Al Pastor Papi – The Al Pastor King Of San Francisco (Street Food Icons)

Miguel Escobedo loves three things: San Francisco, DJing, and al pastor, a spit-roasted pork popular in Mexican cuisine. Originally from Mexico City, Miguel’s passions have spawned a career making some of the best Mexican food in the Bay Area, and his current project, Al Pastor Papi, focuses on perfecting the al pastor experience. Miguel talks about his journey deep into the history of al pastor, where he learned about the food’s roots in Lebanon, and about how giving back to the community he loves has made his culinary career even richer.

Apple and Tesla are doing stock splits. Here’s what that actually means to investors

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When a company splits its stock, its total value doesn’t change; it just ends up with more stocks, each at a cheaper cost.

Here’s a food metaphor: If you ask the guy at the pizzeria to cut each slice in your large pie in half, you’ll still go home with the same amount of pizza. You just have more, smaller slices now.

Companies typically say they’re splitting their stocks to make them affordable to more people.

But, is that reality? It’s more of a way to grab headlines and bring in money, said certified financial planner Douglas Boneparth, founder and president of Bone Fide Wealth in New York.

“This was done as a marketing tool to get smaller investors to invest in the stock,” Boneparth said. “The actual mechanics of the company are the same.”

And therefore, so are your chances of making a profit on either Tesla or Apple, experts say.

“People ultimately want to know, ‘What does this mean for my bottom line?’” Boneparth said. “The answer is: nothing.”

If you own Apple in an index fund, for example, it’s as if you had a dollar that just turned into four quarters, Boneparth said.

Source: CNBC

“I Had To Change My Name”: Real-Life Karens On Becoming A Meme

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Urban Dictionary defines “Karen” as “the stereotypical name associated with rude, obnoxious, and insufferable middle-aged white women. In other words, a “Karen” is the type of woman who demands to speak to your manager or complains when you stand in the grocery store express line. Chances are, you’ve personally been victimized by a “Karen” — you just knew them by Amy, Sarah, or Emily. “Karen” — one of the top 10 most common names for baby girls born in the 1950s and 60s — has evolved into much more than a moniker. Now, American Karens are forced to reckon with their name becoming a symbol of white privilege.

While not all Karens are coming up with nicknames, many agree that “Karenphobia” has gotten out of hand. “The basis of the meme is fair, but what started out as a meme which rightfully called out white women on their privilege has evolved into a politically correct way for people to insult women,” Karen M. says.

So, could the world possibly be on the brink of a Karen rebellion? “I think that there will be a larger push back against the meme, and it will be led by women, but not that it will necessarily be women named Karen,” Karen M. says. There’s only one problem: raising a complaint with “systemic Karen-ism” might play into the very meme they’re fighting against.

Source: Bustle