers or small-business owners.

As of Jan. 4, one out of five recipients who received the notice has responded. The state says a majority have been deemed eligible and won’t have to repay, but some are unable to provide documentation, leaving them on the hook to repay benefits that could add up to tens of thousands of dollars. If they can’t pay, the state could collect the money in a variety of ways, such as wage garnishments or taking them to court.

“They are going to want money back from me that I don’t have,” said Donna Casey, a musician who could owe EDD more than $30,000 after losing her home in the August Complex fire in 2020. “What are they going to do to me, put me in jail? At least I’ll have a place to live.”

Policy experts had warned against the clawback program, noting it would hurt poor Californians who were already disproportionately sidelined from the job market by the pandemic.

Even former federal prosecutor McGregor Scott, hired by the state to lead a separate investigation into large-scale unemployment fraud, expressed skepticism that the effort would recoup much of some $20 billion lost to fraudulent claims, including millions of dollars of state-approved payments to prison inmates. Advocates suggested letting claimants like Casey keep the money regardless of proof, but the state is holding firm.

That’s left many Californians in a bind.

Some who were contacted by EDD said they are terrified of losing their homes. Many are furious that the responsibility fell on them after they already received the money. And others simply don’t know where to turn for help.

Casey had lost gigs and stopped selling homemade jewelry at festivals when the lockdown began. Then she lost all her documentation when her house in Trinity County burned in a wildfire, just after her daughter died of a lung infection.

Unemployment was a lifesaver as Casey searched for work throughout the pandemic, including applying to an Amazon warehouse. But, at 67-years-old, she couldn’t lift enough to qualify for the job.

Casey, however, never thought she might have to pay back her benefits.

Now living in Berkeley with one of her daughters, Casey has some photos of her old business cards that she’ll send to the agency. She also hopes EDD will speak with the music groups she played with – but she worries that won’t cut it.

Similarly, at the start of the pandemic, Sasha Emery was living in an RV partly paid for by federal emergency funds after her Paradise home burned down. After finally getting into affordable housing during the pandemic, she signed up for unemployment when the few available jobs didn’t pan out.

When the notice arrived asking for proof or repayment, shock turned into tears. All Emery has to offer are records of her dire situation: food stamps, Medi-Cal documentation and potentially the federal assistance she received after the fire.

If a recipient can’t offer the necessary proof, and cannot repay the funds at once or in installments that could include 3% interest, EDD may seek the money in a number of ways. The agency could put a lien on property, take up to 25% of a recipient’s wages, withhold state and federal tax refunds or lottery winnings, deduct benefits from future unemployment or state disability insurance benefits, or file a lawsuit.

Source: The OC Register

Orange Coast College Professor Emeritus John Upton, Noted Photography Icon, Dies

John Upton, one of the founders of the well-respected photography department at Orange Coast College who taught there for more than 40 years, died on Dec. 7 in Petaluma. He was 88.

Upton died due to complications from lung cancer, the school announced.

A former San Clemente and Laguna Woods resident, Upton had moved to Petaluma two years ago to be closer to his family, his daughter, Sean, said.

“He always had an eye for photography,” Sean Upton said. “The day that I drove him to the hospital, which was just two weeks ago, he was looking out the window appreciating places that he may photograph someday. So, he was always looking through the eye of the lens of the photographer.”

John Upton was born in Iowa and moved to the San Fernando Valley when he was 5 years old, his daughter said. He went to art school in San Francisco, at the California School of the Fine Arts, studying with contemporaries like Ansel Adams and Edward Weston before he was drafted into the U.S. Army during the Korean War in 1953.

Upton came back to Southern California and became a faculty member at Orange Coast College in 1960. He retired in 1999 but continued to teach a gallery class part time for several years.

Upton and his then-wife, Barbara London, published the influential college textbook “Photography” in 1976. There are more than 1.5 million copies in print.

“Things that other people see as common knowledge, John would sort of miss,” said OCC Photography Department Chair Blade Gillissen, a student of Upton’s at the junior college in the 1990s. “He was so tuned into photography. I remember one day trying to talk to him, back when the [Los Angeles] Lakers started doing better again with Kobe [Bryant] and [Shaquille O’Neal]. And he had no idea who I was talking about.”

The gallery class provided joy for Upton later in his life. Gillissen said he and Upton would each drive a van full of students to art galleries and museums throughout Southern California on Saturdays, with Upton acting as a docent.

“I haven’t offered it since he stopped teaching it,” Gillissen said. “I don’t know anyone off the top of my head that could teach it like he did it.”

Sean Upton called her father one of the premier art historians in the U.S. Last January, Orange Coast College opened a survey exhibition of his fine art work at the Frank M. Doyle Arts Pavilion on campus. The exhibit ran until mid-March, when the school was shut down due to the novel coronavirus pandemic.

The survey had selections from four main bodies of work: early work, “Japanalia,” “Jungle Road” and the more recent “Petaluma.” John Upton was an avid fan of Asian art and culture and would visit Japan yearly for decades, Sean Upton said.

The exhibition was curated by Tyler Stallings, director/senior curator at the Doyle.

“He was mainly known as an educator, for the book and what he did for the photography department at OCC,” Stallings said. “He’s always been making work, but as a busy teacher, he didn’t always have the time to get his work out there. That was the angle of the show.”

Later in his life, Upton also collaborated with longtime friend and part-time OCC Photography Department instructor John Hesketh, who would print his photography.

“John was one of the sweetest and most giving people around,” Hesketh said. “I had a commercial father of photography [Dean], and John was kind of my fine art father of photography. He was very, very dedicated to photography itself and what it meant to be a fine art photographer, or an artist that was lens-based … He was like this elder statesman that represented photography in its best, kindest way. He was very generous in encouraging other people to do what they could do.”

Source: LA Times

Elderly Asian Airbnb Owner Slapped After Telling Group To Leave In Chicago

A video showing an elderly Asian man being slapped across the face as he hands some money back to a young man and his friends staying at his Airbnb in Chicago has been circulating on social media.

The footage, first posted on Dec. 7 at 10 p.m., shows an elderly Asian man handing some cash back to a group of friends before being slapped by one of them.

The elderly man was visibly taken aback by the assault.

Social media users initially believed the location of the incident to be a store in Chicago after the original uploader of the video, “Slick Getem,” wrote in the caption, “Somebody said Made his ass think abt the cat he put innat Chinese food.”

One of the people who claimed to be in the group involved in the incident told NextShark that the man was the owner of the Airbnb they were staying at in Chicago.

They claim the elderly man hit their friend and that the video was blown out of proportion. They added that they can’t make their page public after receiving hate and threats. The Facebook user has since deleted their page. The user who originally uploaded the video also changed his name to “Sli Ck.”

Comments on a Facebook post criticizing the group claimed they were kicked out of the rented Airbnb for being “loud and smoking.”

TikTok user KarmaChibana, who has more than 800,000 followers on the platform, caught wind of the video and reacted to it.

“That is not an excuse to use racial stereotypes against him and slap him in the face,” Karma starts off.

“Just like how the Asian and other communities were there for our movement, why can’t we do the same for them? To my Black brothers and sisters, we have to do better. We need to stand up for our Asian brothers and sisters. I know there’s anti-Black within their community, but we shouldn’t generalize.”

NextShark reached out to the Chicago Police Department which could not verify the location of the incident.

Source: NextShark

E-cigarettes CAN worsen heart and lung conditions and must not be considered harmless, Government report finds

Vaping can worsen heart disease and lung disorders while the risks posed by inhaling flavouring ingredients are still ‘unknown’, according to the government backed research.

The independent Committee on Toxicity of Chemicals in Food, Consumer Products and the Environment (COT) said e-cigarettes should only be used as a stop-smoking aid.

The report warned users who do not already use tobacco products ‘risk negative effects on their health’ by vaping.

Health threats to bystanders were considered low but people can suffer an increased heart rate from high nicotine exposure, if stood close to someone vaping, it said.

Professor Alan Boobis, Chair of the COT, said it was wrong to consider the devices as ‘harmless’.

Source: Daily Mail

Full House Actress Lori Loughlin Gets 2 Months Jail Time And Husband Mossimo Giannulli Gets 5 In 2019 College Admissions Bribery Scandal To Get Their 2 Daughters Into USC

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The couple paid $500,000 to college admissions mastermind Rick Singer to get their daughters into USC as crew recruits—with falsified athletic records—as part of a larger bribery scheme, according to court documents.

At least 53 and $25 million. That’s how many people have been charged as part of the scandal.  And at least 33 parents have been accused of paying $25 million to Singer from 2011 to 2018 as part of the scheme.

Loughlin has “a fairytale life,” the judge said. As he handed down the sentence, he addressed her, saying, “you stand before me a convicted felon, and for what? The inexplicable desire to have even more.” He told Giannulli during his earlier sentencing: “You are an informed, smart, successful businessman. You certainly did know better, and you helped sponsor a breathtaking fraud on our admissions system.

The college admissions scandal investigation, codenamed “Operation Varsity Blues” by the Department of Justice, was made public in March 2019. The group of parents accused in the case were believed to have used phony athletic, academic and test score records, along with bribery, to get their children into Yale, Stanford and USC, among other schools. All but one parent have been sentenced to prison time. Loughlin’s daughter (and influencer) Olivia Jade Giannulli has not returned to USC since August 2019. She was falsely presented to USC as an accomplished coxswain in crew, and fake photos were taken of her on a rowing machine.

Source: Forbes

NYPD Finally Forms Asian Hate Crime Task Force After Months of COVID-19 Racism

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For the first time since COVID-19 arrived in the U.S., the New York Police Department created an Asian Hate Crime Task Force to address the surge of abusive incidents against Asian Americans.

Since March 21, the department has made 17 arrests from 21 anti-Asian hate crimes in the city, which became the pandemic’s epicenter in the same month.

“This increase was cultivated due to the anti-Asian rhetoric about the virus that was publicized, and individuals began to attack Asian New Yorkers, either verbal attack or physical assault. We saw a spike in every borough throughout the city,” Chief of Detectives Rodney Harrison said on Tuesday, according to ABC 7.

The NYPD released videos in April, where Harrison and Officer Regina Ou, condemned these attacks and urged victims of Asian bias-related hate crimes to report these incidents.

Harrison recalled Asian New Yorkers being attacked in public transport such as buses and trains, as well as in restaurants and even their own neighborhoods. But while the existing Hate Crimes Task Force has done a “good job” investigating those incidents, several complainants were reluctant to follow up.

Source: NextShark

TikTok/YouTube stars Alan & Alex Stokes (Stokes Twins) charged with felony after fake Irvine bank robbery pranks that led to police responses at Metropolis Apartments & UC Irvine

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Two 23-year old twins face criminal charges for a prank in which authorities say they staged a fake bank robbery in Irvine that resulted in a police response, including officers holding an unsuspecting Uber driver at gunpoint.

Alan and Alex Stokes, 23, of Irvine each were charged with a felony count of false imprisonment and a misdemeanor count of falsely reporting an emergency, according to the Orange County District Attorney’s Office.

Prosecutors allege that around 2:30 p.m. on Oct. 15, 2019, the brothers – dressed in black, wearing ski masks and carrying duffel bags full of cash – pretended like they had just robbed a bank, while their videographer filmed them.

According to the DA’s office, the brothers ordered an Uber, but the driver – who was unaware of the alleged prank – refused to drive them anywhere. A bystander, believing the two men had robbed a bank and were trying to carjack the driver, called 911.

Irvine officers ordered the Uber driver out of the car at gunpoint, then released him after determining he hadn’t committed a crime. The officers let the Stokes brothers go with a warning, according to the DA’s office.

Prosecutors allege that four hours later the brothers carried out a similar prank on the UC Irvine campus, and officers once again responded to reports of a bank being robbed. The men left before officers arrived.

Source: OC Register

Rapper China Mac Holds Successful Protest At Seth Low Park (Bensonhurst) After 89-Year-Old Asian Woman Set On Fire; Brooklyn Police Not Treating Incident As Hate Crime

Protesters gathered outside a New York Police Department precinct in Brookyln, New York, to protest against police action on August 1 after an elderly Asian woman was robbed and set on fire.

The protest featured a speech from rapper and former gang member China Mac, who wore a shirt saying “proud af to be Asian” and told the crowd the incident “looked like a hate crime to me” and suggested the officers knew it was a hate crime.

Local media reported the 89-year-old was robbed after leaving her Bensonhurst home on July 14. Police told ABC7 there was no evidence she was specifically targeted and no derogatory remarks were made by the suspects.

Source: Yahoo

K-Pop Fans Flooded #WhiteLivesMatter and #BlueLivesMatter Hashtags on Twitter and Instagram with Fancams and Memes to Drown Out Racist Posts

K-pop stans have emerged as hashtag heroes amid Black Lives Matter protests across the country, and after coordinating to spam a Dallas Police Department reporting app with fancams earlier this week, they’re using their collective might to drown out tags like #whitelivesmatter and #bluelivesmatter on Twitter and Instagram with fancams and other memes.

The content spam is borne out of a desire to render the hashtags essentially unusable as a means of spreading racist or anti-Black Lives Matter content.

Source: Insider