Ticketmaster To Require Negative COVID-19 Test Result Or Vaccination Verification In Order To Attend Concerts

Many details of the plan, which is still in development phase, will rely on three separate components — the Ticketmaster digital ticket app, third party health information companies like CLEAR Health Pass or IBM’s Digital Health Pass and testing and vaccine distribution providers like Labcorp and the CVS Minute Clinic.

Here’s how it would work, if approved: After purchasing a ticket for a concert, fans would need to verify that they have already been vaccinated (which would provide approximately one year of COVID-19 protection) or test negative for coronavirus approximately 24 to 72 hours prior to the concert. The length of coverage a test would provide would be governed by regional health authorities — if attendees of a Friday night concert had to be tested 48 hours in advance, most could start the testing process the day before the event. If it was a 24-hour window,  most people would likely be tested the same day of the event at a lab or a health clinic.

Once the test was complete, the fan would instruct the lab to deliver the results to their health pass company, like CLEAR or IBM. If the tests were negative, or the fan was vaccinated, the health pass company would verify the attendee’s COVID-19 status to Ticketmaster, which would then issue the fan the credentials needed to access the event. If a fan tested positive or didn’t take a test to verify their status, they would not be granted access to the event. There are still many details to work out, but the goal of the program is for fans to take care of vaccines and testing prior to the concert and not show up hoping to be tested onsite.

Source: Billboard

Playboy Suing Fashion Nova Over Halloween Bunny Costume

Playboy’s pissed at Fashion Nova for rolling out new bunny costumes, just in time for Halloween, which it claims are plainly “an attempt to piggyback off the popularity and renown of Playboy’s iconic bunny costume.”

Translation: Quit bitin’ our bunny!

In docs, obtained by TMZ, Playboy says Fashion Nova completely ripped off its iconic costume — which includes cuffs, collar, bowtie, corset, ribbon name tag, bunny ears and tail — and is selling them as Halloween costumes on its website. According to the suit, Fashion Nova’s even using the description “Bunny of the Month,” which Playboy says is a clear reference to its Playmate of the Month trademark.

Source: TMZ

Yelp Will Label Businesses Accused Of Racist Behavior

In what the company calls a “firm stance against racism,” the review site Yelp will warn consumers when a business has been reported for racist behavior.

The company said it would only add this alert to a business page “when there’s resounding evidence of egregious, racist actions from a business owner or employee.”

This will include behavior such as “using overtly racist slurs or symbols.”

“As the nation reckons with issues of systemic racism, we’ve seen in the last few months that there is a clear need to warn consumers about businesses associated with egregious, racially-charged actions to help people make more informed spending decisions,” the San Francisco-based company said in a Thursday statement.

On social media, the announcement prompted some praise, but also skepticism from users who questioned how the initiative would be enforced.

The company said the alert will require a news article from a “credible media outlet.” A link to the article will accompany the notice, and it will appear over the reviews until dismissed.

Source: NPR

Food Personality Eddie Huang Announces Closure of Baohaus NYC – Taiwanese Pork Belly Buns that Catapulted ‘Fresh Off The Boat’ Autobiography & TV Show on Asian American Experience

Eddie Huang has just announced the official closing of the bao shop that started it all. Opened in 2009, Huang and his close friends/partners set out to tell their story through food, via delicious pork belly buns (gua bao) to be exact, and Baohaus in New York City‘s Lower East Side was born. Two years later, Baohaus moved to a larger location in East Village where they remained up until now.

The popularity of his New York establishment has aided in catapulting Huang into the fields in which he has always believed saw the least bit of Asian-American presence — Television, film, and literature — to which he has now all successfully offered his voice to. Huang points out that it was not an easy decision with, “We held out as long as we could, but we have decided to close. Shouts to the customers that ran in thinking we were open, it means a lot. It’s been a wild and fulfilling 10-year ride with Baohaus but I’d be lying if I said ‘I can’t believe what’s happened.’”

In the Instagram post, Huang shouted out his team, plugged his upcoming film Boogie, quoted Raekwon, and paid his respects to Prodigy and Anthony Bourdain. And with that, Baohaus turned on their glowing-blue neon sign for the last time. It’s on to the next adventure for the Human Panda.

Source: Hypebeast

What it’s Like Being on an Empty Cruise Ship During Covid-19 — “Everything is shut down, lights are off, furniture is covered up. It’s a ghost ship.”

For the cruise liner industry, the COVID-19 pandemic officially began on March 14. That’s when the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a “no sail” order on all cruise ships operating in US waters. At that point thousands of people were falling ill on various ships around the world, pitching the industry into damage control. From there, individual companies suspended cruises one by one, putting the industry on hold.

We spoke to a man named Jeff Birmingham about what it’s like being one of 99 people onboard a stationary cruise ship designed for 6,000. Jeff describes being alone for most of the day and how the industry is faring from an insider perspective.

Tell us about where you are at the moment.
I’m offshore of Singapore in what I can only describe as the biggest ship parking lot I’ve ever seen. My contract is through February of next year and I’m not sure if I’ll touch dry land before then. As of now, we’ve been told not to expect that.

How does it feel to be on an almost empty cruise liner?
It’s surreal. This ship was built to host thousands of people and I’ve spent years on this ship experiencing it as it was designed. But walking around now, the ship feels lifeless and empty. It’s in stasis waiting for the world to sort itself out so it can go back to what it’s designed to do. Everything is shut down, lights are off, furniture is covered up. It’s a ghost ship.

What do you do everyday? Is there enough work to keep you busy or do you get bored?
I’m not really ever bored. My department usually has about 150 people but now it’s just me to deal with all the paperwork and inspections. It’s an overwhelming amount of work keeping the ship in the kind of condition it needs to stay in so it can go back into service. Plus, since there is very little to do socially the work basically takes all my time. I’ve been here over a month and it feels like I just got here.

Source: Vice

Community left behind: Asian American businesses affected by COVID-19; Asian American unemployment has quadrupled since the pandemic hit

While Asian families like Li’s are struggling to hold on, President Donald Trump has continued to tout positive trends for employment numbers.

That success has not been shared by American minorities — economically, they remain the hardest hit. The unemployment rate for Asian Americans has spiked to record highs.

It’s a drastic change from before the pandemic, when the demographic had the lowest unemployment rate across the board, at just 2.5%.

Today, Asian American unemployment has more than quadrupled to 10.7%. Black Americans are the only demographic with a higher unemployment rate.

Racist rhetoric from the White House likely hasn’t helped, with Trump repeatedly referring to COVID-19 as “the China virus.”

The backlash over the origin of the novel coronavirus has made recovery for Asian-owned businesses like the Li’s nearly impossible.

“National leadership kept referring to it as ‘the Chinese virus’ or ‘the China virus,’” Li said. “Of course with that kind of name, Chinatown and the people that live and work here are going to be associated with it.”

Source: ABC News

Aunt Carrie’s Vs. Iggy’s: The Battle of Rhode Island’s Most Beloved Summer Delicacy – Clam Cakes (Clam-Filled Dough Balls)

Rhode Island’s most beloved summer delicacy is something you may have never heard of: the clam cake, a clam-filled dough ball that’s deep-fried and sold by the dozen. Two neighboring restaurants, Aunt Carrie’s and Iggy’s, are both famous for their clam cakes – but whose are the best? A crew of local clam cake connoisseurs help us investigate.

A More Diverse Workplace Is Good for Society, and for Business — Creative Director Justin LaBaw-Rivers’ Experience as an African American Graphic Designer

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Nonette Llabres spoke with Justin about his solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, his experience as an African American designer, the need for more diversity in agency leadership roles, and taking inspired action to balance working for yourself and making a difference in the world.

It’s very common to not have enough diversity, especially in the traditional creative agency world. One figure I’ve seen is that only 10% of workers on agency teams are people of color.

All of them want the same thing as I do — we want to create really dope products that can change the world and work with fun people at the same time.

Aluminum shortage – Beer, soda makers struggle with aluminum can supply, plan to limit niche drinks

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A shortage of aluminum cans is crimping supplies of certain drinks, industry officials said.

“Aluminum cans are in very tight supply with so many people buying more multi-pack products to consume at home,” Coca-Cola spokesperson Ann Moore said Wednesday in an email.

Can manufacturers announced plans to build at least three factories within the next 18 months, but that won’t solve the immediate supply issues.

“The aluminum beverage can manufacturing industry has seen unprecedented demand for this environmentally friendly container prior to and especially during the COVID-19 pandemic,” the Aluminum Association, an industry group representing the metal’s manufacturers, said in a statement. “Many new beverages are coming to market in cans, and other long-standing can customers are moving away from plastic bottles due to ongoing environmental concerns around plastic pollution. Consumers also appear to be favoring the portability and storability of cans as they spend more time at home.”

Source: USA Today