‘You Are Always Dispensable’: Woman Says That After She Left Her Job, She Was Replaced In 3 Hours

A TikToker says that after she left a job for which she worked overtime frequently, she was replaced within three hours of leaving.

Norah Myers, a TikToker who posts about wellness, said in a video Wednesday that she left a job for which she “went in early every morning, left late, and worked weekends.”

“You are always dispensable,” Myers says in her video, which on Monday had over 4 million views. “No job is worth your mental and physical health ever.”

In her video’s comments, Myers shared that after leaving another corporate job, she was replaced by two people. Both were fired within a month.

“All that matters at the end of the day is your relationships with family and friends,” Myers commented on her video.

Commenters on Myers’ video heartily agreed with her sentiment.

“Always remember, we work for ourselves, not for a company, even if we are working with the nicest people,” @emegrimaldi commented.

“No job is ever worth our health, ever. It means everything to us, and nothing to them,” @mypearwontgrow wrote.

“This is so true and so disheartening,” @kianahkaydijohn commented. “But it’s good to learn.”

Others shared their experiences leaving jobs that they felt didn’t value them.

“When I left a toxic company that didn’t value my work, they had to hire two people to do my job,” @rigovgd commented. “They wouldn’t give me a raise but did that instead.”

“I left a job that I worked so hard at. They replaced me in 1 day,” @mr.buggles wrote. “The mental anguish I felt at that place was bad.”

The Body Shop Retires From ‘Anti-Aging’ To Celebrate Beauty In All Stages

The Body Shop’s Drops of Youth range is one of its best-selling skincare selections, with its serum being its hottest item across the board (it’s said a bottle is sold every 23 seconds). While those are marks of a good product, the name is telling of the way beauty is being perceived by consumers, and the industry’s role in propagating such ideals.

As such, the British beauty brand is reversing the harsh effects of its message about aging and rebranding Drops of Youth to Edelweiss. Changes are being made beyond skin-deep as the range will get a new formulation too, along with more products to the line to serve a greater depth of skin concerns.

The Body Shop was moved to rethink its most-loved products following a Global Self Love Index it commissioned in 2021, as part of a self-love campaign. That concluded with the dire, overwhelming response by people around the world who believed the beauty industry largely influenced poor self-esteem with its unrealistic claims and imagery. The majority seemed to have this perception, The Drum reports.

The pessimistic results forced The Body Shop to look into how it might have also been responsible for pushing some of those unachievable expectations onto customers, be it through its language or products. As a company rooted in activism, it recalibrated to see how it could empower shoppers instead.

The new and improved Edelweiss range has double the Edelweiss extract of the original. This natural component is said to have 43% more antioxidant qualities than Retinol, making the collection especially effective at strengthening the skin’s barrier while boosting the ability to heal itself. The flower, after all, has been able to withstand severe winds, snow, and rain in the Alpines.

The Edelweiss flower has been used in folk medicine throughout the years. In today’s metropolises, it holds out against harsh blue light and pollution. 

Instead of prolonging youth, the range’s true strength, evidenced by its marketing too, is resilience—both inward and outward.

Expanding from the original lineup of the Concentrate, Liquid Peel, Serum Concentrate Sheet Mask, and Eye Serum Concentrate, there are also two new products—Edelweiss Cleansing Concentrate and Edelweiss Intense Smoothing Cream—to meet various skincare needs.

The Body Shop is also doubling down on its B-corp certification and love of nature by reformulating the range such that it comes from 90% natural origins and is vegan-certified.

Source: DesignTAXI

Verizon Wireless Price Increase Shocker: A $12 Monthly Bump On Shared Data Plans—The Telecom That Reported $22 Billion In 2021 Profits Says Its An ‘Economic Adjustment’ To Keep Up With ‘Rising Operational Costs’

Many Verizon Wireless customers have been infuriated after receiving notification from the telecom that their monthly bill for data will go up as much as $12 due to “rising operational costs.” 

Of course, price increases are part of the telecom business shell game, but they typically heat the proverbial waters around the ol‘ lobster by marginal increments — such as the $1.35 “economic adjustment” fee increase applied by Verizon this month to its postpaid customers for “administrative cost” increases. 

But consumers will definitely feel 12 bucks.

Verizon’s move follows a very similar price bump announced earlier this month by AT&T — single-line-of-service customers got a $6-a-month increase, while AT&T shared data customers saw a monthly surge of $12.

Verizon said its increase will take effect “no sooner” than August 2.

Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg raised the possibility of such a price bump during his company’s first-quarter earnings report, suggesting something simply had to be done to keep up with inflationary pressure. (He didn’t mention any adjustments to his own executive compensation, which exceeded $20 million last year.)

Thanks, Obama?

Blaming the current administration for inflation has been a go-to messaging point for far-right media outlets as they propagandize for the November midterm elections. And that agenda seems to be catching on, based on President Joe Biden’s currently low approval ratings. But increasingly, it appears that corporate greed might be a principal driver for the current upward price pressure we’re all experiencing.

study by the Economic Policy Institute published in April found that more than half of the overall increase in consumer pricing can be attributed to initiatives intended to drive “fatter corporate profits.”

Source: NextTV

Boosie: Elon Musk Needs To Buy IG! He’d Let Me Talk My Shit! He Don’t Give A Fuck!

In this clip, Boosie reacted to Elon Musk buying Twitter and said he hopes that the tech billionaire will acquire Instagram as well. Boosie and Vlad talked about how much money Musk really has to have in order to buy a publicly traded company outright. Later, Boosie talked about his friendship with the Saudi prince and Vlad warned him about indulging his vices while over there.

Balenciaga Is Selling ‘Destroyed’ Sneakers With Tattered Fabric, Holes, And Dirty Soles For $1,850

Take your old Converse out of the closet and they probably look a lot like Balenciaga’s newest sneakers.

At least that’s what some social media users are saying about the fashion company’s new kicks. Balenciaga is releasing a new collection of distressed shoes called the Paris Sneaker, and some are going for nearly $2,000. The shoes are “extremely worn, marked up, and dirtied,” in Balenciaga’s own words, and they’re already being roasted online.

The priciest pair in the collection is an $1,850 limited edition of women’s high-tops that have “destroyed cotton and rubber” and “rippings all over the fabric,” according to the product listing. They also have dark smudges and marks dirtying the rubber soles and the brand name written in what resembles Sharpie marker. These shoes are available in black and white. Balenciaga says it’ll only sell 100 pairs of these “extra destroyed” shoes.

The collection also includes a pair of less-distressed high-tops available in red, black, and white for $625. Unlike the more expensive pair, these come without slashes in the fabric and have much less prominent smudging on the soles, but they do have scuff marks.

Mules in red, black, and white round out the collection with some fraying and light smudges on the soles. They’ll set you back $495.

In a press release, Balenciaga said the shoes’ worn-out appearance suggests they are “meant to be worn for a lifetime.” The shoes are available for pre-order.

The collection is drawing plenty of attention and criticism online, with one Twitter user posting a picture of the shoes and saying, “Balenciaga is releasing a new pair of shoes, and I have to assume they are just trolling people at this point.”

“Balenciaga is now selling beat-up Converse for $1850,” another Twitter user commented.

“Balenciaga gotta be a social experiment,” a third Twitter user said.

The fashion house is no stranger to controversy and ridicule. Last summer, the brand caught heat for $1,200 sweatpants that some people said “gentrified sagging” and were “tremendously racist.” In 2017, the company debuted a $2,145 tote bag strongly resembling Ikea’s 99-cent blue Frakta bag.

Source: Business Insider

Swedish Company Creates Under-The-Skin Microchip To Carry COVID-19 Passports In User’s Arms

Dystopian nightmare or a simple convenience? A Swedish company implanting microchips under the skin has is promoting its devices for use as a COVID-19 health pass in a country with thousands of early adopters.

“I think it’s very much part of my own integrity to have myself chipped and keep my personal data there with me, I actually feel that it’s even more controlled on my end,” Amanda Back, a Stockholm resident who has implanted the subcutaneous chip developed by DSruptive Subdermals, told AFP.

Though still rare, several thousand Swedes have opted to have an electronic implant inserted under the skin in recent years, eliminating the need to remember key fobs, business cards, public transport cards, and recently: vaccine passes.

The country that created the show “Real Humans” and its English language adaptation “Humans,” is also a stronghold of so-called biohackers who are convinced that humans will become evermore entangled with technology in the future.

“I have a chip implant in my arm and I have programmed the chip so that I have my COVID-19 passport on the chip and the reason is that I always want to have it accessible and when I read my chip, I just swipe my phone on the chip and then I unlock and it opens up,” said Hannes Sjoblad, managing director of DSruptive Subdermals, as a PDF with his vaccine certificate appeared on his phone.

“A chip implant costs a hundred euros if you want to buy the more advanced versions, and you can compare this with for example a health wearable that will cost perhaps twice that but at the same time a chip implant you can use for twenty, thirty, forty years. Whereas a wearable you can only use for three, four years,” he added.

For Sjoblad, the Covid pass is just one example of a possible application, which will be a “thing for the winter of 2021-2022”.

The Swedish entrepreneur added he has a “strong interest in privacy.”

While he acknowledged that many “people see chip implants as a scary technology, as a surveillance technology”, Sjoblad said that instead they should be viewed as a simple ID tag.

“They don’t have a battery, they cannot transmit the signal by themselves, so they’re basically asleep, they can never tell your location, they are only activated when you touch them with your smartphone,” he said.

All implants are voluntary, and if someone were to make them compulsory for prisoners or elderly people in retirement homes, “you will find me on the barricades,” Sjoblad said.

“Nobody can force anyone to get a chip implant.”

Source: Firstpost

PepsiCo Rebrands Aunt Jemima As Pearl Milling Company, Retires Character Based On Racial Stereotype

Aunt Jemima syrups and pancake mixes will be rebranded as Pearl Milling Company, PepsiCo said on Tuesday. 

“Though new to store shelves, Pearl Milling Company was founded in 1888 in St. Joseph, Missouri, and was the originator of the iconic self-rising pancake mix that would later become known as Aunt Jemima,” the company said in a press release.

PepsiCo, which owns Quaker Oats, said in June 2020 it would change the brand name on its Aunt Jemima products, which had long been criticized for their roots in racial stereotypes.

Launched about 130 years ago, the Aunt Jemima brand was in part based on racist stereotyping and imagery, like those seen in minstrel show performances. 

“While work has been done over the years to evolve our brand in a manner intended to be appropriate and respectful, we realize that those changes are not enough,” the company said on its updated website on Tuesday.

Aunt Jemima was one of several brands on grocery store shelves that came under scrutiny last year, as the US erupted with protests following the killing of George Floyd. The Uncle Ben’s brand, owned by Mars, in September became Ben’s Original. That brand also dropped its character image. 

The newly rebranded Pearl Milling products will begin hitting shelves in June, PepsiCo said. The company’s products will continue to be Aunt Jemima until then, though they’ll no longer use the character images. 

The company on Tuesday released pictures of its newly rebranded products, which have the familiar red-white-and-yellow coloring. They’ve been updated with the new brand name, along with smaller tags that say: “New name, same great taste, Aunt Jemima.” 

Along with the rebranding, PepsiCo said Pearl Milling Company planned to announce a $1 million grant program committed to empowering black girls and women. PepsiCo previously announced an about $400 million investment in black businesses and communities, the company said. 

Source: Business Insider

Retired Fortune 100 Executive Thomas B. Walsh Answers To Why So Many People Settle For Low-Paying Jobs With Expensive College Degrees

“Settle” for low-paying jobs?

You can’t be serious, Dude.

There was a time in the US when you could get a great job if you earned a bachelor’s degree in “anything.”

The catch is that JFK was president at the time.

Most parents (and their students) are oblivious to how college really works today.

In some ways it is hard to blame them. Colleges and universities have a powerful public relations team, pushing the message 24/7 that “college is for all.”

The team is made up of educators, guidance counselors, financial aid officers, politicians, pop culture, special interest groups–like the College Board, and college administrators—who are the biggest beneficiaries. Their influence is everywhere.

Many, many years ago, my “anything” degree, Philosophy, was from a state university in fly-over country, better known for its football team than scholarship. (As I vaguely remember, my GPA wasn’t that robust either.)

However, I had a successful career in IT, and retired as an executive from a Fortune 100 company.

The bad news is that college doesn’t work that way anymore.

Years ago very few high school grads (7%) went on to college. (They tended to be the “smart kids.”) If you graduated with a degree in anything, i.e. English, Gender Studies, Comp-lit, Philosophy, etc., you could get a good job.

Over the years a greater and greater portion of high school grads answered the call,

“You have to go to college!”

We are now at 45%. Probably half these teenagers don’t have the “academic firepower” to handle a serious, marketable major.

Back in the day having a college degree was a big deal. By the year 2000, the quality of a college education had deteriorated significantly, and college grads were a-dime-a-dozen. There were too many graduates, but not enough suitable jobs.

Then we got hit with the Great Recession of 2008.

In the US almost anyone can find a college or university that will accept them and their parent’s money.

You might even manage to graduate with some degree or another.

The problem comes when you try to find a real job. Employers aren’t stupid. They are going to sort through that gigantic stack of resumes and find the smart kids.

Today college is a competition for a relatively few (1,100,000) well-paying, professional jobs. Every year colleges and universities churn out 1,900,000 graduates with shiny new bachelor’s degrees. We don’t know the exact number, but a heck of a lot of minimum wage jobs are held by young people with college degrees in stuff like English, Gender Studies, Comp-lit, Philosophy, etc.

Given the high cost of college, that just doesn’t make any economic sense.

PS

The “Anything” Degree

Two decades ago in his book, Another Way To Win, Dr. Kenneth Gray coined the term “one way to win.” He described the OWTW strategy widely followed in the US as:

  • “Graduate from high school.
  • Matriculate at a four-year college.
  • Graduate with a degree in anything.
  • Become employed in a professional job.”

Dr. Gray’s message to the then “academic middle” was that this was unlikely to be a successful strategy in the future. The succeeding twenty years have proven him inordinately prescient and not just for the “academic middle.”

The simple explanation is that it comes down to “supply” (graduates) and “demand” (suitable jobs).

Fifty years ago only seven percent of high school graduates went on to college. In post-WW II America our economy was booming while the economies of many European and Asian countries were–only slowly–being rebuilt. The “Law of Supply and Demand” strongly favored the freshly minted college graduate.

Parents and students noticed how college really paid off, and the “great gold rush” to the halls of higher learning began.

Today my local, Midwest run-of-the-mill high school sends eighty percent of their graduates on to college.

Most of them are going to be very disappointed.

Source: Quora