Anti-Asian Tweets Surface After Teen Vogue Hires New Editor-In-Chief Alexi McCammond

Social media users are calling for the removal of Teen Vogue’s new editor-in-chief after her anti-Asian tweets from as early as 2011 resurfaced.

Alexi McCammond, who was most recently a reporter for Axios, will take on the editorial role from March 24, according to publisher Condé Nast.

“Alexi has the powerful curiosity and confidence that embodies the best of our next generation of leaders,” Anna Wintour, global editorial director of Vogue and chief content officer of Condé Nast, said in a news release on Thursday.

“Her interest in fashion, wellness and important issues in the lives of the Teen Vogue audience and broad knowledge of business leaders, elected officials, influencers, photographers and filmmakers is unrivaled, and I’m so very pleased that she will be bringing her expertise and talents to our team.”

Following the announcement, several Instagram users brought up some of McCammond’s racist tweets from 2011 and 2012.

“Outdone by Asian,” she wrote in one tweet, adding the hashtag “#whatsnew.”

Diana Tsui, editorial director of restaurant guide The Infatuation, described McCammond as a “questionable hire” in an Instagram post. She mentioned that Condé Nast should have addressed McCammond’s problematic past, especially since her appointment comes amid a rise in anti-Asian violence across the country.

“Maybe we can give her some benefit of the doubt as these were done when she was still a student,” Tsui wrote. “But her ‘apology,’ which was only after people caught them in 2019, referred to them as ‘deeply insensitive.’ They are insensitive, they are racist.”

“Teen Vogue has positioned itself as a champion of inclusiveness and empowerment. Is this truly a leader who also embodies these beliefs?” Tsui asks. “Would a leader pre-emptively acknowledge the hurt caused by past actions with a future plan of action, or would a leader just ignore it and hope no one does a Google search?”

Stephen Alain Ko, a cosmetic and skincare formulator who has featured Teen Vogue articles in his website’s #BeautyRecap series, also criticized McCammond’s appointment on Instagram: “Condé Nast, this is not the fashion, beauty or political leadership we deserve… In 2021, I would be disappointed in a magazine that I contributed free labour to — for making a decision that pushed me back into the margins.”

Writer Arabelle Sicardi also took a jab at Condé Nast. “It’s like they want to fail into obsolescence,” she wrote in an Instagram Story. 

Sicardi, who has contributed to Teen Vogue, went on to highlight the prevalence of anti-Asian sentiment in the fashion and media industry. She described McCammond’s hiring as “an affirmation of white supremacy.”

“It is a distinct lack of care for the Asian employees and other people of color that will have to work under new management.”

Source: NextShark

Creative agency founder and CEO Melissa Rein Lively (The Brand Consortium Public Relations, TBCPR) trashes face mask display in Target, tells police she’s a spokesperson for The White House

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An Arizona woman, dubbed the latest “Karen” by social media, filmed herself destroying a face mask display inside a Target store over the weekend.

In the footage, Melissa Rein Lively, who runs a public relations company in Scottsdale, can be heard going on an explosive rant as she points the camera at a display of protective face coverings.

“Finally we meet the end of the road. I’ve been looking forward to this s–t all my f–king life,” says Lively in the video, which has been viewed 5.9 million times.

A second video, also recorded on Instagram Live and which has been viewed 2.6 million times, showed the aftermath of the Target mask debacle: Police officers are seen inside Lively’s garage.

When the officers confront Lively, she informs them she’s a spokesperson for the White House and she can’t share “classified information.”

Source: NY Post

2009 – Minneapolis Police Officer Jason Anderson Cleared in Wrongful Death Trial of Fong Lee

Minneapolis police officer Jason Anderson has been cleared in the wrongful death trial of Fong Lee. The jury at the U.S. District Court in St. Paul found Anderson did not use exessive force, and therefore no damages will be awarded to Fong Lee’s family.

Officer Andersen shot and killed Lee, 19, on July 22, 2006. Some video of the incident was captured on surveillance cameras Cityview Elementary School in north Minneapolis.

The 12-member jury deliberated for roughly six hours between Wednesday and Thursday, after hearing five days of testimony.

During his closing argument Wednesday, Assistant City Attorney Jim Moore played an image at the start of the chase, asking jurors to look in the very lower right corner of the screen as Lee begins to run from police.

He said, “It looks like a gun to him.” Moore also told jurors they may not see the gun in other images because Lee may have had it cupped in his hand.

Lee’s family had argued their son was unarmed, and alleged police planted the gun.

Before deliberating, U.S. District Judge Paul Magnuson instructed the jury to first decide, unanimously, whether Andersen used excessive force. If they decided he did not, they would return with their decision. If they decided he did, they had to decide if he was malicious in his use of force, and if so, how much to award the Lee family in damages.

Statement from Police Chief Tim Dolan

Officer Andersen acted with courage and integrity in fulfilling his duty to serve and protect the people of Minneapolis. Unfortunately, in return, the department and Officer Andersen have had to endure highly inflammatory accusations that have unfairly caused hardship for him and his family. We are pleased that Officer Andersen has been vindicated, and now hope that we can all move forward and heal as a community.

Whole Foods CEO reportedly recommends that employees ‘donate’ PTO to one another amidst the coronavirus pandemic

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Whole Foods CEO John Mackey reportedly sparked some ire by suggesting that employees “donate” their paid time off to coworkers sick with the coronavirus.

Vice’s Motherboard reported that Mackey sent out an email to store-level workers on Wednesday, outlining company protocols and benefits amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. His memo included a note highlighting the grocery company’s longstanding policy of allowing employees to “donate” PTO to sick or grieving coworkers “across the country.”

Source: Business Insider