People Are Sharing Things People Say That Are Biiig Red Flags, Usually To Trick Or Deceive You

On Tuesday, Reddit user u/neilnelly asked people, “What is something subtle people say that is a red flag to you?” People came through with some truly useful examples of things people will say that are usually to trick, manipulate, or deceive you.

Here’s what they shared:

1. “When they never ask a question when you’re telling them something. My husband realized his father never does this, and now I can’t stop listening for this.” —u/foofoofoobears

2. “When they say, ‘But you’re so good at it!’ That’s them saying, ‘I’ll compliment you in the hope that you’ll take this task off my hands.'” —u/amelie_v

3. “When they say, ‘OK, fine. I’m sorry. Happy?’ That’s not an apology.” —u/Celq124

4. “Or, if they say, ‘I’m the worst person ever’ in their apology. Then their ‘apology’ turns into you assuring them and ignoring whatever they did that hurt you.” —u/lissalissa3

5. “When a mom says, ‘I try to be more like my kids’ friend than their mom.’ You need to wait around 20 years to do the best friend thing. My mom made sure I was home on time, went to school, got good grades, didn’t swear, went to university, and all the other great mom stuff that was annoying when I was young. Now, she is my absolute best friend by far.” —u/holyurushiol, u/bugbugladybug

6. “Non-apologies: ‘I’m sorry you got offended by what I said.'” —u/SelfDiagnosedUnicorn

7. “When people say things like, ‘I can say and do whatever I want. It’s a free country. Ever hear of freedom of speech?’ in order to justify shitty things they say or do. Like sure, you have the right to speak your mind, but people also have the right to judge you for what you say.” —u/87319496

8. “When they say, ‘I’m brutally honest’ or some other excuse to be an unbearable person.” —u/mywifemademegetthis

9. “When somebody says something about themselves when it’s not prompted or necessary. Like randomly saying, ‘I’m an honest person,’ or ‘I’m a hard worker.'” —u/jrhawk42

10. “When someone says, ‘It’s just a joke.’ It’s called ‘Shrodinger’s Douchebag’ — deciding on whether what you said was a joke or not depending on people’s reactions.” —u/Drprim83

11. “Someone who frequently, in response to you telling them about a bad or inconvenient thing that happened to you, start with ‘Well what you SHOULD have done…’ or ‘What I would have done…’ These people tend to be very opinionated and stubborn, even in situations they don’t really know anything about.” —u/solaris_eclipse

12. “Anything that exposes poor morals or tricks others. For example, ‘I’ll just say I never got it so they send me another one.’ When people show you who they really are, believe them. Love this quote.” —u/emik7133

13. “When people say shit like, ‘clearly,’ ‘obviously,’ etc. If someone has to reassure you or themselves that something is real, it’s dangerous. Relationships, politics, academia. Never trust someone who thinks their opinion is an absolute.” —u/dirtyhippie62

14. “When they say, ‘Oh, it’s ok. It doesn’t matter” in attempt to calm me down, as in it’s silly that I’m upset by something not too important. It doesn’t matter to whom??? Because obviously it does matter to me.” —u/cherry_tiddy

Source: BuzzFeed

Westminster High School (Westminster CA) Dedicates New Learning Pavilion In Honor Of Sylvia Mendez – A Central Figure In Legal Fight To Integrate Local Schools Years Before Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board (1954)

Sylvia Mendez knows a thing or two about breaking barriers. But, as she noted Wednesday, this may have been her first time cutting a ceremonial ribbon.

Not far from where she and her brothers were denied enrollment at a school because of their Mexican heritage, setting in motion a landmark desegregation case with national reverberations, the civil rights icon visited Westminster High School to help dedicate a brand new learning pavilion named in her honor.

“I am very aware how much work went into putting this together,” Mendez said. “Muchísimas gracias. I am so grateful, and so thank you. Thank you very much.”

On an outside wall, a towering mural created by artist Chuck Adame — with the help of fellow artists Israel “Ezra” Cervantes and Jose Joaquin — captures both the vision of the pavilion and the significance of Mendez v. Westminster.

The dignified profile of Sylvia Mendez occupies the top left corner of the mural, along with the year her case was resolved. Also depicted are her parents, Gonzalo and Felicitas Mendez, the Presidential Medal of Freedom she was awarded in 2011, a blindfolded Lady Justice, books with the term “equality” written on their spines in multiple languages, and the Japanese kanji character for “harmony.” The latter symbolizes the family’s bond with members of the Munemitsu family who leased their farmland to the Mendezes after being ordered to an internment camp for Japanese Americans during World War II.

This story begins in 1943, also in Westminster. That’s where Gonzalo and Felicitas Mendez tried to enroll Sylvia and her brothers, Geronimo and Gonzalo, at 17th Street School, known as “the white school.”

But district officials directed the family to Hoover Elementary, a campus for Mexican American children. Sylvia Mendez, just 8 years old at the time, would later describe Hoover as “a terrible little shack” with dirt for a playground.

Her parents hired a local attorney, who later consolidated the case with four other Orange County families who were willing to take legal action. Mendez, et al v. Westminster claimed that 5,000 children throughout the county were unjustly harmed by unconstitutional segregation policies.

The families won a groundbreaking victory in the U.S. District Court in 1946 that was upheld by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals the following year. On May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its Brown v. Board of Education decision, which asserted that all laws promoting school segregation were unconstitutional.

Gonzalo Mendez died in 1964, and Felicitas Mendez died in 1998. In accordance with her mother’s wishes, Sylvia Mendez has spent much of her post-retirement life speaking publicly about the case and talking to students about the importance of education.

She’s now 85, and there is little doubt that her efforts to raise awareness have been successful, expanding the case’s profile across the country.

The Santa Ana Unified School District opened Gonzalo Felicitas Mendez Fundamental Intermediate School in 2000. More recently, the Westminster School District rededicating its central office with a marquee that reads, “Westminster School District, In Honor of La Familia Mendez.” And last year, Felicitas Mendez became the subject of a Google Doodle.

Meanwhile, OCDE has teamed up with the city of Westminster to construct a local trail, park and monument that will honor Mendez v. Westminster and its legacy.

“In Mendez v. Westminster there was no violence, I have to tell you,” she said. “People came together to right a wrong. It took my parents and the other families a lot of courage. This court case is all about the struggle for equal education and for basic human rights.”

Source: OCDE Newsroom

Wingstop Launches Thighstop Amid Chicken Wing Shortage

Wingstop is expanding its body of chicken offerings with Thighstop, an online-only, temporary restaurant that will deliver chicken thighs via DoorDash amid a chicken shortage.

The “new thigh concept” will be available at more than 1,400 locations nationwide and is addressing the “consumer’s fear of a chicken wing shortage head-on,” the company said in a release provided by Thighstop spokesperson Megan Sprague.

“We think they’ll appeal to guests because they’re a different part of the chicken and therefore a new way to experience Wingstop flavor,” Charlie Morrison, CEO and chairman of Wingstop restaurants, said.

“They eat like a wing, but with more meat,” Morrison continued.

Chicken lovers will have access to a menu filled with crispy thighs of a naked and sauce-covered variety with 11 signature Wingstop flavors.

And it doesn’t stop with the drumstick. Other Wingstop items including its ranch and blue cheese dips, fried corn, french fries and rolls are also available to order from Thighstop.

Eventually, Morrison hopes thighs will be incorporated into the larger Wingstop menu as a permanent addition.

Thighstop claimed in its launch announcement that it is addressing consumer fear over a wing shortage which made the news last month.

The nation’s chicken wars and cravings for comfort food during the pandemic have made poultry so scarce and expensive that some restaurants are limiting or running out of chicken sandwiches, wings and tenders. Others are considering changes to menus and promotions.

Heavy winter storms took a larger bite out of supply. While some restaurants have not been able to meet demand, it’s unclear if and how the low supplies will affect consumers in the grocery store.

The poultry industry is tamping down growing alarm over a chicken shortage with National Chicken Council spokesman Tom Super saying there was a “very tight supply but short of a shortage.”

“Yes, supply is somewhat tight, but the sky certainly isn’t falling,” Super said in May. “Chicken producers are doing everything they can to overcome the devastating impact of Mother Nature when she inflicted the once-in-a-lifetime winter storm on Texas and nearby states — major chicken producing regions.”

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, broilers — chickens raised for meat — slaughter was down 4% in the first quarter of 2021, with pounds produced down 3%. Production began picking back up in early April, Super said.

Morrison said the shortage has less to do with product than it does with labor.

“The shortage has as much to do with the impact of government stimulus and creating an artificially high wage rate that is competitive to the people that are necessary to actually process chicken,” Morrison said. “Because of this, the absolute number of chickens that are being processed is down.”

Sales are still on the rise at Wingstop, though. Morrison said that Wingstop saw 20.7% sales growth in the first quarter of this year in spite of constraints. Introducing Thighstop, he said, allows the company to focus on additional parts of the chicken.

Source: Chicago Sun-Times