Heinz Leaves Ketchup Stains On Thrifted Clothing To Make New Apparel

Almost everyone’s gotten ketchup on their clothes at some point, and Heinz, whose name is pretty much synonymous with the condiment, is well aware.

Inspired by these mishaps, it has partnered online resale platform ThredUP tto launch the Heinz Vintage Drip collection, comprising 157 articles of second-hand streetwear and designer pieces intentionally stained with ketchup.

“While Heinz is recognized globally for its iconic glass bottle, keystone, and slow-pouring ketchup, we saw an opportunity to view the stain we’ve been leaving on clothes as another iconic brand symbol and change the narrative from stain to statement,” explained Alyssa Cicero, Brand Manager at Heinz.

“This collection is about sustainably celebrating the character Heinz ketchup stains add to apparel, inviting our fans to embrace a new iconic symbol,” she added.

The release comes at a time when the demand for secondhand clothing is higher than ever, with the 2022 Resale Report showing that 62% of Gen Z and Millennials search for a thrifted item before purchasing it new.

By believing that every outfit deserves a second life, “even summer barbeque casualties,” ThredUp wanted to work on a collection that celebrated reuse, and what better way to appeal to fashion risk-takers and food lovers alike than with ketchup-stained clothes?

In addition to the eco-friendly message, the capsule was specially designed to be inclusive across all sizes and genders, ranging from XXS to XXL. 100% of the proceeds from the sale will go towards Rise Against Hunger to support global hunger relief, so you can feel extra good about your purchase.

Source: DesignTAXI

Four-Year-Old And Five-Year-Old Just Became CEOs With Their Own Fashion Label

Back in June, sisters Mia and Tatiana Escalante made headlines in Australia when they turned up at Australian Fashion Week in matching outfits. And before that, they had already amassed a strong Instagram following for their adorable getups.

Now, the Sydney-based duo, aged five and four, are launching their first apparel line in a brand of their own, the Mia x Tati Store.

The label’s pieces echo what the sisters look for in fashion; clothes are comfy and allow the wearer to run and move around freely.

The Mia x Tati Store features chic, gender-neutral outfits that put comfort at their forefront.

Outside the business, the siblings are kindred spirits and enjoy dressing up in coordinated outfits. Their camaraderie shows on their Instagram account, which now has drawn 748,000 followers since their parents opened it two years ago. In almost no time at all, they were scoring partnerships with brands.

“It just made sense for the girls to start their own fashion brand that really represents their style and show how simple it is to create trendy looks with everyday essentials,” the young fashionistas’ mother, Nga Escalante, told Daily Mail Australia in an interview.

Source: DesignTAXI

UFC announces deal with Venum to replace Reebok as exclusive outfitting partner in April 2021

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Venum will take over as the UFC’s new apparel partner beginning in April 2021, the promotion announced Friday. The UFC’s apparel deal with Reebok runs through March 2021, but the company will stay on as the UFC’s official footwear brand through the end of next year, per a release.

Unlike Reebok, Venum is a company which focuses mainly on combat sports and martial arts and has since it was founded in France in 2006. Before the relationship between the UFC and Reebok, many fighters had Venum as a sponsor.

Reebok represented a major name brand affiliated with the UFC, which at the time was striving for mainstream acceptance. But it was a rocky relationship. The initial rollout featured extremely generic looking fight gear, rife with the misspelling of athlete’s names. Fighters and managers were critical of the amount of money athletes stood to lose without sponsor patches on fight gear allowed. On top of that, there was concern that every fighter wearing the same uniform would strip the sport, which has its fair share of over-the-top characters, of its individuality.

The dynamic between the UFC and Reebok did improve over time. The UFC desired a cleaner look and presentation on television and pay-per-view and in that aspect Reebok was viewed as a success. The guaranteed, consistent money that came from Reebok became more welcome to some fighters – especially the ones not at the top of the card – compared to having to scratch and claw for sponsors every fight.

Source: ESPN

Lululemon apologizes after art director advertises ‘Bat Fried Rice’ shirt; fires employee

Lululemon is apologizing after its art director shared a “bat fried rice” t-shirt design on social media that has been slammed online as “racist” and “anti-Asian” amid the coronavirus pandemic.

On Sunday, Trevor Fleming, the senior global art director of Lululemon, shared a link on Instagram to the t-shirt design first shared by California artist Jess Sluder. (Fleming’s Instagram account has since been deleted.)

The design featured a Chinese take-out box decorated with bat wings and the words “no thank you” on the back. The shirt, titled “Bat Fried Rice,” was listed for purchase at $60 before it was taken down.

Source: USA Today