Skittles Commissions LGBTQ+ Artists To Design Its Pride Packaging For 2022

Pride Month is just weeks away, and you can almost taste it—the rainbow, that is. As an annual tradition, Skittles rolls out special packaging with subdued designs during this time of year in support of LGBTQ+ acceptance.

Normally, Skittles’ Pride wrappers are all-gray, and you might wonder why this is so. Why couldn’t the brand leave the rainbow behind? Why couldn’t it have more pops of rainbow hues? That’s because, each June, the brand gives up its colors for the rainbow Pride flag. Further, as Skittles explains, the gray signifies “the brand’s cemented efforts of support.”

Surprisingly, this year’s packaging has a little more vibrancy, as Skittles is allowing “a splash of color” for a snapshot of how LGBTQ+ individuals “see the rainbow.” To create the wrappers, Skittles enlisted six artists from the Pride community to depict what the rainbow means to them.

2022’s edition brings five Pride-themed designs by Chi NwosuMeg LeeMia SaineAsh + Chess, and Kah Yangni. As usual, the special-edition packs are being launched in conjunction with GLAAD, a nonprofit promoting positive representation for the community in the media.

Representation is right. Each design is printed with a QR code that, when scanned, directs customers to a virtual studio introducing the collaborators and their work.

The Pride packs will be available in 4oz and 15.6oz sharing sizes at select retailers across the country through June. For each purchase of a special-edition pack, Skittles will donate US$1, or up to US$100,000, to support GLAAD’s work in ending LGBTQ+ discrimination.

Source: DesignTAXI

How Food Commercials Are Made

Have you ever wondered how food looks so mouthwatering in advertisements? Steve Giralt is a food photographer. He has worked for brands like Hershey’s, Budweiser, Pepsi, and Starbucks. Steve uses a symphony of people, cameras, and robots to get the perfect shot.

Snickers Incites Flood Of Dirty Jokes By Playfully Denying Rumor It Removed ‘Dick Veins’ From Candy Bar

Earlier this month, Snickers began trending on social media after photos circulated suggesting the Mars Inc.-owned company “deveined” its classic treat so it would no longer be blatantly reminiscent of a penis.

People started running with the rumor on the grounds that another Mars-owned company, M&M’s, announced in January plans to give its iconic characters a makeover to coincide with our “more dynamic, progressive world.”

Despite the lack of—ahem—hard evidence in the rumored redesign of Snickers bars, the company took to Twitter on Tuesday to shut down the rumblings.

“Good news, contrary to what’s trending on Twitter…THE VEINS REMAIN!” Snickers wrote on its Twitter account.

From there, several candy companies joined in on the fun.

“Phew…close call,” Twix wrote, to which Snickers responded, “Waiting for the day you show yours off.”

“This seems a little juicy for Twitter,” Starburst replied to the chocolate bar’s tweet. 

Skittles jumped in the replies to remind consumers there’s no need to worry about encountering any suggestive veins, and Pizza Hut came just to watch the show.

The brand also offered a truly staggering amount of innuendo-filled replies to users.

Source: Complex

“Give The Green M&M Her Little Hoochie Heels Back” — Green M&M Loses Go-Go Boots In Rebrand

Can a group of multicolored candy characters change the world? The marketing minds behind M&M’s certainly hope so.

The brand just announced its multi-pronged approach to “creating a world where everyone feels they belong and society is inclusive,” and it apparently starts with makeovers for each of those colorful M&M’s characters that star in the brand’s popular commercials.

The candy company decided to give each of the six characters a “fresh, modern take” on their traditional look and “more nuanced personalities to underscore the importance of self-expression and power of community through storytelling.”

The blink-or-you’ll-miss-it design changes are kind of like looking at one of those “Can you spot the difference?” pictures, and they’re not immediately noticeable. But upon closer inspection, a few notable differences become clear.

The biggest — and perhaps most controversial — change is that the green M&M, who typically sports her signature white go-go boots, has stepped into a pair of “cool, laid-back sneakers to reflect her effortless confidence.”

Brown, the other female character, has also slipped into something a little more comfy — block heels, instead of her signature stiletto. She and the green M&M will also have a more friendly relationship than they’ve previously had, “together throwing shine and not shade.”

Online, people joked about the idea of these arbitrary character changes creating a more inclusive society — and many wanted these personified candies to stay the same.

“Today on Fresh Air,” tweeted Danielle Kurtzleben, NPR politics correspondent. “The green M&M, newly liberated from her white boots, lets loose. She talks social reproduction theory, how patriarchy and capitalism violently reinforce each other, and what a sexy lady M&M says about gender as a construct. Stay with us.”

“I am a single issue voter and my issue: KEEP THE GREEN M&M A HOT SEXY LADY,” tweeted another person.

Another Twitter user proposed that Green’s heels should be even higher.

Source: Today

The Hidden Message You Didn’t Realize Was In The Twix Logo

Do you remember when you learned that the FedEx logo had a hidden arrow in it? If this is news to you, check the negative space between the “E” and the “x.” Neat, eh? Logo design is a crucial part of the branding process, for sure, especially with household items and food products, considering just how often customers will be looking at the packaging. Iconic logos like Coca-Cola’s swoopy cursive letterforms and the McDonald’s golden arches have stood the test of time, but those are pretty straightforward examples. More intriguing is when designers decide to slip in secret design elements for consumers to find. This is the hidden message you didn’t realize was in the Twix logo.