Black Lives Matter NY Loses All Credibility After Restaurant Releases Footage

The owner of a popular Manhattan restaurant stands by his employee on Friday and blasted the three African-American women from Texas charged with attacking the restaurant’s hostess for demanding to see proof they were vaccinated against COVID-19.

The incident happened last Thursday when three African-American women from Texas decided to dine at Carmine’s, a popular Italian restaurant in Manhattan. All three women showed proof of vaccination—which is a New York City requirement now—and were allowed to enter the restaurant.

However, three male friends of the African-American women showed up a little later and were refused entry because they did not show proof of vaccination. The party as a whole was offered seats outside instead.

The women claim the 24-year-old Asian-American hostess who refused entry to the male party was being “rude” and said the “N-word” before lunging at them first.

A viral video shows the group of African-American women physically assaulting the Asian-American hostess while she’s screaming, “Oh my god, what the f**k!?”

49-year-old Sally Recehelle Lewis of Houston, 44-year-old Kaeita Nkeenge Rankin, and 21-year-old Tyonnie Keshay Rankin, both of Humble, Texas, were charged with assault and criminal mischief. The three women were released without bail soon after.

In response, Black Lives Matter New York uploaded an Instagram post stating they will protest Carmine’s on Monday, September 20, and falsely stated the hostess who started it all was “White.”

On Monday, over 30 members of Black Lives Matter gathered in front of Carmine’s and chanted “Cancel Carmine’s,” while demanding African-American customers to leave the restaurant.

“After she dropped the N-bomb, the three women did a double-take and followed her out the restaurant,” stated Hawk Newsome, co-founder of Black Lives Matter New York.

Newsome and his cohorts demanded Carmine’s release security footage of the incident and claimed the restaurant was covering up the truth.

Carmine’s almost immediately released the footage to the local media, which clearly shows the three African-American women follow the Asian-American hostess outside and attack her without provocation.

Many witnesses state the women were bitter the other half of their party were not allowed to enter the restaurant and basically got angry they didn’t get what they wanted. No racial slur was ever heard leading up to the vicious attack or during it.

During Monday’s protest, members of Blacks Lives Matter can be heard screaming “We’ll teach you Whites and Asian people a lesson.”

Source: Asian Dawn

Conversations In Context: Organizing – Hosted By Yoonj Kim

Faced with historic injustices that often spilled into violence, Asian-American students at UC Berkeley–buoyed by the support of other student groups–went on strike in May 1968, demanding more diverse curricular representation. Later, leaders like Grace Lee Boggs and Larry Itliong would force a greater reckoning with the country’s past in order to extract social, economic, and legal change for their communities. Join MTV News correspondent Yoonj Kim and National Museum of American History Curator Theodore S. Gonzalves as they pick out lessons for the equally fraught landscape we face today.

NBA Sixth Man Of The Year Jordan Clarkson Helps Restore Filipino Food Truck (World Famous Yum Yum Asian Food Truck) After Racist Vandalism

Utah Jazz guard Jordan Clarkson helped restore a Filipino food truck that was vandalized last week with racist slurs and derogatory images.

According to Austin Facer of ABC 4, Clarkson was one of a number of people who joined IdentityGraphx and helped restore the World Famous Yum Yum Food Truck, which serves Asian fusion and Filipino food in northern Utah, after the vandalism.

Layton, Utah, Mayor Joy Petro and city council members were also involved in the restoration, and the food truck revealed its new paint job before its reopening at the Philippine Independence Day celebration on Saturday in Salt Lake City.

The owners of the truck thanked those involved in a Facebook post:

“It has been an emotional few days. The love and support that we got from all of you has been deeply heartfelt. My family can’t thank you guys enough. Special thanks to Utah Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson and Dan from Identity graphics for the new look. We want to thank everyone individually in a couple weeks when we have our LOVE celebration in the park and feed the community. Thanks to Mayor Joy Petro, Councilman Clint Morris, Councilman Zach Bloxham, Dustin, everyone in the neighborhood and all of you angels. Love prevails. We are going to have our grand reopening this Saturday at the Philippine independence day celebration in slc.”

On Wednesday, Layton Police announced they are still looking for those responsible for the vandalism and offered a $500 reward for information that leads to their arrest.

Source: Bleacher Report

Serbian Volleyball Player Sanja Djurdjevic Suspended After Making Anti-Asian Racist Gesture During Match Against Thailand

A Serbian volleyball player has been suspended for two matches after she was caught on camera stretching her eyelids — a racist gesture used to mock people with Asian heritage — during an international competition between Serbia and Thailand.

Sanja Djurdjevic violated the sport’s disciplinary rules on June 1 while competing in the match in Italy, according to a statement given Tuesday from the FIVB Disciplinary Panel Sub-Committee.

In addition to the suspension, the independent body, which is responsible for imposing disciplinary sanctions within FIVB competitions, fined Serbia’s volleyball federation the equivalent of $22,000. According to the panel, the FIVB will donate the money to a cause dedicated to tackling discriminatory behavior and/or to fund educational programs on cultural sensitivity.

Greater accountability

Posting on her since deactivated account, Djurdjevic apologized for her actions. “I am aware of my mistake and I immediately after the match apologized to the whole Thailand team.”

“I only wanted to address my teammates with the message: ‘Now, we will start playing defense like them,’ I didn’t mean to disrespect anyone,” she added.

The Volleyball Federation of Serbia also posted a conciliatory message on Facebook saying they “apologize sincerely” to the Thailand team, but asked people, “don’t blow this out of proportion! Sanja is aware of her mistake and she immediately apologized to the whole Thailand team.”

“She didn’t mean any disrespect. Of course, it was unfortunate. It all ended up as a simple misunderstanding, in a friendly atmosphere between the players of the two teams,” continued the team statement.

Attached to the written apology was a video shared by one of the Thai players, and an image of teammates from both sides standing together.As screenshots of the incident were widely shared on social media, thousands signed a petition calling for greater accountability.

“An apology is the bare minimum as a human being. But Djurdjevic and the National Volleyball Team represent their country in an official sport with official FIVB rules and those rules need to be upheld to maintain credibility and set the standard for the world,” the petition said.

A global reckoning

Djurdjevic’s actions come as the world reckons with a global spike in anti-Asian racism. From the UK to Australia, reports of anti-East and anti-Southeast Asian hate crimes have increased in Western countries as the pandemic took hold over the last year.

Athletes continue to speak out about violence towards Asian people, highlighting the role that social media plays in illuminating these incidents. Earlier this year, former NBA star Jeremy Lin encouraged spectators to “watch these videos to see this is actually happening.”

The FIVB confirmed that Djurdjevic’s sanction is “final,” adding that they are “committed to fostering understanding, solidarity and unity against all forms of discriminatory behavior.”

“The FIVB will continue to work tirelessly with all of its National Federations to ensure that these values are reflected across the whole community,” they added.

Source: CNN

Man Released On $10K Bond After Shooting A Young Boy As He Retrieved His Bike From The Man’s Yard

Michigan man Ryan Le-Nguyen has been released on bond after he shot and injured a six-year-old Black boy who attempted to retrieve his bike from a yard.

FOX 2 Detroit reports that Le-Nguyen threatened the young boy, Coby, with a sledgehammer before firing a shot at the child from the front window of his house. The boy’s father, Arnold Daniel, said his children were playing outside on their bikes in Ypsilanti Township, Michigan, when they left their bikes in front of one of their neighbors’ home. When Coby attempted to retrieve the bike, he said that Le-Nguyen came out with a sledgehammer in his hands.

“He tried hitting me with a sledgehammer but that’s not going to work because I’m too fast,” Coby said. “[He] got a gun and BOOM shot me right here.” Thankfully, the boy only sustained injuries during the shooting, and the bullet went through his arm. He’s currently back at home and is recovering from his injuries, from which he is expected to be okay. Le-Nguyen was arrested and charged with assault with intent to murder, but he was released on a $10,000 bond just three days later.

While Coby appears to be in high spirits following the incident, his father is still confused as to why he was released on a bond “so low for trying to kill my kid.”

“Right now, he’s not even processing what happened. He doesn’t realize how close he came to not being here… But I realize it,” he added. Le-Nguyen has been told he is not to return home, but Daniel said he’s still concerned “because I don’t know what he’s capable of.”

Source: Complex

Charts That Dismantle The Trope Of Asian Americans As The ‘Model Minority’

“Smart.” “Hard-working.” “Nice.” Those were among the adjectives that respondents offered up in a recent poll when asked to describe Asian Americans.

The poll, conducted by the nonprofit Leading Asian Americans to Unite for Change (LAAUNCH), was another all-too-familiar reminder that Asian Americans are still perceived as the “model minority.”

Since the end of World War II, this myth about Asian Americans and their perceived collective success has been used as a racial wedge — to minimize the role racism plays in the struggles of other minority groups, such as Black Americans.

Characterizing Asian Americans as a model minority flattens the diverse experiences of Asian Americans into a singular, narrow narrative. And it paints a misleading picture about the community that doesn’t align with current statistics.

Here’s a look at some common misconceptions driven by the model minority myth.

Myth: Asian Americans are a single monolithic group

Currently, more than 22 million people of Asian descent live in the U.S., making up approximately 7% of the nation’s population. They trace their heritage to different regions around the world, with people of East Asian and Southeast Asian descent making up the largest shares, though no group makes up a majority. More than 1.5 million Pacific Islanders, who descend from Micronesia, Melanesia or Polynesia, live in the U.S. as well.

Academics and activists trace the term “Asian American” to 1968, when students at the University of California, Berkeley, founded the Asian American Political Alliance. At the time, the group sought to unite students of Japanese, Chinese and Filipino descent to fight for political and social recognition.

“Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders” (AAPI) is a term that has its roots in the 1980s and ’90s, when the U.S. Census Bureau used the “Asian Pacific American” classification to group Asians, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders together. In 1997, the bureau disaggregated the categories into “Asian” and “Pacific Islander.”

Myth: Asian Americans are high earning and well educated

Asian Americans have a median household income of around $78,000 a year, which is higher than the national median of about $66,000. However, that overall statistic obscures large differences among different Asian-origin groups.

These economic disparities are partially driven by similar disparities in education levels among Asian Americans. The highest-earning groups — Indian American and Taiwanese American households — also have the highest levels of education, while the lowest-earning groups have comparatively lower levels of education.

In fact, a 2018 Pew Research Center study found that Asian Americans were the most economically divided racial or ethnic group in the U.S., with Asian Americans in the top 10th of the income distribution making 10.7 times more than those in the bottom 10th.

Myth: Asian Americans immigrate to the U.S. in the “right” way

The Asian American community has the highest proportion of immigrants of any ethnic or racial group in the United States. Yet, Asian Americans are often overlooked in debates about immigration reform.

Asians have a wide range of reasons for immigrating to the U.S., including those coming as refugees or asylum-seekers. Out of the almost 11 million estimated undocumented immigrants in the U.S., around 1.5 million (14%) are from Asia, according to the Migration Policy Institute.

Heightened immigration enforcement has also impacted Asian Americans. From 2015 to 2018, Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested about 15,000 immigrants from Asia, according to a report by the nonprofit Asian Americans Advancing Justice.

The report also found that Southeast Asian immigrants were three to four times more likely to be deported for old criminal convictions compared with other immigrant groups. Out of the approximately 16,000 Southeast Asians with final removal orders in that period, more than 13,000 had removal orders that were based on old criminal convictions.

Myth: Asian Americans face less systemic racism and discrimination

Since the coronavirus pandemic started, hate crimes and violence against Asian Americans have increased. In an April survey conducted by the Pew Research Center, 32% of Asian American adults — a greater percentage than any other racial or ethnic group — said that they feared someone might threaten or physically attack them.

But anti-Asian bias and discrimination are not new to the pandemic. To understand the current climate, it’s important to look at historical context. In past periods of national tension, especially during times when the U.S. has been at war with Asian countries, anti-Asian racism has similarly risen.

Myth: Asian Americans are fairly represented in leadership positions

Asian Americans are underrepresented in these positions of power, holding about 3% of these positions in comparison with composing 7% of the U.S. population, a report from The New York Times found last year.

More specifically, Asian Americans have the lowest degree of representation in political office compared with any other racial or ethnic group.

Asian Americans are even underrepresented in states with a high concentration of Asian American residents, like New York and California, according to a report by the Reflective Democracy Campaign.

Especially since the start of collective activism among Asian Americans in the 1960s, Asian Americans have had a rich history of political activism and involvement. But that history has not always translated to greater representation in political leadership.

Source: NPR