Heineken Launching Sneakers With Actual Beer And A Bottle Opener In Them

These sneakers aren’t just made for walking — they have actual beer in them, and even come with a bottle opener.

Heineken Silver, the brand’s latest easy-to-drink brew, is launching a pair of sneakers that are kitted out with statement-making features.

Known as Heinekicks, these sneakers have discreetly built into the tongue a cool removable metal bottle opener. Yup, it’ll come in handy when you urgently need to crack open a bottle of beer, and don’t want to keep a spare bottle opener in, say, your pocket or your bag.

The Heinekicks’ most unique feature, though, is a see-through cushioned sole that has been injected with Heineken Silver beer, touted as the first of its kind in the world. After all, why walk on terra firma when you can walk on beer?

You may not be able to drink the beer from your shoes (obviously), but according to Heineken, “the soles provide the wearer with an unexpectedly smooth and unique sensation when on the go”.

To find out if that really is the case, you’ll need to be one of the lucky few in Singapore to get your paws on these sneakers. But it won’t be an easy feet, sorry, we mean, feat. There are only 32 pairs of Heinekicks in the world, and only seven will be made available in Singapore in the fourth quarter of the year.

Source: 8 Days

Sprite Discontinues Green Plastic Bottles For Environmental Reasons

Yahoo Finance Live checks out Coca-Cola’s decision to discontinue Sprite’s signature green plastic bottle on cut down on its environmental footprint.

Video Transcript

[MUSIC PLAYING]

DAVE BRIGGS: All right, before we go, a little food news roundup. Some headlines out there. Soft drink Sprite is retiring its classic green plastic bottles in favor of a clear plastic bottle starting August 1. Coca-Cola announcing the change Wednesday and pinned it on an effort to become more environmentally responsible. The clear plastic is more easily recycled and made into new bottles. So going green by ditching green, Seana. Does it bother you?

SEANA SMITH: It bothers me a little, but I think it’s something that I’ll be able to get over. I’m so used to seeing those green bottles. I don’t think I’m as opinionated about this as maybe our EP, Val, was this morning. She used the word– she was like, that’s disgusting. I’m never drinking Sprite again. So I don’t think I’m necessarily that far, but Rachelle, what about you?

RACHELLE AKUFFO: I mean, I do get it that yes, it does make it easy to just have the clear bottles and recycle them. But it’s like, these are the things that you cherished and grew up with. So it’s sad to see them go. But I mean, I guess at least, it’s for good reason, you know.

DAVE BRIGGS: Listen.

RACHELLE AKUFFO: I can’t really complain.

DAVE BRIGGS: Recycling plastic bottles is one of the greatest crises our world faces, so anything that helps curb that a little bit, I am on board with. We don’t hear enough about it.

Source: Yahoo Finance

Heinz Partners With Pulpex To Develop The First Paper Ketchup Bottle

To the casual observer, it would seem that there isn’t much room to innovate when it comes to ketchup. Tomato ketchup, sometimes called catsup, has been around since the early 1800s, with previous versions of the sauce using everything from mushrooms to fish. By 1876, Heinz got into the catsup game and continues to innovate on the condiment, recently developing a way to grow tomatoes and make the pantry staple on Mars.

However, Heinz’s latest ketchup development is less celestial and aims to address a very Earthly problem—plastic pollution. The firm has announced a partnership with sustainable packaging technology firm Pulpex to develop the first molded paper bottle in the sauce category.

Pulpex and Heinz expect the paper bottles made from sustainably sourced wood fiber to be “widely and readily recyclable” in paper waste streams. It remains unclear whether the bottle will be completely plastic-free. When asked by Dieline if the paper bottles would be plastic-free, Heinz responded by saying the paper bottle would be free from PET, HDPE, and BPA. Heinz also did not rule out using polypropylene for components such as the cap and described the inside coating as being “food grade.”

“Packaging waste is an industry-wide challenge that we must all do our part to address,” Kraft Heinz CEO Miguel Patricio said in a press release. “That is why we are committed to taking steps to explore sustainable packaging solutions across our brands at Kraft Heinz, offering consumers more choices. This new Heinz bottle is one example of how we are applying creativity and innovation to explore new ways to provide consumers with the products they know and love while also thinking sustainably.”

The new bottles are in the early prototyping stage, and Heinz has no consumer launch date yet.

Source: The Dieline

Amazon DSP Drivers Reveal The Challenges Of One-Day Shipping

Amazon has more than 115,000 drivers working under independent small businesses – Delivery Service Partners, or DSPs – who deliver Prime packages to doorsteps with one-day shipping. We talked to current and former Amazon DSP drivers about the pressures of the job. From urinating in bottles to running stop signs, routes that lead drivers to run across traffic, dog bites and cameras recording inside vans at all times – some of the 115,000 DSP drivers have voiced big concerns.

Aluminum shortage – Beer, soda makers struggle with aluminum can supply, plan to limit niche drinks

MotleyFool-TMOT-7aa6ec51-two-cans-in-ice.jpg

A shortage of aluminum cans is crimping supplies of certain drinks, industry officials said.

“Aluminum cans are in very tight supply with so many people buying more multi-pack products to consume at home,” Coca-Cola spokesperson Ann Moore said Wednesday in an email.

Can manufacturers announced plans to build at least three factories within the next 18 months, but that won’t solve the immediate supply issues.

“The aluminum beverage can manufacturing industry has seen unprecedented demand for this environmentally friendly container prior to and especially during the COVID-19 pandemic,” the Aluminum Association, an industry group representing the metal’s manufacturers, said in a statement. “Many new beverages are coming to market in cans, and other long-standing can customers are moving away from plastic bottles due to ongoing environmental concerns around plastic pollution. Consumers also appear to be favoring the portability and storability of cans as they spend more time at home.”

Source: USA Today