Mr. Men And Little Miss Memes Are Going Viral On TikTok And Instagram

In June 2022, American Girl dolls received the meme treatment. Now, TikTok and Instagram users are associating themselves with a literary character that was consistently found on the shelves of young millennials. Do you remember the colorful, miniature characters wearing nothing but bows in their hair, sometimes a fashionable pair of shoes, or a hat too small for their body? These adorable characters are the internet’s newest form of emotional therapy — using “Mr. Men” and “Little Miss” to call out their own insecurities and personality traits.

What started out as children’s books such as Mr. GrumpyLittle Miss Bossyand Little Miss Stubborn have now turned into a legitimate Instagram takeover, with Gen Z creating their own Little Miss, followed by a hyper specific quality about themselves. Whether it’s “Little Miss Repressed Childhood Trauma,” “Little Miss Daddy Issues,” or “Little Miss College Dropout,” these colorful, four-fingered, recognizable creatures from childhood are more relatable than ever.

Just like the American Girl trend, the “create your own” Little Miss is essentially a fill in the blank situation. Yes, the wording is a bit outdated — women being associated with “little” and men being tied to “Mr.” For that reason, the gender neutral character “Mx” has commonly replaced the use of “Miss” and “Mr” in order to represent the nonbinary community within this meme.

Users of the trend use it for everything — from calling out their emotional instability or hyping themselves up — the Little Miss possibilities are endless. Take “Little Miss Cries When She’s Mad” for example, because like, same. If you want to expose yourself by using the Little Miss meme, keep reading to understand what, why, and how this trend became a thing.

The Mr. Men book series was created by Roger Hargreaves in 1971 with the birth of “Mr. Tickle” — a squiggly yellow creature sporting a tiny blue hat. Looking to open up to a wider audience, Hargreaves created the Little Miss series in 1981 — introducing his young readers first to “Little Miss Sunshine,” “Little Miss Naughty,” and “Little Miss Bossy.”

The book series took readers through a day in the life of each Mr. Men or Little Miss — showing how their names impacted their traits, personalities, and individual choices. Past the Spice Girls getting their own “Little Misses” and “Little Miss Princess” being created to celebrate the wedding of Prince William and Duchess Kate, the Mr. Men and Little Miss books have taken on a new form and are once again connecting with Gen Z, one of the audiences they helped raise.

On April 19, 2022, Instagram meme creator @juulpuppy, created the first “Little Miss” meme, bringing to life icons like “Little Miss Borderline Personality Disorder,” “Little Miss Neurodivergent Stripper,” and “Little Miss Irritable Bowel Syndrome,” causing over 44,000 fans to be hit with both intense feelings of relatability and nostalgia. From there, the trend outgrew itself, as many memes do, and was quickly adapted on both TikTok and Instagram. Other Instagram accounts like @littlemissnotesapp began to repost @juulpuppy’s creations until they decided to develop their own versions of the memes as traction grew.

The memes started as a way for people to speak candidly about their mental health, physical struggles, and even insecurities. Examples like “Little Miss Homewrecker” and “Little Miss Anxious Attachment” resonated with people and provided laughter toward less lighthearted topics. Instagram users have since started to repost “Little Miss” memes describing themselves to their story in hopes that their followers would find it funny, or possibly even a bit relatable.

This form of emotional expression has now transformed into individuals calling out their own red flags. “Little Miss Wants Her Ex Back,” “Little Miss Former Horse Girl,” “Little Miss Narcissist” and “Little Miss In Love With Her Sneaky Link” were created by @starbucksslayqueen — providing followers with the material to easily torment themselves. No longer are people keeping their insecurities a secret. Sharing is caring in this case. Tag yourself, I’m “Little Miss Cheese Pizza Only” or “Little Miss Can’t Spell Restaurant” because TBH, I’ve been there.

Along with “Little Miss,” @starbucksslayqueen and other creators incorporated “Mr. Men” as well. “Little Miss” isn’t the only one who deserves to be called out. With that, characters like “Mr. Can’t Get It Up,” “Mr. Get On Top,” and “Mr. Doesn’t Use Deodorant” were born — giving people the avenue to reference their ex’s red flags that they otherwise would’ve kept hidden. Hey @starbucksslayqueen, I need a “Mr. Told Me I Was The Only Girl But Was Actually Talking To Three Of My Closest Friends,” please and thank you.

On TikTok, people have started describing themselves, their exes, or their friends as “Little Miss” or “Mr. Men” characters in 30 second long videos — claiming traits they might have been embarrassed about in the past. Starting at the beginning of July 2022, @starbucksslayqueen started sharing their graphics on TikTok, gaining even more attention for characters like “Little Miss Forgets To Eat” and “Little Miss Depression Nap.” The hashtag #LittleMiss now has over 41.4 million views and is overtaking the TikTok FYPs and Instagram Discover pages of Gen Z’ers everywhere.

Source: Bustle

Brittany Renner On Advice She’d Give An Aspiring IG Model

In this clip, Brittany Renner talked about launching her own podcast and working on the follow-up to her book. Brittany and Vlad also discussed investing and becoming financially independent. Later, she pondered about what advice she’d give any young aspiring IG model. While her answer seemed a bit cliche, it was the most important someone could receive: be yourself. Brittany talked about the importance of maintaining your identity and why it’s crucial in the world of social media.

The Real Story Of The Green Book – The Guidebook That Helped Black Americans Travel During Segregation

Until the Civil Rights Act passed in 1964, the Green Book was critical for black Americans wanting to travel across the country.

Road tripping in the 20th century became an iconic American obsession, and the rising middle class was eager to travel the country on the new interstate highway system. The Green Book was a unique travel guide during this time, when segregation was practiced all over the country.

The book, which grew to cover locations in all 50 states, listed hotels, restaurants, gas stations, beauty salons, and other services that would reliably serve African Americans. The listings grew from user correspondence and a network of African American postal workers under the guidance of Victor Hugo Green, the book’s publisher.

The American road trip would go on to be an anchor in the civil rights discussion, as it highlighted the injustices and prejudice that African Americans suffered under Jim Crow. Before the Civil Rights Act outlawed racial discrimination in public accommodations, Victor Green’s booklet helped black Americans navigate their country.

Chris Rock Explains Why He Hates Civil Rights Movies: ‘They Make Racism Look Very Fixable’

Chris Rock sounded off on films that deal with Civil Rights struggles and said the issue with the majority of these films is that they “make racism look very fixable.” Rock said the stories his mother used to tell him about the Civil Rights Movement era make it clear these films should be “dirtier,” if they want to be accurate.

“I hate all Civil Rights movies,” Rock said. “Don’t get me wrong, I applaud the effort and they should exist. The problem is they only show the back of the bus and the lunch counter. They actually make racism look very fixable. They don’t get into how dysfunctional the relationships were in the ’40s and ’50s, white men would just walk in your house and take your food… it’s a predator-prey relationship. Do you think when it was time to rape, [white men] were raping white women? No. They would go and rape the women they could actually rape without going to jail for.”

“This shit is so much dirtier than any movie ever shows,” Rock continued. “My mother used to get her teeth taken out at the vet because you weren’t allowed to go to the dentist. No movie shows you that.”

Rock did not call out any Civil Rights movies by name, although his argument that such films “make racism look very fixable” were the same criticisms thrown at Best Picture winner “Green Book.” 

Source: IndieWire